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handybilly

Ok, what the hell is this thing?

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I would say it's used to shoot a line to another boat to tie up next to for fueling transferring supplies.

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1 minute ago, Singularity_invader said:

You are correct.

We just used a rifle on our ship.

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52 minutes ago, Singularity_invader said:

You are correct.

that explains a similar gun on HMS Campbeltown

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I think it's a dummy mount for the 5"/38 so crews can practice its reloading and operation.

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5 minutes ago, Lampshade_M1A2 said:

I think it's a dummy mount for the 5"/38 so crews can practice its reloading and operation.

Old navy coves can answer, but I doubt that there would space for a practice anything.  Practice would be on real guns, with empty casing clips if anything. (Me guesses).

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It is in fact a 5"38 practice loader. Most WW2 ships had them.

Here's some pictures and stories: http://www.destroyers.org/photos/p-dd-479.htm

http://www.ussyorktownstories.com/HotShellman.htm

Scroll down to the bottom of this one for a PDF: http://www.navsource.org/archives/01/57x.htm

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5 hours ago, dEsTurbed1 said:

I would say it's used to shoot a line to another boat to tie up next to for fueling transferring supplies.

Nope. The US Navy used, and still uses, shot lines (a messenger fired from a modified rifle) or good old heaving lines (a messenger with a heavy monkeys fist on the end) for passing lines between vessels.

Some navies, coast guards, and civilian operators have special line-throwing equipment for rescue work, docking, etc. but the USN sticks to the tried and true.

It is in fact a 5" loading drill device, as rustydawg states. My ship had one of these amidships between our two Mk 37 Mod 0 5"/38 mounts.

Edited by Froggy_McFrogface
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Without little men on the ships to scale things I think that a lot of WOWS players don't realize just how big even "tiny" 5" guns are and how much practice and maintenance was required to operate them and keep them serviceable.

The Loading Machine was important in order for the 5-inch crews to develop the proper skills and muscle memory needed to rapidly load the guns. I'm not familiar with 5-inch guns per se but I spent a few years around 8-inch artillery in the Army.

From the US Navy Operating Instructions for the 5-inch (38 caliber) gun. February 1943 edition.

Quote

 

4. Drill.-Practice ramming on the loading machine until you can do it without having to think out each separate step. As you acquire skill through practice it will become easier-but don't get overconfident. Keep anticipating trouble. Stay alert! On a 5-inch gun anything can happen!

Check-off. Now you are ready to take over as rammerman on a 5-inch gun. You have practiced on the loading machine for 10 hours and more. Today you will act as rammerman, and we will actually load and fire the gun.

Conduct frequent AA loading drills with the muzzle end of the loading machine elevated or elevating through 45 degrees. As the breech is depressed you will note three important changes in the loading and ramming procedure

Practice loading projectiles into the loading machine just as you would practice for any other big game. Only-put more effort into it. The stakes in the game are the highest -- your life and the lives of your shipmates.

Position.-Take position on the left side of the loading machine, facing toward the muzzle end, with your feet about 12 inches apart. Your right foot is used as a pivot, so place it so that when you turn towards the gun your body will be about even with the center of the gun tray. Your back will touch the powder loader's back. Don't let it worry you. You will have to learn to work closely together in order to load smoothly. Practice pivoting-on the ball of the right foot-from fuze pot to gun and back again, without a shell, until you find the best spot for your right foot.

https://maritime.org/doc/destroyer/fiveinch/index.htm

 

 

Edited by Snargfargle
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44 minutes ago, Froggy_McFrogface said:

Nope. The US Navy used, and still uses, shot lines (a messenger fired from a modified rifle) or good old heaving lines (a messenger with a heavy monkeys fist on the end) for passing lines between vessels.

Some navies, coast guards, and civilian operators have special line-throwing equipment for rescue work, docking, etc. but the USN sticks to the tried and true.

It is in fact a 5" loading drill device, as rustydawg states. My ship had one of these amidships between our two Mk 37 Mod 0 5"/38 mounts.

Can confirm. Don't know if it's still there, but there was one of these in the "Green House" Gunner's Mate A School at Great Lakes NTC.

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2 hours ago, Snargfargle said:

Without little men on the ships to scale things I think that a lot of WOWS players don't realize just how big even "tiny" 5" guns are

Correct.

Abrams_M1A2_SEPV3_21_Dec_2020.5fe0bd583a

cb482ded904101ecfeb62e8d3a3b949f.jpg

These are 4.7" guns.

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The duh answer is Paravane.  :) 

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10 minutes ago, Lert said:

Correct.

Abrams_M1A2_SEPV3_21_Dec_2020.5fe0bd583a

cb482ded904101ecfeb62e8d3a3b949f.jpg

These are 4.7" guns.

Isn't it amazing that the largest tank guns were just DD guns in WW2 (or at least for most of the war)?  That really puts this stuff into perspective.

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4 minutes ago, kyesac said:

Isn't it amazing that the largest tank guns were just DD guns in WW2 (or at least for most of the war)?  That really puts this stuff into perspective.

I get what you're saying and you're not wrong, but these 120s aren't the largest tank guns, there have been series produced, have-served, have-fought-in-a-war tanks with 152s / 6" guns :)

KV-2_Moscow.jpg

Edited by Lert
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German tanks have a way to go yet still. If they needed to deploy to the old historical invasion, they will find about 2 to 300 tanks with varying degrees of gripes able to go. The rest will rot in shops until captured.

You will find old monsters like the Kirov Platform undergoring a rebuild. Instead of 20 old missiles to kill carriers from the moon, they might be able to pack it with almost a thousand missiles t hat can kill a US Carrier group after it has run out of missiles in a hour. We are also making some awesome changes ourselves but a little bit late, running behind and a dollar short alreaydy.

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Ive got the complete victory at sea collection and one tape it holds a Russian Navy forces warships going out with T34 turrets or other related weapons emplacements that are pretty much whatever they can find and weld to the thing, man it and off they go seeking glory.To call these warships is somewhat necessary because they flew navy flags and operated as such. But you can imagine the differences that will now have to be quickly learned by a landlubber tank crew suddenly on something very big and floaty.

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3 hours ago, Froggy_McFrogface said:

Nope. The US Navy used, and still uses, shot lines (a messenger fired from a modified rifle) or good old heaving lines (a messenger with a heavy monkeys fist on the end) for passing lines between vessels.

Some navies, coast guards, and civilian operators have special line-throwing equipment for rescue work, docking, etc. but the USN sticks to the tried and true.

It is in fact a 5" loading drill device, as rustydawg states. My ship had one of these amidships between our two Mk 37 Mod 0 5"/38 mounts.

One fun fact is, in WWII the most common rifle modified for line throwing in the USN was the old 1800's vintage Springfield Trapdoor rifle, which began it's life as a breechloading conversion for rifle-muskets immediately after the US Civil War. I have an Italian made repro Model 1873 carbine and an original Model 1884 rifle and I have to say, it's my favorite single shot action. It's a lot of fun to operate and you can get surprisingly fast with it with practice.

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6 hours ago, rustydawg said:

It is in fact a 5"38 practice loader. Most WW2 ships had them.

Here's some pictures and stories: http://www.destroyers.org/photos/p-dd-479.htm

http://www.ussyorktownstories.com/HotShellman.htm

Scroll down to the bottom of this one for a PDF: http://www.navsource.org/archives/01/57x.htm

Live and learn!

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12 hours ago, handybilly said:

Noticed it on my Monaghan and have no clue. Anyone?

dd.jpg

Looks like a reloaded but also looks like a statue or manikin as well.

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3 hours ago, Lert said:

I get what you're saying and you're not wrong, but these 120s aren't the largest tank guns, there have been series produced, have-served, have-fought-in-a-war tanks with 152s / 6" guns :)

KV-2_Moscow.jpg

Ardeer Aggie 300mm says hi

uul7mk4.jpg

fun fact that abomination failed the trials becouse of the high risk of injuries for the crew and the troops behind the tank each time it fired

Edited by pepe_trueno

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24 minutes ago, pepe_trueno said:

Ardeer Aggie 300mm says hi

I'm sure there were experimental tanks with even bigger guns, design plans etc, but IIRC KV-2 is the largest caliber tank that was ever put in service, series produced and fought in a war. Though I could be wrong still.

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4 hours ago, Lert said:

Correct. These are 4.7" guns.

My unit fielded these 8-inch guns. Some of the shells we fired were dated 1945. That was after both Korea and Vietnam so the US must have had a million of those things stockpiled at the end of WWII.

h3.jpg

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4 hours ago, xHeavy said:

tank crew suddenly on something very big and floaty.

Several years back I ran across an article about a US ship that actually had a some Marine-crewed weapons platforms strapped to its deck because they were better at what they did than anything the Navy had at the time.

Edited by Snargfargle

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