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dem0lsh0r

Just got my learner's permit

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Please, for the love of Neptune, do NOT stop using your turn signals. Not only are they a law, and hated all over the road, it's been shown that not using your signal/blinker/indicator increases the likelyhood of an accident.

http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2012/05/02/new-study-says-failure-to-use-turn-signals-is-a-leading-cause-of-car-accidents/

This danger far exceeds distracted via cell phone, and in general is neglectful driving. Don';t let anyone tell you that phones are the biggest "problem" on the road.

They're still an issue, keep your phone down pls.

 

Also, please use your seatbelt, I've learned over the years most of the safety features in the car are helpful if you hit someone, but lifesaving when someone hits YOU.

 

Upboated for life progress :)

Edited by NitroLauncher717

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Gratz on your permit. Remember to stay safe and follow the rules of the road. The moment you become complacent will be the moment something goes wrong. Always expect the other guy on the road to do the stupidest possible thing, and you should be prepared.

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Take it from a 3 million mile professional owner/operator: A safe following distance will get you out of 99% bad situations also, give big trucks a wide berth we're at work not going to Sonic for a coney... Congrats on your milestone!

Edited by Jim_Byrnes

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Good advice above.  Spend time learning your vehicle.  Find a big empty parking lot and practice parking where you can't hit anything.  When It snows, go there and practice handling your car on ice.  Learn to feel what a skid is like and what you can (and can't) do about it.  It isn't enough to *know* these things, because in an emergency you don't have time to think and remember.  Your reactions have to become instinctive - and that takes lots of practice.

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Good advice above.  Spend time learning your vehicle.  Find a big empty parking lot and practice parking where you can't hit anything.  When It snows, go there and practice handling your car on ice.  Learn to feel what a skid is like and what you can (and can't) do about it.  It isn't enough to *know* these things, because in an emergency you don't have time to think and remember.  Your reactions have to become instinctive - and that takes lots of practice.

this x10000000

 

I can't stress enough how important it is to know how your car is going to react in a slide if you lose control. 

 

The only other advice I can offer is relevant if you're in an area with a lot of deer. Don't try to stop or swerve around it. Aim for where the animal is, and floor it. Chances are it will try to dodge the car, and if you do wind up hitting it, there's less of a chance of it coming through the windshield if you're accelerating (I hit a moose in my first truck and got these tips from a long haul courier while I was waiting for a flat deck trailer)

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Thanks so much for all the support. I don't have my own car yet, but I'm able to practice using my mom's van. Anyone have suggestions for a beginner car? I'm trying to go for something around the size of a sedan with decent gas mileage, and pedals with low sensitivity.

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Thanks so much for all the support. I don't have my own car yet, but I'm able to practice using my mom's van. Anyone have suggestions for a beginner car? I'm trying to go for something around the size of a sedan with decent gas mileage, and pedals with low sensitivity.

depends how much you want to spend. I would go for something japanese since they tend to be longer lasting than domestics and European cars. they're also usually cheaper to maintain. Civics, corolla, mazda3...

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Thanks so much for all the support. I don't have my own car yet, but I'm able to practice using my mom's van. Anyone have suggestions for a beginner car? I'm trying to go for something around the size of a sedan with decent gas mileage, and pedals with low sensitivity.

 

Firstly, congratz mate! Just let me know whenever you get on the road so I can stay home...:hiding:

 

lol joking aside, as for good cars...I personally would recommend an older car, from the early 2000s, with the least amount of miles you can find. I got my 2002 Chevy Malibu for $5k and it only had something like 75k miles on it. Was in near perfect shape as well.(interior was nearly spotless as well) No accidents on its record, and was even the personal car of my local town's police chief before he retired. He took really good care of that car when he had. I've never had any issues with it to date. :)

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Go Honda civic, Toyota corolla. Sedan that's older with lots of spare and easy to come by parts. Definetly older because you can work on it yourself if something goes wrong. Avoid things like the Prius - far too many mechanical parts and electrics that cost an arm and a leg to fix should something go wrong.

 

My first was an 06 Chevy Cobalt, newer, but very basic in maintenance, no funny hoops or casemate. No going up through the engine to replace a headlight. Fuel efficient 4 cylinder that was easy enough to fix without needing a fancy mechanic. They're about 7-8K now for a base fleet model, could look into it.

 

Also, never, ever, ever assume what's written on the sticker is what you should pay. Always negotiate, usually you can get the dealer or seller to come down 500 or more. (That seems a little high, considering the year and it doesn't even have many options) is a good one to stick to. Always know as much as you can about the car before you even test drive it, or they will enforce sticker because you don't know anything about it. 

Learn the dealers in town we have a Weird Wally who has the best prices in the city, has a sweet deal for donating to city officials in exchange for noone coming sniffing around his...less than honest...mechanic shop who makes his used cars, as he says: "ready for the street, I promise you, nothing less" Know your enemy, and know yourself, if you don't like it or you feel pressured to take the deal, walk away, it will save you from a 6K scrap heap on the side of the interstate.

 

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If economy is a goal consider diesel engines, very economical in smaller cars and require less maintenance than a standard petrol engine.

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If economy is a goal consider diesel engines, very economical in smaller cars and require less maintenance than a standard petrol engine.

High mileage, low cost?

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High mileage, low cost?

 

high(ish) cost of fuel (depending on time of year and your climate, diesel can be cheaper than Plus gasoline, typically warmer areas that don't need to carry winter blend) and high cost of a new engine (often more economical to just buy a new car if it goes out. Lower costs averaged due to the life of the engine/ vehicles they're put in.

That said, diesel engines can go for double/triple the lifetime of a gas engine. Ive heard the newer ones are rated for an excess of 1m miles (not sure if semi or car, worth a look)

Edited by NitroLauncher717

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Thanks so much for all the support. I don't have my own car yet, but I'm able to practice using my mom's van. Anyone have suggestions for a beginner car? I'm trying to go for something around the size of a sedan with decent gas mileage, and pedals with low sensitivity.

I have had very good luck with cars made by Hyundai and Kia. My current car is a Kia Forte, which I bought for the economy aspect mostly.

 

I'd recommend looking at the Forte or the Hyundai Elantra  (which is the same car with slightly different body panels)

 

There is a lot of good advice already in this thread. Safe following distances, practice in a parking lot, don't be on the phone, etc. There are only two things I haven't seen mentioned.

 

Please try to be extra cautious of motorcycles. I have had people look right at me and then pull out in front, including one truck that I couldn't avoid. (I walked away, I was lucky). Don't be that "I never saw them" guy. (Applies to pedestrians and other cars too)

 

And lastly the bit of advice my dad gave me when I started driving. "Always assume that everyone else on the road is going to try to hit you." In our terms, assume that everyone else is a complete potato and will do the stupidest things at the worst times. 

 

If you are ready for them to be idiots, then it won't surprise you when they are :-)

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I'd honestly say avoid a diesel. Assuming you actually are in North America, the only one you'll really find is in a VW golf or jetta. They're great on fuel, but fixing them is a huge pain and will be stupidly expensive. Not as bad as my Mercedes, but way more pricey than a Japanese import or domestic

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I'd honestly say avoid a diesel. Assuming you actually are in North America, the only one you'll really find is in a VW golf or jetta. They're great on fuel, but fixing them is a huge pain and will be stupidly expensive. Not as bad as my Mercedes, but way more pricey than a Japanese import or domestic

Born in Texas, moved to Florida when I was 3. I've been living here in the Sunshine (bipolar) State ever since.

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