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leova

Wargaming, how much is your Honor worth?

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And tog is around 20$, what your point?

  • Cool 2

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And tog is around 20$, what your point?

 

 

 

 

 

It would appear that the OP's point is that something was promised for payment. That promised is not being honoured.

 

What has the Tog to do with this issue?

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Well, like 16.21 x unknown amount of humblebundlers...

 

But unless like, upwards of 1000 people actually redeemed it, 16k is a paltry amount of money to risk a PR shitstorm for. 

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It would appear that the OP's point is that something was promised for payment. That promised is not being honoured.

 

What has the Tog to do with this issue?

Was using tog to compare prices. 16$ is not much for a tier 5

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Was using tog to compare prices. 16$ is not much for a tier 5

 

again that is NOT the issue

 

WG is lying and defrauding us to try and sell a $16 ship, its sick

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again that is NOT the issue

 

WG is lying and defrauding us to try and sell a $16 ship, its sick

what did you expect? not to sell their premium ships?

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again that is NOT the issue

 

WG is lying and defrauding us to try and sell a $16 ship, its sick

 

How much did you donate to the charity?

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what did you expect? not to sell their premium ships?

 

I think people expect not to be lied to and ripped off, and not trolled when they make a valid complaint about an unethical (and probably illegal) action by a company.

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2 irrelevant troll replies above, nothing to do with anything

 

*sigh* 

Edit: not Barahur, the ones above!

Edited by leova

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what did you expect? not to sell their premium ships?

 

Well, ummm what leo is really trying to say is that currently the people who purchased the Murmansk, haven't gotten it. NVM, read into it, all I can do is:

facepalm30.gif

Edited by ajapanzer5

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Not sure if the fanboys are aware, but you guys are supporting fraud by supporting wargaming regarding this whole E3 incident regardless if its just a dollar. It may not affect you right now but in the long run when companies gets away with fraud they will do it again and you may not be as lucky the next time they commit their fraud so think about that.

Edited by FluxCapacitor

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Not sure if the fanboys are aware, but you guys are supporting fraud by supporting wargaming regarding this whole E3 incident regardless if its just a dollar.

 

Fanbois don't care. Unless it affects them directly. Then they would be screaming and jumping up and down louder than any of us.

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Have to agree, makes no difference if its a dollar or one hundred dollars, it appears people were mislead and lied to about what they bought and what they are getting.   Best way to deal with it imo is keeping the wallets closed and take the message main stream.   Bad press will cost these people 1000 fold over what a few premmies would.

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Truth In Advertising

 

 

When consumers see or hear an advertisement, whether it’s on the Internet, radio or television, or anywhere else, federal law says that ad must be truthful, not misleading, and, when appropriate, backed by scientific evidence. The Federal Trade Commission enforces these truth-in-advertising laws, and it applies the same standards no matter where an ad appears – in newspapers and magazines, online, in the mail, or on billboards or buses. The FTC looks especially closely at advertising claims that can affect consumers’ health or their pocketbooks – claims about food, over-the-counter drugs, dietary supplements, alcohol, and tobacco and on conduct related to high-tech products and the Internet. The FTC also monitors and writes reports about ad industry practices regarding the marketing of alcohol and tobacco.

When the FTC finds a case of fraud perpetrated on consumers, the agency files actions in federal district court for immediate and permanent orders to stop scams; prevent fraudsters from perpetrating scams in the future; freeze their assets; and get compensation for victims.

 

 

General Offers and Claims — Products and Services

The Federal Trade Commission Act allows the FTC to act in the interest of all consumers to prevent deceptive and unfair acts or practices. In interpreting Section 5 of the Act, the Commission has determined that a representation, omission or practice is deceptive if it is likely to:

  • mislead consumers and 
  • affect consumers' behavior or decisions about the product or service.

In addition, an act or practice is unfair if the injury it causes, or is likely to cause, is:

  • substantial
  • not outweighed by other benefits and
  • not reasonably avoidable.

The FTC Act prohibits unfair or deceptive advertising in any medium. That is, advertising must tell the truth and not mislead consumers. A claim can be misleading if relevant information is left out or if the claim implies something that's not true. For example, a lease advertisement for an automobile that promotes "$0 Down" may be misleading if significant and undisclosed charges are due at lease signing.

In addition, claims must be substantiated, especially when they concern health, safety, or performance. The type of evidence may depend on the product, the claims, and what experts believe necessary. If your ad specifies a certain level of support for a claim - "tests show X" - you must have at least that level of support.

Sellers are responsible for claims they make about their products and services. Third parties - such as advertising agencies or website designers and catalog marketers - also may be liable for making or disseminating deceptive representations if they participate in the preparation or distribution of the advertising, or know about the deceptive claims.

  • Advertising agencies or website designers are responsible for reviewing the information used to substantiate ad claims. They may not simply rely on an advertiser's assurance that the claims are substantiated. In determining whether an ad agency should be held liable, the FTC looks at the extent of the agency's participation in the preparation of the challenged ad, and whether the agency knew or should have known that the ad included false or deceptive claims.

  • To protect themselves, catalog marketers should ask for material to back up claims rather than repeat what the manufacturer says about the product. If the manufacturer doesn't come forward with proof or turns over proof that looks questionable, the catalog marketer should see a yellow "caution light" and proceed appropriately, especially when it comes to extravagant performance claims, health or weight loss promises, or earnings guarantees. In writing ad copy, catalogers should stick to claims that can be supported. Most important, catalog marketers should trust their instincts when a product sounds too good to be true.

Other points to consider:

  • Disclaimers and disclosures must be clear and conspicuous. That is, consumers must be able to notice, read or hear, and understand the information. Still, a disclaimer or disclosure alone usually is not enough to remedy a false or deceptive claim.

  • Demonstrations must show how the product will perform under normal use.

  • Refunds must be made to dissatisfied consumers - if you promised to make them.

  • Advertising directed to children raises special issues. That's because children may have greater difficulty evaluating advertising claims and understanding the nature of the information you provide. Sellers should take special care not to misrepresent a product or its performance when advertising to children. The Children's Advertising Review Unit (CARU) of the Council of Better Business Bureaus has published specific guidelines for children's advertising that you may find helpful.

Dot Com Disclosures: Information About Online Advertising, an FTC staff paper, provides additional information for online advertisers. The paper discusses the factors used to evaluate the clarity and conspicuousness of required disclosures in online ads. It also discusses how certain FTC rules and guides that use terms like "writing" or "printed" apply to Internet activities and how technologies such as email may be used to comply with certain rules and guides.           

 

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