Higgle

Armor Angling

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In this brief guide, I will be covering armour angling. This works best for battleships and is an important part of battleship play, but this goes for all ships with some actual armour, cruisers included. Not angling yourself will get you killed quickly, painfully and frustratingly.

 

So, why is angling important? Well, angling your ship does two things for you. One, it gives the enemy a smaller profile to shoot at, and chances are that they'll miss more shots when firing at an angled ship. Two, it increases armor effectiveness, just like in World of Tanks. If you don't angle, expect to have your citadel (vital machinery bits of your ship) frequently penetrated. Before you ask, yes, angling a ship for increased armor effectiveness does have a basis in history.

 

For the pictures in this guide, I have used this base image of the Yamato, which I have edited over with colour to show the citadel (red) and the main armour belt (green).

 

post-1002247859-0-54940900-1423077848.jp

 


 

1. Never, ever present your flat broadside to an enemy if possible. Your flat side will be easily penetrated by enemy guns, especially the bigger ones, and you will have a very bad time.

 

post-1002247859-0-25304500-1423077864.jp

 

 

2. This is why armour angling—turning your ship relative to enemy guns—is important. Putting on a bit of angle helps, but sometimes it may not be enough.

 

post-1002247859-0-15017800-1423077970.jp

 

 

3. For maximum damage reduction, an even tighter angle might be required.

 

post-1002247859-0-23118600-1423077976.jp

 

 

4. However, put on too great an angle, and enemy shells will start penetrating the front of your superstructure and through your relatively thin internal decks, or through your relatively thin forward bulkheads (walls) and into your citadel. Here, the enemy shells are coming in towards you head-on.

 

post-1002247859-0-34150600-1423078074.jp

 

 

5. So what is the optimal angle? In most cases, the best angle is the heaviest angle you can put on while still being able to bring all guns to bear at the enemy. However, this can change depending on scenario and ship.

 

post-1002247859-0-54226200-1423078176.jp

 

Edited by Higgle

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5. So what is the optimal angle? In most cases, the best angle is the heaviest angle you can put on while still being able to bring all guns to bear at the enemy. However, this can change depending on scenario.

 

... and ship. Some ships will be able to aim their guns further than others:

 

2ljibd1.jpg

 

The top ship's rear turret can't turn as far as the bottom ship's rear turret. Ergo, if you angle the top ship so that you can still get all your guns on target, you won't be angled enough to bounce much incoming fire.

 

So while OP's advice is sound, keep the maximum aiming angle of your turrets into account when deciding how far to angle. Sometimes it's better to give up a turret for better angling; you'll live longer and thus do more damage that way.

 

 


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... and ship. Some ships will be able to aim their guns further than others:

 

-snip-

 

The top ship's rear turret can't turn as far as the bottom ship's rear turret. Ergo, if you angle the top ship so that you can still get all your guns on target, you won't be angled enough to bounce much incoming fire.

 

So while OP's advice is sound, keep the maximum aiming angle of your turrets into account when deciding how far to angle. Sometimes it's better to give up a turret for better angling; you'll live longer and thus do more damage that way.

 

Yup, this. Consider this an extension to the guide, if you will. :popcorn:


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It should be noted that ships with long range attacks ships will be dropping their shells nearly vertically onto you, bypassing most of your armor belt.  If you're in a BB, another option is to know the reload times of your opponent and change your speed just before they fire (or just as  their ranging shot lands if they play that way).  This won't help you against a cruiser or destroyer, but can make all the difference against another BB, where 1-2 shells can make the difference.  Another thing to take into account is the guns shoot in a line.  the guns to the left of the camera land left, and guns right of the camera land right, stitching a line.  If you align your angle pseudo-perpendicular to your opponent, their broadsides will land perpendicular to your ship, in an X pattern.  this will reduce the shells you take.  To compensate for yourself, don't volley fire.  Know the order your guns are firing in and fire one at a time manually adjusting each gun to compensate for the offset.


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To sound off here as well...

 

The American Battleships: North Carolina, Iowa, and Montana  all require a high degree of angling due to the nature of American Battleship armoring (Thick in the middle, and thin on the ends). If you try to bring these BB's rear gun(s) to bear, or if undertaking a strategic withdraw the second (and even possibly the first) front turret(s), my experience in both CBT and now OBT is that your enemy is targeting these softer Citadel targets (artillery magazines), and you will not only get penetrated, but more than likely take a massive Citadel hit to boot.

 

For those up and coming American Battleship Captains that are currently using New York's, New Mexico's, or the unenviable Colorado (bear with it ... trust me the NC is totally worth it), you'll have to experiment and try out your angling. But again, my personal experience has been that the Tier VIII, IX, X Battleships don't do well with angling less than (roughly) 80 degrees to 100 degrees (depending on your approach being Port or Starboard).

 

At these higher degrees, you can really see the angling benefits of these ships without feeling your armor is paper thin.

 

I also think this is why some folks might misunderstand and think that American BB's are paper and give up on them too soon...

 

Anyway, that's been my experience having played extensively in all three of the top Tier American Battleships. Otherwise nice guide, definitely appreciated!

Edited by KSN

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Excellent post and images thanks. Now to put this information into real time game play is the hard part. 


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thank for ur info very helpful. bbs are my 2nd class been playing just after cbt lanch. but I find this a very good post and will start trying to use it more again thank you


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Very good explanation.

 

Works well until you find a good pair of captains that gang up on you at 90deg angles. No matter which one you angle against, you show your broadside to the other one. When the enemies are either just one, or two but close together, it works well.


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Ive mainly played DDs and just started CAs, but more recently ive been playing BBs and getting wrecked. thanks for the advice on how to play it better.


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Personally my issue is that I cant tell by looking how much is to much and how little is too little angling I really feel like a Angle meter is needed in the games UI to tell a player just what angle their hull is at right now They could make it an optional one so that people learning How to angle will use it and those players who know how to tell the best angles at a glance can turn it off 


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