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Lord_Slayer

End of the USS Ticonderoga CG-47

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Such an odd looking ship class. It feels like an old metal lunch box or maybe a giant dumbbell with square weights bolted onto a ship hull. I do prefer the look of the Arleigh Burke.

Still a pretty good workhorse class of ship.

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Damn...

Hard to believe the Ticonderogas are actually reaching the end of their service lives.

Wild to think I was just barely out of high school when they came out.

Red Storm Rising was such great press for that ship.

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That class cruiser was the mainstay of the fleet when I was in young as well. It served during the Cold War with great distinction. The class while odd in appearance, was the final transition phase in USN development of cruisers. 

The Arleigh Burke would be Ticonderoga's successor. And the lessons, innovations, and testing of Ticonderoga class paved the way. 

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Fun fact, the hull is steel and the big boxy superstructure is aluminum. 

In order to join them, they had to make special metal plates. They put a sheet of steel and laid a sheet of aluminum on top (or vice versa). Then lined the sheets with explosives and actually blasted the two sheets together to join them.

They then cut that into strips and used those at the transition from hull to superstructure. Weld the steel part to steel and aluminum to aluminum.

 

 

 

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On 2/25/2021 at 11:46 PM, Estimated_Prophet said:

Damn...

Hard to believe the Ticonderogas are actually reaching the end of their service lives.

Wild to think I was just barely out of high school when they came out.

Red Storm Rising was such great press for that ship.

Well, the first batch of Tycos have been out of service for a while. It wasn't worth rebuilding them with a VLS. The later VLS equipped ships will be around for a while.

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Ticonderoga has been scrapped in texas...

So 3 have been scrapped 1 sunk as a target and 1 awaiting disposal.

11 More are planned too be decommissioned  the next 5 years.

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On 5/20/2021 at 4:55 AM, Grapefruitcannon said:

Ticonderoga has been scrapped in texas...

So 3 have been scrapped 1 sunk as a target and 1 awaiting disposal.

11 More are planned too be decommissioned  the next 5 years.

USS Yorktown (the 1 awaiting disposal), which I believe was the ship that prototyped the smart ship control system.

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On 5/19/2021 at 10:48 AM, Koyangi said:

Fun fact, the hull is steel and the big boxy superstructure is aluminum. 

A bit off-topic, but here's another fact, this is what happens when a fire melts your aluminum superstructure:

The USS Belknap after a collision with the USS John F Kenedy. The collision  started a fire which set off the ammunition stores and melted the  superstructure of the ship. : WarshipPorn

USS Belknap collided with the John F. Kennedy, a fire broke out, and this was the result. I believe it was after this incident that aluminum superstructures were changed into steel ones.

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On 5/19/2021 at 7:48 AM, Koyangi said:

Fun fact, the hull is steel and the big boxy superstructure is aluminum. 

In order to join them, they had to make special metal plates. They put a sheet of steel and laid a sheet of aluminum on top (or vice versa). Then lined the sheets with explosives and actually blasted the two sheets together to join them.

They then cut that into strips and used those at the transition from hull to superstructure. Weld the steel part to steel and aluminum to aluminum.

 

 

 

Or, many components used a ground bond with a "button" about an inch in diameter that was bonded steel / aluminum made using friction welding.  How do I know?  A shop I ran in the Navy made a bunch.  We had a lathe (a Reed-Prentice left over from WW 2) set up with a hydraulic jack attached to the tailstock to press the two components together using the rotation of the lathe to create the friction.  The resulting bead was then turned to diameter and parted off.  The steel side then got drilled and threaded to take the bolt holding the ground strap.

 Inertia Friction Welding Demonstration - Manufacturing Technology, Inc. - YouTube

Same thing.  We used 1 1/4" diameter rod

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9 hours ago, SaiIor_Moon said:

A bit off-topic, but here's another fact, this is what happens when a fire melts your aluminum superstructure:

The USS Belknap after a collision with the USS John F Kenedy. The collision  started a fire which set off the ammunition stores and melted the  superstructure of the ship. : WarshipPorn

USS Belknap collided with the John F. Kennedy, a fire broke out, and this was the result. I believe it was after this incident that aluminum superstructures were changed into steel ones.

Nope, Aluminum continued to be used.  Most of it is 5052 H32 unless splinter protection was specified then 5052 H38 was the choice.  Those are the most resistant to corrosion in a marine environment.  H38 can't be welded though.  Like 7076 it crystalizes when welded causing a very weak joint to form.

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On 5/29/2021 at 3:19 PM, SaiIor_Moon said:

A bit off-topic, but here's another fact, this is what happens when a fire melts your aluminum superstructure:

The USS Belknap after a collision with the USS John F Kenedy. The collision  started a fire which set off the ammunition stores and melted the  superstructure of the ship. : WarshipPorn

USS Belknap collided with the John F. Kennedy, a fire broke out, and this was the result. I believe it was after this incident that aluminum superstructures were changed into steel ones.

 

On 5/30/2021 at 1:13 AM, Murotsu said:

Nope, Aluminum continued to be used.  Most of it is 5052 H32 unless splinter protection was specified then 5052 H38 was the choice.  Those are the most resistant to corrosion in a marine environment.  H38 can't be welded though.  Like 7076 it crystalizes when welded causing a very weak joint to form.

 

I had thought it was a combination of the Royal Navy's Falkland experience and the Belknap. The Exocet missile strike on the USS Stark was just icing that re-enforced the steel decision.

The Ticonderogas and Spruences were all already built or their design 'set' and under construction, thus had the steel aluminum combination.
Arleigh Burkes returned to all steel.
 

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23 minutes ago, Lord_Slayer said:

 

 

I had thought it was a combination of the Royal Navy's Falkland experience and the Belknap. The Exocet missile strike on the USS Stark was just icing that re-enforced the steel decision.

The Ticonderogas and Spruences were all already built or their design 'set' and under construction, thus had the steel aluminum combination.
Arleigh Burkes returned to all steel.
 

Well at the very least, the Belknap incident was used in favor of the argument to switch to steel superstructure, and it probably was not the ONLY reason, yes.

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