Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
You need to play a total of 10 battles to post in this section.
Ariecho

January 13 - Focus: Tribal-class (1936)

16 comments in this topic

Recommended Posts

2,236
Alpha Tester
4,441 posts

General



 



NGTM is sick today, so he asked one of our little crew to post the following article for him.  As usual, please reserve any eventual "+1" for whenever he comes back online.



 



Ships with a significant event on a January 13:



1898 - HMS Caesar - Majestic-class - Laid down



1944 - USS Duluth - Cleveland-class - 



1945 - USS Bridgeport - Baltimore-class - Laid down



 



Statistics of surface ships:



Allies: 33 laid down, 23 launched and 30 commissioned.  January 13 was one of the (too) few days where no Allied surface warship was sunk.



 



 



1937



 



Today, HMS Bedouin was laid down in 1937, part of the second batch of Tribal-class destroyers for the Royal Navy. The 1936 Tribal-class destroyer (as opposed to the 1905 one) came from a disturbing realization on the part of the Royal Navy. All their existing destroyer designs were based on HMS Amazon and HMS Ambuscade, date of service 1926. 4 4.7” SP guns, two torpedo mounts, light weight.



 



And they were terrible.



 



Even at a time when the Royal Navy was patting itself on the back with their new WW1+ destroyers Japan was busy launching Fubuki, which rendered every existing destroyer obsolete; by 1936 the Asashios were waiting in the wings and the Hatsuharu and Shiratsuyu classes were already on the water. The Americans were launching the very powerful Somers-class ships and preparing the ships of the Benham and Sims classes, which while not the monsters the Somers were remained superior in every way. The French contre-torpilleur classes and their answer in the Italian esploratori classes and ultimately the early Condottieri-type ships rounded out the inter-war collection of destroyer-like monstrosities that were now roaming the waves.



 



HMS Bedouin returning to port in Iceland, 1941



HMS_Bedouin_28F6729_off_Iceland_c1941_zp



 



The Tribal-class was the first attempt by the Royal Navy to build a world-class destroyer, and would be the best destroyer in UK and Commonwealth service until the arrival of the Battle class in 1944. Born of the “Design V” project which would also ultimately give birth to the Dido-class AA cruisers, they emphasized gunnery over torpedoes and had dual-purpose main batteries of four twin 4.7” guns, with only a single quad torpedo mount. The also included superior light AA to world standard at the time. They were thought of as a prestige ships, based on their large size and powerful armament, and that the Royal Navy was forced by cost to go back to the previous less-capable design metrics after the Tribals meant that the class gained a mystique as the best and the brightest of the Royal Navy's destroyer force.



 



Hard to kill: HMS Eskimo in 1940 after the Second Battle of Narvik, her bow amputated by a German torpedo.



HMSEskimoBowTorpedoDamageMay1940_zps1399



 



When the war came, these were the best ships Britain had in their weight class, and they were used heavily and fought hard. From the Second Battle of Narvik to chasing down weather ships to steal their codebooks to fleet actions in the Mediterranean to the disastrous raid on Tobruk, by 1942 the Tribals had both justified their high expectations and their detractors. Their DP armament wasn't quite dual-purpose enough, with slow rates of training and elevation, so that most of them lost their X turret in exchange for a twin 4” gun mount, and their “above world standard” light AA armament had proved to be still horribly inadequate. But they were big and tough and heavily armed, and proved more than able to meet their Italian and German opposite numbers in combat. The Royal Navy ran them hard, and they paid the price; by 1942 of the 16 built for the Royal Navy 12 had been lost.



 



Stealer of secrets; HMS Somali, a ship that was often involved in operations that captured German material related to the Enigma machine.



HMS_Somali_28F3329_zpsb4e3e077.jpg



 



After 1942, however, new tactics and new weapons fits made things better. Canada was making a new design with four twin 4” guns, in addition to completing several to the British 1942 fit. Australia had just launched her own pair of Tribal-class ships as well. The Canadian ships fought on the convoy lanes to Russia and in the Channel and the Bay of Biscay. HMCS Athabaskan was the last of the class sunk during the war, in April in the Channel by a German Elbing-class torpedo boat; but her sisters would avenge her during the series of small-ship actions that attended Operation Overlord. The Australian pair, HMAS Arunta and HMAS Warramunga, served out the war as members of the US Seventh Fleet in all but name and both fought at Surigao Strait, and though their turn of speed was inferior to their American consorts they were remembered well. The last British Tribals soldiered on to the end of the war, participating in the battles in the Channel before, during, and after Operation Overlord, transferring to the Pacific where they waited as backup during the Battle of Malacca Strait, and finally participating in the last Royal Navy surface action of the war in 1945 when HMS Nubian and HMS Eskimo sunk a subchaser and a merchant ship near Sumatra.



 



HMAS Warramunga with a surprisingly American paint scheme, 1944.



HMAS_Warramunga_28AWM_01712829_zps557bf6



 



After the war, with the ships of the Battle and Weapon classes coming on-line, the Royal Navy retired their Tribals. The Canadians modernized and refitted theirs, and they lasted in service until the mid-1960s; one, HMCS Haida, survives as a museum ship in Hamilton, Ontario. The Australians modernized two of their three, having completed another in 1945, and the Australian ships served with distinction in Korea, but all were out of service by 1960.



 



HMS Sikh during night firing practice, 1940.



The_Royal_Navy_during_the_Second_World_W



 



Dimensions



Displacement (standard): 1850 tons



Displacement (full load): 2520 tons



Length: 377 feet



Beam : 36.5 feet



Draft: 9 feet



 



Weapons (as completed)



4x twin 4.7”/45 QF Mark XII DP gun



1x quad 2pdr QF Mark VIII (40mm/L39) AAMG



2x quad Vickers .5”/62 Mark III AAMG



1 depth charge rail, 2 throwers



 



Engines



3 boilers, 2 turbines, 2 shafts



44000 SHP



 



Performance



36 knots



5700 nautical miles at 15 knots



 



Crew



190 (219 when fitted as squadron leader)


Edited by Ariecho
  • Cool 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,737
Alpha Tester, In AlfaTesters
4,384 posts
681 battles

 

Hard to kill: HMS Eskimo in 1940 after the Second Battle of Narvik, her bow amputated by a German torpedo.

HMSEskimoBowTorpedoDamageMay1940_zps1399

 

 

Images like this really drill in how well-built and well-compartmentalized ships of this era were. It's amazing how ships like the Indianapolis could sink so fast due to localized damage when a virtually-identical ship, New Orleans, had her entire bow removed.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,904
Supertester, Members, Alpha Tester, In AlfaTesters, Beta Testers
11,416 posts
1,963 battles

Good stuff!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,236
Alpha Tester
4,441 posts

 

Images like this really drill in how well-built and well-compartmentalized ships of this era were. It's amazing how ships like the Indianapolis could sink so fast due to localized damage when a virtually-identical ship, New Orleans, had her entire bow removed.

 

 

A very good point!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
663
Alpha Tester
1,440 posts
2,061 battles

Prove it ... :hiding:

 don't feel bad, I thought I missed a day :veryhappy:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,137
Members
3,592 posts

I will deny until I run out of catnip...

 

my-favorite-catnip-kitty-funny-cat-pictu

And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why he keeps me around... Old cat is old..:trollface:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,973
[XODUS]
Alpha Tester
4,691 posts
2,055 battles

 

Images like this really drill in how well-built and well-compartmentalized ships of this era were. It's amazing how ships like the Indianapolis could sink so fast due to localized damage when a virtually-identical ship, New Orleans, had her entire bow removed.

 

 

 

Luck of the draw, as it goes; there's nothing really in a bow you need, but your engine room is a different matter. What impressed me was that they actually bothered to repair that damage; the Brits, aware of their low shipyard capacity, were apt to write off ships that seriously damaged.

 

As an aside, you'd be amazed at how hard it is to find photographs of damage and repair for ships that weren't USN. While the US obsessively documented battle damage and you can usually find pictures of the ship's damage if it made it to a shipyard, similar documentation is really hard to come by for other nations.

  • Cool 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,236
Alpha Tester
4,441 posts

And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why he keeps me around... Old cat is old..:trollface:

I'm not "keeping you around".  If I could, you would end up with your ship, barnacle boy! :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×