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Tzarevitch

PSA - Cool video on steering positions on a BB

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This may be interesting for some people. It's a short video by the curator of the BB New Jersey Museum going over all of the steering positions on an Iowa class BB. He even goes down into the bowels to show how the ship can be manually steered with its rudders. It's interesting to see how much redundancy and armor goes into preventing loss of steering control on a BB.  He has a whole series of interesting similar videos if people want to subscribe. There's also a very good one going over what the USN did not like about the Iowas and would likely have changed in the last two which were never completed (Illinois and Kentucky) which I also linked below. 

 

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Oh yea, the amount of steering redundancies USN ships have is amazing(5 on my former ship). Fun time!

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2 hours ago, Tzarevitch said:

Gotta avoid the Bismarck scenario. lol.

The Bismarck was a magic bb and it doesn't matter how many steering positions you have if the rudder is jammed.

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9 minutes ago, BrushWolf said:

The Bismarck was a magic bb and it doesn't matter how many steering positions you have if the rudder is jammed.

Later German ships would be designed with rudders with explosive bolts so it does appear to be a design oversight.  Bismarck's demise even influenced the design of Yamato's auxiliary rudder although Japan's test of the Bismarck scenario showed that Yamato's auxiliary rudder alone was unable to stop the momentum of a turn once started.

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4 minutes ago, Sventex said:

Later German ships would be designed with rudders with explosive bolts so it does appear to be a design oversight.  Bismarck's demise even influenced the design of Yamato's auxiliary rudder although Japan's test of the Bismarck scenario showed that Yamato's auxiliary rudder alone was unable to stop the momentum of a turn once started.

Yeah, a lot of changes were made to the Tirpitz and other ships of the Kriegsmarine from the Bismarck's experience, the AA gunnery computers were updated to deal with the extremely slow loaded speed of the Swordfish and as you pointed out explosive bolts for rudders among other things.

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6 hours ago, BrushWolf said:

The Bismarck was a magic bb and it doesn't matter how many steering positions you have if the rudder is jammed.

True, it wouldn't matter for Bismarck because of her design and where she was hit. Bismarck only had three shafts and because of that could not steer at all without using her rudders. They knew that when they tested her after she was built. The triple screw design also required the two rudders to be placed too close together so they could both be disabled by a single torpedo hit, which is pretty much what happened. Other ships would have done much better with that hit and likely would not have been completely unable to steer. An Iowa with 4 shafts could have used her engines for emergency steering even if both rudders were destroyed or jammed. They are also more separated than Bismarck's and as I recall they have an armored bulkhead between them to minimize losing both. Vittorio Veneto (Roma's sister ship) was another 4 screw design. She took a torpedo in her stern at the Battle of Cape Matapan, similar to Bismarck. The outermost port side screw was blown apart and the port most rudder and inboard port screw were jammed and non-functional, but she could still move and steer enough to limp to safety by controlling the power to her other two screws and manually controlling the remaining rudders (she had two big and one small rudder) from an auxiliary control stations in the other rudder post rooms. Here's a picture of her in drydock afterward. You can see the giant hole and the missing shaft.

Spoiler

g01pfc0mnv401.jpg

 

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