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Ariecho

November 14 - Focus: Naval battle of Guadalcanal and Admiralen-class

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General

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November 14 was another busy date in history.  We had several ships and events to cover, but because of a few factors, could only come up with one today.  The other events that were noticeable on a November 14 were:

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1908 - SMS Dresden was commissioned

1908 - SMS Kolberg was launched

1929 - FS Dupleix was laid down

1929 - HNMS Banckert was launched

1931 - FS Kersaint was launched

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Statistics:

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Allies:

39 Allied surface ships were laid down

56 Allied surface ships were launched

32 Allied surface ships were commissioned

4 Allied surface ships were lost

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Germany:

1 German surface ship was launched

1 German surface ship was commissioned

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Japan:

No activity

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Italy:

1 Italian ship was laid down

1 Italian ship was launched

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1942

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It is difficult to talk about the 2nd battle of Guadalcanal (as the actions that happened on November 14, 1942, are referred to) without talking about what happened the days before.  You would be wondering if the action that developed was coming right out of a Star Trek movie. “Beam us up, Scottie, target point: Guadalcanal!”.  Therefore, I have decided to incorporate important events that happened on the 13th, as well as the aftermath, that occurred on the 15th.

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The Naval battle of Guadalcanal

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Known on the Japanese side as the Third Battle of the Solomon Sea, the naval engagement occurred between November 12 and November 15.  It was only a part of a larger operation that started on August 7, 1942, when US forces landed on Guadalcanal and other islands around.

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Until October, the Japanese, through what was known as the “Tokyo Express” kept delivering reinforcements in an attempt to take back some strategic key points on the island.  Later that month, Admiral Yamamoto claimed a tactical victory against his US counterpart Halsey at the battle of Santa Cruz.  He knew though that every loss the Americans endured could be easily replaced, but also that any loss on the Japanese side would require many sacrifices to bring an equivalent back.

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While USS Hornet was lost, USS Enterprise would be back in time for the battle of Guadalcanal.  On the other hand, IJN Zuiho would have to wait until January 1943, Shōkaku wouldn’t be operational until March 1943, and Zuikaku would have to wait until July of the same year.  More importantly, more than half of the Japanese veteran pilots who had started the war were dead by the battle was over (148 during the battle alone, against 26 for the Americans), and it would take some time to replace them.

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In November 1942, the Imperial Japanese Army was in dire need of reinforcements to have sufficient strength to launch another attack on the American positions.  11 large transport were assembled, and a support force was put together that included battleships Hiei and Kirishima.  Their job was to bomb the airport of Henderson field and provide cover for the transports and their 7,000 troops.  Vice Admiral Hiroaki Abe was supervising the military armada from Hiei.

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Friday the 13th!

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On November 12, Abe’s forces started their push towards Guadalcanal, with an expected arrival on the 13th.  Escorting his 2 battleships, Abe had light cruiser Nagara, as well as 14 destroyers, of which 3 were covering the rear of the formation.

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Allied air assets spotted the Japanese force and relayed its position to Admiral Callaghan, who ordered all warships in the area to intercept the Japanese, preferably at night.

Callaghan had at his disposal heavy cruisers San Francisco and Portland, light cruisers Helena, Juneau and Atlanta, as well as 8 destroyers.  Callaghan was clearly outgunned.  San Francisco and Portland both had 9x 8-inch guns, to which Hiei and Kirishima could answer with their 8x 14-inch guns.

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Callaghan intended to meet Abe at night.  One would think that he had a good reason for that, a device named the SG radar, a surface search radar capable to detect a battleship at a distance of 22 nautical miles, or a destroyer at a distance of 15 nautical miles.  Yet, Callaghan, who had 5 ships equipped with the radar decided not to put them ahead of his formation.  Neither did he decide to use one of them as his flagship.  Also very surprisingly, he didn’t give any detailed order to any of his commanders.

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Not knowing of the presence of US forces in the area, Abe asked his commanders to load HE shells to attack Henderson Field.  These were special rounds that were used to do maximum area damage, and were not regular ammunition used by the battleships.  Because there was no convenient way to store them, they were kept on the battleships' deck.

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Posted Image

Abe forces (red) against Callaghan's (black)

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At 01:24, the US ships detected the Japanese fleet.  Radio messages were sent to Callaghan who first didn’t receive them, then not trusting the radar, decided to plot the information on his map, pretty much wiping out his technical advantage.  The more modern but inexperienced US forces would now face older but well-trained Japanese forces who held regular night formation exercises.

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A few moments later, because of Callaghan's misuse of his tactical assets, both forces were in visual range.  Abe was debating if he should withdraw his forces momentarily (as his battleships’ decks were loaded with the special highly explosive ammunition that he was going to use against Henderson Field) or if he should attack.  Callaghan, on the other side, couldn’t read what he was facing, and started to give contradicting orders, as more and more Japanese ships in small clusters were appearing.

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At 01:48, battleship Hiei and and destroyer Akatsuki turned on their powerful search lights on USS Atlanta.  The distance between the 2 forces was a mere 3,000 yards.  Callaghan, who had tried to cross the T, but had found himself surrounded by Japanese ships issued the following order: “Odd ships fire to starboard, even ships fire to port”.  The only detail missing in that order is that, as aforementioned, Callaghan hadn’t issued any detailed order to his commanders.  In other words, nobody knew who was an odd ship, and who was an even ship!

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Posted Image

Attempting to cross the T

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Akatsuki’s search lights decided for everybody, and soon, US destroyers Laffey and O’Banon, and cruisers Portland, Helena, Juneau, and Atlanta opened fire on her.  It didn’t take long before Akatsuki exploded and sank.

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In return, USS Atlanta became the target of the Japanese ships who attacked her with guns and torpedoes.  A type 93 torpedo cut her engineering power, and Atlanta drifted in the line of fire of USS San Francisco, whose shells killed Admiral Scott.  Not paying attention to her anymore, the Japanese ships kept charging in, passing her by.

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What would have supposed to be a long distance fight had become a brawl, with distances so short that destroyer Laffey almost collided against battleship Hiei, whose guns couldn’t depress enough to hit the destroyer.  This didn’t stop Laffey to unleash whatever she had on the battleship, wounding Abe, and killing his Chief of Staff.

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With the US destroyers so close, the Japanese heavy guns now focused on USS San Francisco, killing Admiral Callaghan.  Two American Admirals had just died in the same battle.  San Francisco was badly damaged, but she still managed to score a lucky hit in Hiei’s steering gear room, deeply decreasing her ability to maneuver.

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The Japanese then switched focus on 2 of the US destroyers (Cushing and Laffey), sinking them.  They were avenged by heavy cruiser Portland, who sank destroyer Akatsuki, but was herself hit by a torpedo.  The Japanese kept charging, and soon reached the rear of the American formation, or what was left of it, sinking destroyer Barton.  USS Juneau would be the next one to be hit, victim of destroyer Yudachi who torpedoed her.  What looked like a bar brawl ended after 40 minutes when both forces retreated.

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Abe asked for a battle report. 1 battleship (Kirishima), 1 light cruiser (Nagara), and 4 destroyers (Asagumo, Teruzuki, Yukikaze, and Harusame) only had light damage, while 4 destroyers (Inazuma, Ikazuchi, Murasame, and Samidare) reported moderate damage.  Nothing stood in Abe's way to finish the American forces in the area, and to allow his transports to land safely in Guadalcanal.  It was a brilliant success for the Imperial Japanese Navy … or it would have been… if Abe didn’t decide to abandon the area.  Learning of the outcome of the battle later on, Yamamoto was livid.

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When the sun rose later on, 7 wounded ships were still in the area where the battle had happened:

  • Battleship Hiei became the target of aircraft from Henderson Field aircraft, USS Enterprise, and B-17s who flew from Espiritu Santo.  She sank later on that day.

  • Yudachi was eventually sunk by Portland who, while crippled, was still in the area.

  • Amatsukaze managed to escape the wrath of US aircraft, and lived to see another day.

  • On the US side, Portland and Aaron Ward managed to make it to safer waters and were eventually repaired.

  • Atlanta’s crew thought that she would make it, but by 20:00 she sank near Guadalcanal.

  • Juneau, who had left the area alongside San Francisco, Helena, Sterret, and O’Banon was ambushed by Japanese submarine I-26, who sank her.  It took eight days before rescue arrived, and took care of her 100 survivors (out of 697).

Japan had lost the first round, but it would take more for Yamamoto to give up.

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Posted ImageIron Bottom Sound, as the place would be known after so many ships from both sides sank there

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Posted Image

Hiei trying to avoid B-17s

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November 14.

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After receiving news from the events that had occurred on the 13th, Yamamoto relieved Abe from his command, and ordered forces based in Rabaul to take over the effort.

Vice Admiral Mikawa and his 8th fleet cruiser force with heavy cruisers Chōkai, Kinugasa, Maya,and Suzuya, light cruisers Isuzuand Tenryūas well as 6 destroyers took advantage of the US fleet departure from the area.  After bombing Henderson Field, they left back to Rabaul.  The attack, while violent, didn’t do major damage to the airfield.

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As soon as daylight appeared, Henderson Field’s aircraft took off.  Soon, they spotted the task force and sank heavy cruiser Kinugasa, damaged heavy cruiser Maya, then focused their attention on the troop transports, sinking 7 of them..

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Battleship battle

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Two other groups, one American, and one Japanese had not started to dance yet.  Admiral Halsey, getting reports of the engagements on the 13th, dispatched part of USS Enterprise’s escort towards Guadalcanal.  Battleships Washington and South Dakota, as well as 4 destroyers arrived in the same area where the battle had happened on November 13.

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Posted Image

USS Washington

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Opposite to them was a Japanese task force led Admiral Kondo, consisting of battleship Kirishima, heavy cruisers Atagoand Takao, light cruisers Nagaraand Sendai, as well as 9 destroyers.  This time, the Allies had the heavy guns (9x 16-inch guns on each battleship against 8x 14-inch guns on Kirishima).  They also had the radar advantage and intended to use it.

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Posted Image

Kirishima, November 1942

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A little before 23:00, American radar picked up the Japanese spearhead around 20,000 yards.  5 minutes later, the Japanese also sighted the Americans, but for some reason mistook them for cruisers.  Old cruisers Sendaiand Nagara, as well as their escorting destroyers closed in, and were soon met by the 16-inch guns of USS Washington, but miraculously escaped.

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While Washington focused on Sendai, Nagara and Ayanami were attacked by the US destroyers.  Japanese sailors' better experience at night fight prevailed and soon, two US destroyers (Preston and Walke) were sunk by a combination of gun fire and torpedo attacks.  The two other destroyers (Gwin and Benham) survived, but had to retreat.

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The two American battleships continued, and took destroyer Ayanami as a target.  Things would take a bad turn then when South Dakota started soon after to suffer from electrical problems.  Even though, she still continued to follow Washington.

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On his flagship, Admiral Kondo received reports that the American had been defeated, and he started to focus fire with Kirishima on Guadalcanal.  Moments later, along the burning silhouettes of USS Preston and Walke appeared a much larger shade.  USS South Dakota, betrayed by the fire from the US destroyers, was illuminated and for the Japanese to see as in daylight.  Soon, every Japanese gun and torpedo tube in the area focused on the American battleship, who was hit at least 26 times, knocking down her communication and gunfire control centers, forcing her out of the area.

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Washington, in the meanwhile, still undetected by the Japanese, continued her approach until she was less than 10,000 yards away from Kirishima.  After identifying her target as not being South Dakota, Washington opened fire on Kirishima, setting her ablaze, and jamming her rudder.

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Posted Image

Note Washington guns' low elevation, showing how close the range was

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By 00:25 on November 15, Kondo asked all his forces to finish Washington, who was leaving the area, to create a diversion to save South Dakota.  Once she had ceased fire, Washingtonwas almost invisible for the Japanese who took some time to finally find her, wasting unsuccessfully their last torpedoes on her.

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The four remaining transport beached themselves at 04:00, debarking between 2,000 and 3,000 troops, out of the 7,000 that the 11 original group of transport carried.  A few hours later, they were destroyed by a combination of US ground artillery as well as an approaching US destroyer: USS Meade.  In the meanwhile, battleship Kirishima didn’t survive the engagement and sank.

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Posted Image

Beached Japanese transports

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Conclusion:

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A few pages won't give enough credit to the brave men on both sides who fought during those nights.  Their fate would take a book to write, and I only had a few hours.  My hasty conclusion will be focused on command.  Of the three Admirals who were present on the 13th, 2 missed opportunities to definitely turn the scales to their advantage.  Abe didn't pursue his tactical victory, which would eventually cost the lives of between 4,000 and 5,000 Japanese soldiers who were on the 7 transports ultimately sunk.  He also cost the lives of the second task force put together to finish his job the following day.

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On the other side, Callaghan seemed to have been totally unprepared.  He didn't take advantage of the huge technological advantage his ships had, and, also charged in without giving any order to his Captains.  Only Abe's lack of confidence saved the day

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The battle between November 12 and November 15 would be the last large attempt by he Japanese to reinforce Guadalcanal.  Soon after, the US Navy was in a position to deny any attempt to bring more troops in.  However, and to their credit, they still managed to successfully evacuate their troops the following year.  As I often say ... it's a different story.

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Sources:

World War II database

Naval battle of Guadalcanal

Battleship action

USN cruiser vs. IJN cruiser: Guadalcanal 1942

Wikipedia (pictures and maps)

Uboat.net (daily statistics)

Own database of German, Japanese, and Italian ships

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1929

A Dutchie is never late, he/she always arrives at the time he/she is supposed to..unless his name is JeeWeeJ, he'll always be late.

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Yes, i'm late! Sorry about that! Anyway, today i have a class of Dutch destroyers for you: the Admiralen-class! For today in 1929, HNLMS Banckert was launched (1929) AND commissioned! (1930)

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Posted Image

The Dutch Admiralen-class destroyers in line

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At the end of the 1920's the Dutch navy wished to replace the elderly pre-ww1 destroyers of the Wolf-class, also known as the Roofdier (English: Predator)-class. With WW1 over, the new ships were to be modern yet also have long legs so they could be used in the Dutch East Indies.

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It is unclear if the Dutch were unable to produce an effective design of their own, but somehow they ended up going for a British design: that of HMS Ambuscade, a British prototype destroyer which ultimately evolved into the famous Tribal-class.

But the Dutch weren't pleased with the Ambuscade as-is, and ordered it's designer, the shipyard Yarrow & Co. Ltd, to make some alterations to the design. The first alteration was the addition of a floatplane, something you don't see very often on a destoyer, but which increased the scouting range of the ships tremendously. The second was the replacement of the British FCS by a Dutch one. Sources are unclear on which specific system was introduced to the Admiralen-class, but it might have been a Hazemeyer FCS system, as most Dutch ships had their FCS produces by that company (and were deemed to be of very high quality and performance).

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Posted Image

Kortenaer at high speed

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Eight ships were built in batches of four:

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Batch 1

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HNLMS Evertsen

Laid down: 08-05-1925 at Burgerhout's Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Rotterdam

Launched: 12-29-1926

Commissioned: 04-12-1928

Fate: Beached after severe battledamage at Seboekoe Besar reef 02-28-1942

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HNLMS Piet Hein

Laid down: 08-26-1925 at Burgerhout's Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Rotterdam

Launched: 04-05-1928

Commissioned: 01-25-1928

Fate: Sunk by the Japanese off Bali in the night of 02-20-1942

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HNLMS De Ruyter (later HNLMS Van Ghent)

Laid down: 08-28-1925 at Koninklijke Mij "De Schelde", Vlissingen (Flushing)

Launched: 10-23-1926

Commissioned: 05-31-1928

Fate: Accidentally beached after on Bamidjo reef on 02-15-1942

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HNLMS Kortenaer

Laid down: 08-24-1925 at Burgerhout's Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Rotterdam

Launched: 05-30-1927

Commissioned: 09-03-1928

Fate: Sunk by an Japanese long lance torpedo during the Battle of Java sea at 02-28-1942

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Batch 2

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HNLMS Van Galen

Laid down: 05-28-1927 at Wilton-Fijenoord, Rotterdam

Launched: 06-28-1928

Commissioned: 10-22-1929

Fate: Suffered severe damage from German planes during the seige of Rotterdam, managed to get back to the harbour where she was scuttled by her crew at 05-12-1940

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HNLMS Witte de With

Laid down: 05-28-1927 at Wilton-Fijenoord, Rotterdam

Launched: 09-11-1928

Commissioned: 02-20-1930

Fate: Hit by a Japanese bomb while escorting HMS Exeter to Surabaya after the Battle of Java sea, was scuttled due to the damage on 03-02-1942

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HNLMS Banckert

Laid down: 05-15-1928 at Burgerhout's Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Rotterdam

Launched: 11-14-1929

Commissioned: 11-14-1930

Fate: Scuttled in Surabaya after repeated Japanese air attacks at 03-02-1942. Later raised by the Japanese and renamed Patrolboat 106, but repairs were never completed.

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HNLMS Van Nes

Laid down: 05-15-1928 at Burgerhout's Scheepswerf en Machinefabriek, Rotterdam

Launched: 03-20-1930

Commissioned: 03-12-1931

Fate: Sunk by aircraft from the Japanese carrier Ryujo on 02-17-1942 while escorting a troopship to Batavia.

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As you can see above, the class can't be called very lucky as naerly all of them were (indirectly) lost due to hostile actions. They were also never properly upgraded when it came to AA defence or ASW capabilities. Only Van Ghent and Witte de With received ASDIC equipment, but none of them got the chance to use it during WW2.

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Posted Image

Piet Hein somewhere during the 1930's

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Service life

Not a whole lot it written about the service life of the Admiralen-class destroyers. The most extensive coverage I found was on the site www.netherlandsnavy.nl, which i shall quote here (as I cannot say it any better).

From Netherlandsnavy.nl:

Evertsen

Deployed as convoy escort during 1940-1942. In February 1942, she became part of the Western Striking Force, a squadron of Allied ships based at Batavia. During its last sortie in the night of February 27 and 28, it became seperated from the main force, after which she returned to her base on the 28th. During the following night, she was ordered to escape to Colombo via Sunda Strait, but the ship was intercepted by the Japanese destroyers Murakumo and Shirakumo en route. Several hits caused a large fire, after which the captain saw no other option than to beach his ship on the reef Seboekoe Besar. Nine men were killed, the others were captured and imprisoned for the duration of the war.

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Posted Image

HNLMS Evertsen

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Piet Hein

In the night of February 19 and 20, she was part of the Allied force which tried to destroy the Japanese invasion forces at Bali. During the following gunfight, she was hit by shells and several torpedoes, after which she sank with the loss of 64 crew.

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Van Ghent

In action off Kangean against Japanese bombers on February 4, 1942. Took part in the Allied sortie against the invasion convoy for Palembang on February 15, but during the squadron's transit through Stolze Strait, she was accidentally beached on the Bamidjo reef between Banka and Billiton island. Position 03.05 S-107.21 E. No casualties, the entire crew was taken off by Banckert.

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Posted Image

A torpedo being launched from De Ruyter, which was later renamed to Van Ghent

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Kortenaer

Took part in the Allied sortie against the invasion convoy for Palembang on February 15, and escaped unharmed. Also took part in the Battle of the Java Sea, during which she was hit by a Japanese torpedo, reportedly from the Japanese heavy cruiser Haguro, which broke her back in position 06.29 S-112.05 E. 56 or 59 of a crew of about 150 were killed.

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The wreck of Kortenaer was discovered in 2004 by an Australian diving team, which originally had set out to find HMS Exeter.

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Posted Image

HNLMS Kortenaer of the Admiralen class

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Van Galen

In service in the Netherlands East Indies until 1939, when she was recalled to Holland. Arrived in Den Helder on May 8, 1940. On May 10, the Germans invaded the Netherlandes. On the same day, Van Galen was ordered to steam to Rotterdam to bombard the German forces at the captured airfield Waalhaven with her main battery. While still en route, she was attacked by German aircraft, which damaged her. She made it to the Merwehaven, where she sank. Raised by the Germans on October 23, 1941, and scrapped in Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht.

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Posted Image

Van Galen at full speed

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Witte de With

Took part in the Battle of the Java Sea (February 27-28, 1942); escorted the British heavy cruiser HMS Exeter to Soerabaja after she had been damaged by Japanese shells. Witte de With was damaged by a Japanese bomb hitting the fo'c'scle on March 1, 1942. She was then scuttled on March 2. No casualties.

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Banckert

In action off Kangean against Japanese bombers on February 4, 1942. Took part in the Allied sortie against the invasion convoy for Palembang on February 15, during which she evacuated the crew of her sistership Van Ghent. Damaged by Japanese aerial attacks on February 24 and 28, 1942, after which she was scuttled on March 2. Raised by the Japanese, who intended to commission her as Patrol boat 106, but the repairs were never completed. Found in damaged condition after the war and sunk as targetship during gunnery excercises in Madura Strait, September, 1949

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Van Nes

Escorted the Dutch passengership Sloet van de Beele, which carried a detachment of troops from Billiton for Batavia. Attacked and sunk by Japanese aircraft from the Japanese carrier Ryujo in position 03.27 S-106.38 E, February 17, 1942, with the loss of 68 crew.

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Posted Image

Postcard of Van Nes

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Stats

Dimensions

Length (total): 98.1m

Length (waterline): 93.4m

Beam: 9.5m

Draft: 3.0m

Dispacement: 1,316t

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Weapons

120mm Bofors Siderius No.4: 4 (No. 5 for Banckert and Van Nes)

75mm No.6: 2 (The ships of batch 2 only had 1)

40mm Bofors No. 1: 1 (ships of batch 2 only)

12.7mm Browning: 4

53.3cm (21") torpedo tubes: 6 (armed with Whitehead type II 53 torps)

Mines: 24

Depthcharge trowers: 4

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Armor

None

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Engines

Shafts: 2

Turbines: 2

Type: Parsons geared turbines

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Performance

Total Performance: 31,000shp

Max speed: 34kn

Range: 3,300 miles at 15kn

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Aircraft

Total: 1

Type: Van Berkel W-A later Fokker C VII-W

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Sources

Netherlandsnavy.nl

Wikipedia

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Posted Image

Kortenaer during exercised in the Dutch East Indies

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I think these kinds of battles, a frantic melee of mixed ship types, will be the meat and potatoes of the game once we get going.

 

Thanks for taking the time to do these posts.

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View PostCapcon, on 14 November 2013 - 03:26 PM, said:

I think these kinds of battles, a frantic melee of mixed ship types, will be the meat and potatoes of the game once we get going.

Thanks for taking the time to do these posts.
Exactly, I can see myself screaming like a girl when playing.

gread read once again! +1

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Quote

SMS Dresden
SMS Dresden
Class: Dresden class cruiser
Armament: 10x 4.1 inch SK L/40 http://en.wikipedia...._L/40_naval_gun
2 x 19.7 inch torpedo tubes.
Captain, Herr Lüdecke
I must say, there is always time for Dresden!
I will not be talking about the class, but about a small part of history she has contributed to.
World war 1 had started, and the Dresden is ordered to sail out to South American waters to raid commerce (So she's acting as a commerce raider).
She was to operate around the River plate area, and her Captain would take the crew off merchant vessels before sinking them, the vessel followed international war laws set out for them.
She would visit Easter island during this time to refuel and take on supplies with the German taskforce she was assigned to: http://www.davidgran...14/germans.html
Then they sailed towards the Falklands area and river plate area.
The commander of the taskforce, Von Spee decided it would be better to destroy the british wireless post and coal stocks. The Captain of Dresden and other captains disagreed, but the plan went ahead.
Posted Image      
Lüdecke set sail with the squadron and they arrived at the Falklands and dropped off a landing party. Then they saw something in the distance, a menacing trail of smoke which meant a stronger British taskforce was approaching.
So you can see why Von Spee called off the operation and decided to withdraw.

And so a wild duck chase ensued, Von Spee gave the order for the light cruisers and auxiliary cruisers of his command to escape while his vessel the Scharnhorst and another armored cruiser the Gneisenau tried to hold off the superior British taskforce. The ships ended up losing the British Battlecruisers and receiving a heavy loss of life. The decision became futile because the light cruisers and armored cruisers of the British taskforce were dispatched to chase after the German vessels.
Dresden managed to make it around Cape Horn and into Chilean waters and dropped anchor in Cumberland bay. This would set the scene for her destruction.
   The end of Dresden
After weighing anchor and having the Chilean government intern the vessel, and the war for Dresden was over.
But it was not.
One of Dresden's boats spotted the British warships, and relayed the message. Lüdecke signaled that his vessel is no longer a combatant, the British ignored this and proceeded into port.
They even ignored the Chilean vessel that approached them and opened fire.
Glasgow opened up her guns first, followed by the british warship Kent. The ships knocked out Dresden's guns and this left the cruiser defenseless.
Even after messaging the British warships he was able to negotiate, the vessels continued to fire upon Lüdecke and his ship, finally he raised the white flag. And the British vessels ceased fire.
The British wanted the ship surrendered over to them, but the Germans could not, as the ship was already interned by Chile.
Posted Image
Then the bow of the Dresden exploded.
Scuttling charges had been set, and went off, flooding the vessel and sending her to the bottom of the bay.
The surviving crew were sent to an internment camp.
There was rumored to be gold on board the vessel from one of the German colonies in China. (Tsingtau)
Sea Hunters did a documentary on her, which led me to love the German vessel.
Below you can see her sailing with my other favorite German cruisers.
Posted Image
If you're wondering what the 2 cruisers with the 2 funnels are, they are Victoria Louise class cruisers, and were the subject of my first topic.
Also, have you guys noticed coincidences between this story and the KM Graf Spee and the Battle of the River Plate?
Sorry for hijacking your thread again Ari!
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Whenever ... if ever ... His JeeWeeJesness wakes up, you might have it...

 

These guys ... Now they use "work" as an excuse.  How lame!

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View PostSirDerpOfCamelot, on 14 November 2013 - 03:45 PM, said:

Oh, I have to say that has to be one of my most favorite ships, considering her story.
Sorry, no Dresden today!

View PostAriecho, on 14 November 2013 - 03:47 PM, said:

Whenever ... if ever ... His JeeWeeJesness wakes up, you might have it...

These guys ... Now they use "work" as an excuse.  How lame!
I'll try and make up a better excuse next time, ok! :trollface:

Anyway, my post is up!

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So now, JeeWeeJ thinks that he's a wizard (his quote is from LotR): A Dutchie is never late, he/she always arrives at the time he/she is supposed to...

 

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View PostAriecho, on 14 November 2013 - 04:38 PM, said:

So now, JeeWeeJ thinks that he's a wizard (his quote is from LotR): A Dutchie is never late, he/she always arrives at the time he/she is supposed to...

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Nonono, i clearly said that i'm NOT on time.. Did you forget your reading glasses again Ari? :trollface:

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View PostJeeWeeJ, on 14 November 2013 - 04:40 PM, said:

Nonono, i clearly said that i'm NOT on time.. Did you forget your reading glasses again Ari? :trollface:

No, I just have selective reading ...  The part I quoted is correct.  That's how you rewrite history, dude!

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My god, that's just harrowing, a U.S. cruiser force smacking head long into a Japanese fleet with two Kongos as its backbone.  I'd have pissed my pants.

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View PostColdt, on 14 November 2013 - 05:02 PM, said:

My god, that's just harrowing, a U.S. cruiser force smacking head long into a Japanese fleet with two Kongos as its backbone.  I'd have pissed my pants.

True, but the US force had "odd" and "even" ships!!!

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View PostColdt, on 14 November 2013 - 05:02 PM, said:

My god, that's just harrowing, a U.S. cruiser force smacking head long into a Japanese fleet with two Kongos as its backbone.  I'd have pissed my pants.
.
Well, the irony of this (and the battleship action) is basically proving that the thickness of your main belt is really no defense if some joker in a heavy cruiser is working over your topside with his main and secondary batteries. You will not be combat-effective when he gets done.

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Must be quite a sight seeing so many wrecks on Ironbottom Sound, albeit underwater. Pity they scrapped the USS Washington. Though on the bright side her sister ship, North Carolina, still exists today. I think of the Washington whenever I see her.

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Sir Derp, thank you very much for your contribution.  This is exactly in the spirit of our dailies.  We provide you with a list of events that happened on a day, give a few of our own samples, and whoever feels like writing about it just jumps on the bandwagon.  Thanks again, that's a great community service that you provided today. +1

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Awesome info fellas  :honoring:

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View PostAriecho, on 15 November 2013 - 12:49 PM, said:

Sir Derp, thank you very much for your contribution.  This is exactly in the spirit of our dailies.  We provide you with a list of events that happened on a day, give a few of our own samples, and whoever feels like writing about it just jumps on the bandwagon.  Thanks again, that's a great community service that you provided today. +1

No, thankyou! If it wasn't for you and the rest of your team, we wouldn't have presents like these to read everyday, I simply wanted to contribute a bit about her and be on my way.
It's an honor to be in a community like this one.

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Supertester
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I really hope that they have a true night battle in the game. The crazy world of firing ships, not knowing where others are, "death just out of sight" it also levels the playing field for the smaller ships. You can get in close without having the big ships pound you to death LOL

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