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Sir_Robert_Whitney

History of the Pacific War part 2

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A couple months ago I posted a topic asking if anyone knew any good books about the pacific war. I ended up deciding on Mark E. Stille's "The Imperial Japanese Navy in the Pacific War". Included inside is the authors account of Japanese Naval doctrine leading up to the pacific war. And then goes class by class and describes the history of the warships in the IJN, development, modification, war service etc.

 

2 things have come to mind after reading this book that directly relate to World of Warships.

1) Japanese National Flavor

2) The progression up the IJN BB line.

 

(all of this is according to this author and could be open to dispute)

Japanese Naval Doctrine was to have their Battleships engage at max range, while their Destroyers executed massed torpedo attacks on the enemy formation led by light cruisers and backed up by heavy cruisers and battle cruisers. Their carriers were supposed to be strike oriented and their first order of business was to eliminate any enemy carrier task forces.

- Max Range Battleships

- Emphasis on Destroyer torpedo attacks

- Strike oriented Carriers.

I find it curious that all of these aspects of the naval doctrine are/were implemented in the game in one way or another.

 

2) IJN Battleship Progression (in regards to the argument that only ships that really existed and were commissioned be put in the game)

The current progression is 

3. Kawachi

4. Myogi

5. Kongo

6. Fuso

7. Nagato

8. Amagi

9. Izumo

10. Yamato

 

If you were to try and construct a line with only ships that existed in full in real life it would be this:

3. Kawachi

4. Kongo

5. Fuso

6. Ise

7. Nagato

8. Yamato

 

I in no way think that the Yamato should be tier 8, but I think it is curious that time wise, that the Yamato at tier 8 would line up completion date with its american counterparts, being the north Carolina and south Dakota class. 

 

My point I guess is that, I used to complain that paper ships should not exist in the game, and I felt that way about all lines, particularly the soviet cruisers. But if you actually look at how you will construct a line without paper ships it gets hard to preserve balance. Now should consideration be given to paper ships that started construction rather than simply design concepts? I believe yes, because if ships started construction they convinced a large chunk of the admiralty to pay for it, rather than a design that was submitted but never accepted. That would give preference to the Amagi and Tosa class instead of the Izumo. 

 

This is a long topic with some interesting tangents, thank you for reading. I find these topics very interesting, and this book is amazing and I love reading it.

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you bring up some good points. If you want a good book to read try "At dawn we Slept" which is the best book out there for the Pearl Harbor attack.

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you bring up some good points. If you want a good book to read try "At dawn we Slept" which is the best book out there for the Pearl Harbor attack.

 

I'll have to add that to my list :look:

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I have that book, and I enjoy looking at it for references on stuff. Unfortunately, my one History professor said that Osprey is a bad publisher to go to for research purposes... :/

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I highly recommend Shattered Sword the untold story of the battle of midway. It clears up a lot of myths and untruths out there about the battle.

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I highly recommend Shattered Sword the untold story of the battle of midway. It clears up a lot of myths and untruths out there about the battle.

 

Or if they want a quick tl;dr, any of Parshall's lecture at the NWC

 

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Very interesting interview, especially the part about Operation K, and the more recent translations that show it only reinforced what Yamamoto wanted to hear.  I also did not know that Nimitz was willing to offer battle with only 2 CVs, although given the sorry performance of Hornet, that's exactly what he did.

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I'll check that book and here are a few I can recommend.

 

Kaigun: Strategy, Tactics, and Technology in the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1887-1941: David C. Evans, Mark R. Peattie

 

Attack on Pearl Harbor: Strategy, Combat, Myths, Deceptions: Alan Zimm (interesting new look on PH)

 

Downfall: The End of the Imperial Japanese Empire, Richard B. Frank (political background)

 

All of these are superb. Heck, I would say they are required reading for anyone wanting to learn about the Pacific War. I would recommend reading Gordon Prange's At Dawn We Slept before Zimm's work because the latter isn't a narrative of the attack itself, and Zimm assumes the reader already knows the general jist of what he will be reevaluating (which is what Prange provides). If anyone wants more recommendations just ask. I have a lot floating around in my head.

 

Here is another random work one can read:

 

https://www.usnwc.edu/getattachment/fb6e3982-4f6f-43ee-8742-23261fb5f486/A-Question-of-Estimates--How-Faulty-Intelligence-D.aspx

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Just wanna share this nice poem about the USN submarines.

 

Always Remember by John Chaffey

 

Let it never be said that we don't remember.

What Submariners have done since that day in December.

The sun shown bright on that Pearl Harbor morning.

When the enemy attacked with little or no warning.

 

The Tautog was there with no time to think.

And splashed one Japanese plane right down in the drink.

She sent twenty-six ships to the depths of the sea.

And came to be known as the "Terrible T."

 

The Sealion at Cavite was the first to be caught.

She was moored to a pier but bravely she fought.

Two bombs exploded through the hull they did rip.

And many brave submariners died in their ship.

 

There were many proud boats like the Perch and the Finback.

The Kraken, the Haddock the Scamp and the Skipjack.

We remember the Halibut Blenny and Darter.

And never forget Sam Dealey in Harder.

 

Cutter and Seahorse's torpedoes ran true.

She targeted the enemy and sank many Marus.

And although the enemy was quite filled with hate.

"Red" Ramage and Parche showed many their fate.

 

"Mush" Morton and Wahoo never backed down from a fight.

Fluckey and Barb entered Namkwan Harbor one night.

Many airman were saved by O'Kane and the Tang.

Some owe their lives to Seafox, Tigrone and Trepang.

 

We remember the honorable boat called Barbel.

Before she was lost she gave the enemy hell.

The Sturgeon, the Trigger the Pollack had heart.

The Torsk made the last two frigates depart.

 

Nowadays the cold war seems to be a big factor.

And submarines are powered by nuclear reactors.

The proud names are still there the Tautog did shine.

But her hull number by then was Six Thirty Nine.

 

Many boats gave their all with heroic namesakes.

Like Thresher Scorpion, Nautilus and Skate.

The Seadragon, Swordfish Richard B. Russell and Dace.

Have all stood out to sea and heard the enemies trace.

 

We remember "Forty-One For Freedom" whose patrols couldn't fail.

The George Washington Andrew Jackson and Nathan Hale.

Now the Alaska and Nebraska and other Tridents are here.

They patrol the deep oceans so aggressive nations have fear.

 

There are new boats on the line called Cheyenne and Wyoming.

They will all do us proud like the old Gudgeon and Grayling.

So take time each day and think of the past.

Then toast the new Seawolf for she's quiet and fast.

 

Let it never be said that we don't remember.

What submariners have done since that day in December.

The sun still shines bright every Pearl Harbor Morning.

But never forget the enemy attacks without warning.

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