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What happened to the real Myoko in WWII.

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The attached link covers the history of the Myoko and in particular her encounter with a U.S. sub in Dec. 1944.

This web site has many historical videos if you enjoy that.

 

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Surface warships being attacked by submarines isn't unheard of.  In the Pacific Theater, one may be surprised just how much of the IJN were sunk by submarines with these ambushes.

https://maritime.org/doc/subsinpacific.htm#pg6

US submarines sank these IJN ships.

4 Carriers:  Shokaku, Taiho, Unryu, the incomplete Shinano.

4 Escort Carriers

1 BB:  Kongo

4 CAs (3 by USN, 1 by RN)

9 CLs

38 DDs

Really, if one did enough comprehensive reading on the IJN, one starts noticing in numerous ship histories on how so many of them were lost to submarine attacks.  When I used to play Kantai Collection years ago, I knew next to nothing about the naval war in the Pacific.  After reading a lot of the history of the various ships represented in Kantai Collection, which almost all were IJN at the time, it was very surprising to me just to see how much of their warships were sunk by subs. 

 

The IJN wasn't a navy that could afford prolonged attrition.  Their Destroyers in particular suffered heavily.  During the long, bloody fighting for Guadalcanal and the Solomon Islands that followed in 1942-1943, IJN DD losses were very heavy from the many surface engagements.  The US Navy of course keeps track of such losses, and knowing the limitations and heavy workload Japanese shipbuilding were under, passed on directives for submarines to specifically attack Destroyers.

The Hunter became the Hunted.

In the book, "Japanese Destroyer Captain," the author Capt Hara Tameichi mentioned hearing of submarines sinking Destroyers, likened it to a mouse eating a cat.

Destroyers are common ships and used for everything, and the IJN were going to run low.  Just to show how dangerous it was for Destroyers, Capt Hara was the only pre-war IJN DD commanding officer to survive WWII.

 

But the real damage done by US submarines were against shipping, which is covered in pg 7 of that document linked above:

Late in the war the area north and east of Luzon was known to the Japanese as "the Sea of the Devil". In 1944 a common saying in Singapore was that "one could walk from Singapore to Tokyo on American periscopes."

Nothing came close to the % of work done by submarines against shipping.

 

Edit:  A very nasty US submarine attack on the IJN surface forces was early on in the overall Battle of Leyte Gulf in late 1944.  Specifically Palawan Passage.

Admiral Kurita was leading the powerful IJN Center Force, to eventually meet the US Navy at Samar.  But on the way there, they were spotted by two US submarine sentries and were attacked.  Kurita's flagship was CA Atago, which was sunk.  Among those killed were some of his staff, including his Chief of Staff.  Atago's sisters Maya was sunk and Takao was heavily damaged, needed to turn back.

They were heavily armed Takao-class CAs, the IJN had 4 ships of the class, and in one submarine attack 3 of them were taken out of battle:  2 sunk, 1 damaged and sent back.  The last functional one was Chokai, a veteran of earlier victories at Guadalcanal.  But Chokai would meet her fate and be lost at Samar not long after Palawan Passage.

It's been mentioned if this event affected Kurita's mindset for the rest of the battle.  His flagship Atago was sunk, a number of his staff were killed, and he had to get fished out the water.  You wonder if he was "straight in the head" after such a catastrophe.  He still had to lead Center Force to Samar.  It wouldn't get any better for him, his force would then undergo a massive airstrike at Sibuyan Sea the next day, suffering considerable losses, to include Musashi being sunk.

 

You really had to wonder what he was thinking about his prospects for success.  Musashi was sunk, 2 of your CAs were sunk, 1 CA was damaged and sent home, and several more ships were damaged from the recent air attacks, to include Yamato.  They haven't even encountered a single US surface warship to fight.  Kurita survived the war and early on an answer he gave for his ordering of Center Force to retreat at Samar was he was so tired of his men dying needlessly in a lost war.  Consider what Center Force had to endure just go get to Samar, and there they were getting torpedoed and being attacked relentlessly by carrier planes.  At Samar he'd lose 3 more CAs and 3 more damaged CAs.

Edited by HazeGrayUnderway
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5 minutes ago, HazeGrayUnderway said:

Surface warships being attacked by submarines isn't unheard of.  In the Pacific Theater, one may be surprised just how much of the IJN were sunk by submarines with these ambushes.

https://maritime.org/doc/subsinpacific.htm#pg6

US submarines sank these IJN ships.

4 Carriers:  Shokaku, Taiho, Unryu, the incomplete Shinano.

4 Escort Carriers

1 BB:  Kongo

4 CAs (3 by USN, 1 by RN)

9 CLs

38 DDs

Really, if one did enough comprehensive reading on the IJN, one starts noticing in numerous ship histories on how so many of them were lost to submarine attacks.  When I used to play Kantai Collection years ago, I knew next to nothing about the naval war in the Pacific.  After reading a lot of the history of the various ships represented in Kantai Collection, which almost all were IJN at the time, it was very surprising to me just to see how much of their warships were sunk by subs. 

 

The IJN wasn't a navy that could afford prolonged attrition.  Their Destroyers in particular suffered heavily.  During the long, bloody fighting for Guadalcanal and the Solomon Islands that followed in 1942-1943, IJN DD losses were very heavy from the many surface engagements.  The US Navy of course keeps track of such losses, and knowing the limitations and heavy workload Japanese shipbuilding were under, passed on directives for submarines to specifically attack Destroyers.

The Hunter became the Hunted.

In the book, "Japanese Destroyer Captain," the author Capt Hara Tameichi mentioned hearing of submarines sinking Destroyers, likened it to a mouse eating a cat.

Destroyers are common ships and used for everything, and the IJN were going to run low.  Just to show how dangerous it was for Destroyers, Capt Hara was the only pre-war IJN DD commanding officer to survive WWII.

 

But the real damage done by US submarines were against shipping, which is covered in pg 7 of that document linked above:

Late in the war the area north and east of Luzon was known to the Japanese as "the Sea of the Devil". In 1944 a common saying in Singapore was that "one could walk from Singapore to Tokyo on American periscopes."

Nothing came close to the % of work done by submarines against shipping.

 

The fastest way to figure out what happen to all those ships, is the book "The IJN in the Pacific War" by Mark Stiller. 

Most DD's history ends with "sunk by submarine xxx with all hands"

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8 minutes ago, Erebthoron said:

The fastest way to figure out what happen to all those ships, is the book "The IJN in the Pacific War" by Mark Stiller. 

Most DD's history ends with "sunk by submarine xxx with all hands"

It's really nasty stuff.  Mofton had a thread a while back showcasing various Destroyer losses from the war and their causes.

It varies for each navy out there because of the situation they faced in their respective theaters, i.e. Royal Navy DDs suffering huge losses from land based air attacks.  But specifically for the IJN DDs:

G1TRZSX.png

That is huge.  The IJN DD forces endured lots of surface engagements with the Allies for Guadalcanal and the Solomon Islands.  Both sides were basically spearfishing each other in those waters.  Yet in the end, Submarines worked over IJN DD forces even harder than that.  Carrier air power also inflicted heavy losses on IJN DDs but nowhere near what submarines did.

Edited by HazeGrayUnderway

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1 hour ago, S842 said:

The attached link covers the history of the Myoko and in particular her encounter with a U.S. sub in Dec. 1944.

This web site has many historical videos if you enjoy that.

 

A quick search indicates that she was deemed irreparable after a torpedo hit to the stern …

The Myoko and the Takao were kept in Singapore as floating AA batteries instead and scuttled after the war 

 

Basically getting torpedoed and committing seppuku … not as bad as Madame Butterfly but still :)

 

Edited by Commander_367

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