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Ducky_shot

Why does the game require WGC to be installed before you can uninstall it??

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You must install something on your computer to be able to uninstall a program. Sounds legit.

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Probably required to remove the bitcoin generating rootkit that they placed on your computer.

At least, that would be my first guess.

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I've seen this often when uninstalling apps. This is a good reason to keep your anti-virus/malware apps up to date.

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It's useful to build in "features" such as this that create dependencies that give the "necessity" of requiring things like WGC to be installed on your computer a little more technical credence.

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Interesting question Ducky ... but lets talk about anti-CV 3 man divisions made up of two AA build Kidds and an Akizuki for DPM against cruisers and battleships instead.

 

I'll see myself out now .... :cap_rambo:

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Well... you COULD manually delete everything obviously installed, visible things based on direct visual evidence. There are, however, likely more than one thing not so easily viewed that was also "installed", things potentially tied to many aspects of your PC. The argument would be "to ensure the application uninstalls properly, we need the installation code to find everything to uninstall". 

Arguments would further proceed about the efficacy of doing it all manually. 

Windows has always had this "arrangement"; if you installed software but then manually removed some pieces, then determined you wanted to remove everything, the uninstall would fail. 

I'll just park my car here in this spot over here, marked "Windows is not an OOOS". What's that? 

Windows is not an object-oriented operating system. It is a cluster**** of code from way back when Bill Gates thought he could code. :cap_haloween:

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Maybe the logic is that if you are really going to uninstall, at least you'll have (or forget to remove) WGC there if you decide to reinstall one day.

Kind of like keeping an old photo of an ex-girlfriend, just in case.

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6 minutes ago, Ace_04 said:

 

Kind of like keeping an old photo of an ex-girlfriend, just in case.

Don't really need that with all the free "stuff" on the internet these days.

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Because the WGC is required to play our titles now across the board, so it is written to require the WGC to ensure all files are removed properly. This is pretty normal for games and publishers that have launchers as a requirement. This is NOT something new.

So if you want to uninstall the program that requires the launcher just install it, then remove the programs and uninstall the launcher.

-Hapa

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On my main computer, I used the uninstall function in the Control Panel, and WOWS, WOWS PT, and WOT all uninstalled without a hitch and without demanding WGC installation.    

Maybe it depends on when you installed the game originally or something. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Hapa_Fodder said:

it is written to require the WGC to ensure all files are removed properly. This is pretty normal for games and publishers that have launchers as a requirement. This is NOT something new.

What would be new is if it actually worked.
Uninstall programs are always leaving behind errant files, and ESSPECIALLY registry entries.
I've seen lots of them that don't even touch the registry.
Hey, most users don't even know what that is, so let's save 1 hour's worth of work and add to
the problem of registry clogging, which 'will' slow down your computer if you get too much stuff in it.

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24 minutes ago, z9_ said:

What would be new is if it actually worked.
Uninstall programs are always leaving behind errant files, and ESSPECIALLY registry entries.
I've seen lots of them that don't even touch the registry.
Hey, most users don't even know what that is, so let's save 1 hour's worth of work and add to
the problem of registry clogging, which 'will' slow down your computer if you get too much stuff in it.

Yes this is true for all apps thought TBH, this is why windows (though not the greatest) has registry cleanup programs, I myself have a separate app that does registry checks along with virus checks on the regular.

-Hapa

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40 minutes ago, Hapa_Fodder said:

it is written to require the WGC to ensure all files are removed properly. This is pretty normal for games and publishers that have launchers as a requirement. This is NOT something new.

Yup. This is an artifact of how Windows manages software. When something is installed, it copies files in several places on the drive. It relies on certain other software in order to run. If those programs are missing, then it installs them too. This becomes a tangle. The solution is to use something like InstallShield and keep a catalogue (and that has its own problems managing dependencies) or distribute a program to manage the uninstallation.

Macs keep each program in a separate directory structure, including many dependencies. It's elegant because you can just delete the directory to remove everything that was installed. It's inelegant because you have multiple copies of multiple versions of dependencies, and there's no central way to patch bugs and security problems.

Linux takes a similar approach to Windows. One can use chroot or Docker to make it more Mac-like, but that opens many other cans of worms.

22 minutes ago, z9_ said:

What would be new is if it actually worked.
registry clogging, which 'will' slow down your computer if you get too much stuff in it.

Citations needed.
Windows uninstallers don't work, or just WarGaming's uninstaller doesn't work?
The registry is a database, not plumbing; how does it get "clogged?" And how does a larger registry actually slow down a computer? 

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4 minutes ago, imaginary_b said:

Yup. This is an artifact of how Windows manages software. When something is installed, it copies files in several places on the drive. It relies on certain other software in order to run. If those programs are missing, then it installs them too. This becomes a tangle. The solution is to use something like InstallShield and keep a catalogue (and that has its own problems managing dependencies) or distribute a program to manage the uninstallation.

Macs keep each program in a separate directory structure, including many dependencies. It's elegant because you can just delete the directory to remove everything that was installed. It's inelegant because you have multiple copies of multiple versions of dependencies, and there's no central way to patch bugs and security problems.

Linux takes a similar approach to Windows. One can use chroot or Docker to make it more Mac-like, but that opens many other cans of worms.

Citations needed.
Windows uninstallers don't work, or just WarGaming's uninstaller doesn't work?
The registry is a database, not plumbing; how does it get "clogged?" And how does a larger registry actually slow down a computer? 

TBH, this is an issue that Windows forced on software a long time ago for the average user it helps for functionality, but if you know anything about computers it can be quite frustrating.

-Hapa

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I'd rather they used isolated directories for each program, instead of intermingled files.  It's one of the few things from Apple OSes that I prefer. 

 

 

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41 minutes ago, Hapa_Fodder said:

Yes this is true for all apps thought TBH, this is why windows (though not the greatest) has registry cleanup programs, I myself have a separate app that does registry checks along with virus checks on the regular.

Checks are good. Cleanup programs are bad.
Cleanup programs are dumb tools that operate on the premise that if you haven't accessed a program
in a certain amount of time, you must have uninstalled it, so they remove the registry entries.
Then when you go to launch that seldom used utility program, it doesn't work.
 Nowadays the best way is to install Windows, remove all the garbage, and image the drive.
You can also make more images with your main applications installed etc.
If there's ever a problem, click a couple buttons, go make a sandwich, and come back to a fresh computer.

As for viruses, I run windows Defender and don't visit any sketchy sites. Haven't had a virus in years.

43 minutes ago, imaginary_b said:

Citations needed.
Windows uninstallers don't work, or just WarGaming's uninstaller doesn't work?
The registry is a database, not plumbing; how does it get "clogged?" And how does a larger registry actually slow down a computer? 

ALL uninstallers don't work. (Some do but it's rare. Usually confined to small simple programs.)

The main reason why you isolate your operating system on the C: drive and install programs
on a different drive is because anything on the C: drive will slow down your computer.
(It also helps to prevent system malfunctions.)
If you install and uninstall a lot of software, your registry size can get quite large,
and you'll get a performance hit.
It's not as important these days, but back when we were trying to get every frame per second
we could, we learned that you could remove unused .dll files and get a noticeable performance improvement.
The only problem with that turned out to be, several months later you would install a program
and it wouldn't work. After you troubleshot it you learned it was because you removed a .dll file
that it needed. Oops. The time that you spend troubleshooting isn't worth the performance
that you gained, so we quit doing it.

40 minutes ago, Hapa_Fodder said:

this is an issue that Windows forced on software a long time ago for the average user it helps for functionality

More importantly, it was about space.
Hard drive space was extremely expensive back in the day.
Bill Gates was a genius for coming up with the idea of the shared resources, since most
of the programs made calls to the same functions.
Nowadays hard drives are cheap. Windows is obsolete. But hey, billions of dollars,
corporate protectionism, etc. You know the story.

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1 minute ago, z9_ said:

Cleanup programs are dumb tools that operate on the premise that if you haven't accessed a program

Oh I totally agree, however, I use one that lets me cater the settings, which is what I do.

At the end of the day, MOST computer users do not realize that maintenance is important for a PC, not just physically cleaning but cleaning up hard drives and files etc as well.

-Hapa

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8 hours ago, Ducky_shot said:

unknown.png.7d5ca09dc9be5fb90194286cdf9013ba.png

You must install something on your computer to be able to uninstall a program. Sounds legit.

 

8 hours ago, z9_ said:

Probably required to remove the bitcoin generating rootkit that they placed on your computer.

At least, that would be my first guess.

 

1 hour ago, z9_ said:

What would be new is if it actually worked.
Uninstall programs are always leaving behind errant files, and ESSPECIALLY registry entries.
I've seen lots of them that don't even touch the registry.
Hey, most users don't even know what that is, so let's save 1 hour's worth of work and add to
the problem of registry clogging, which 'will' slow down your computer if you get too much stuff in it.

Whenever uninstalling, my preferred way to make sure you get rid of everything scattered hither and yon around your PC is to run RegEdit or a similar registry editing app with admin privileges  and hunt down and delete every registry key  with the app name in it. You'll find a lot of them left behind by uninstall tools.

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