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RoentgenMD

6000+ wrecks dot the seabed from WW2

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I think the worst wreck is the one in the Thames Estuary which is a munitions ship.

 

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On 4/11/2022 at 3:32 AM, BrushWolf said:

I think the worst wreck is the one in the Thames Estuary which is a munitions ship.

 

 

yeah. I've read/heard about that one.

Ships in deep water, all it'll do is leak oil and if anything explodes, only the fishes will know.

That one in the Thames, if it goes, the towns around it are going to get the brunt of it.

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10 hours ago, Lord_Slayer said:

That one in the Thames, if it goes, the towns around it are going to get the brunt of it.

More than just the towns around it, London would get slammed by that man made tsunami.

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How badly does WW-II vintage explosive degrade over time, and what are the likely results of the explosive being exposed to seawater?

I understand that not every ordnance will have the same explosive material.  Different warheads used different stuff, and formulas for production varied over the course of time.

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On 4/22/2022 at 9:18 PM, Wolfswetpaws said:

How badly does WW-II vintage explosive degrade over time, and what are the likely results of the explosive being exposed to seawater?

While not sure of the exact type of bombs on board, Wiki lists 2,000lb and 1,000lb bombs, they could be Comb B bombs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_65_bomb

The Forrestal fire did have some vintage bombs involved (stamped 1953). According to the wiki on the fire, Comp B can become more powerful (up to 50% by weight) if old or stored improperly.

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On 4/24/2022 at 3:44 PM, Lord_Slayer said:

While not sure of the exact type of bombs on board, Wiki lists 2,000lb and 1,000lb bombs, they could be Comb B bombs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_65_bomb

The Forrestal fire did have some vintage bombs involved (stamped 1953). According to the wiki on the fire, Comp B can become more powerful (up to 50% by weight) if old or stored improperly.

Interesting.

I'm curious about how being exposed to water and/or seawater affects the explosive.
My search turned-up an article explaining that said Comp-B was nonhyroscopic.
But, I didn't immediately find articles explaining what happends when ordnance rusts away and the explosives are exposed to water.
 

Quote

"...
Composition B / Comp B

Comp B explosives are made from TNT, RDX, and wax, such as 59.5 percent RDX, 39.5 percent TNT and 1 percent wax. Desensitizing agents are added. Composition B is used by the military in land mines, rockets and projectiles. Cast Composition B has a specific gravity of 1.65 and a detonation velocity of 'about 25,000 fps and is used as a primer and booster for blasting agents.

Composition B is a mixture of 59% RDX, 40% TNT, and 1% wax. The TNT reduces the sensitivity of the RDX to a safe degree and, because of its melting point, allows the material to be cast-loaded. The blast energy of Composition B is slightly higher than that of TNT. Composition B is nonhygroscopic and remains stable in stowage. It has an extremely high-shaped-charge efficiency. The velocity of detonation is approximately 24,000 fps, and its color ranges from yellow to brown. Composition B has been used as a more powerful replacement for TNT in loading some of the rifle grenades and some rocket heads. It can be used where an explosive with more power and brisance is of tactical advantage and there is no objection to a slight increase of sensitivity. While no longer used in newer gun projectiles, some older stocks may be found with Composition B main charges.  ..."

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/munitions/explosives-compositions.htm

 

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38 minutes ago, Wolfswetpaws said:


I'm curious about how being exposed to water and/or seawater affects the explosive.
My search turned-up an article explaining that said Comp-B was nonhyroscopic.
But, I didn't immediately find articles explaining what happends when ordnance rusts away and the explosives are exposed to water.

 

closest I can think of are the ships at Bikini.
They all had ammo on board (or loaded aircraft). Not near the amount on board the cargo ship, but enough that the divers have been cautious.

We also have cases in Germany where live bombs have been recovered  in various places. Though buried under the ground and being exposed to seawater are two different things, those bombs do still give off quite the explosion when intentionally detonated.

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:cap_hmm:

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