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Klaatu_Nicto

Tips For Emotional Resilience

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One technique is distraction, sometimes abetted by substances.

Who are those people?  What does it all mean? 

 

[This video gets better with the years.]

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My philosophy when dealing with emotional stress is "Suck it up, buttercup." Far too many people today are coddled when they go to pieces over minutiae. What happened to the toughness that Americans were once known for?

 

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8 minutes ago, Snargfargle said:

My philosophy when dealing with emotional stress is "Suck it up, buttercup." Far too many people today are coddled when they go to pieces over minutiae. What happened to the toughness that Americans were once known for?

I think that is vanishing with the agrarian professions.  In cities, the milieu seems more, "The city provides me what I have and lets me do what I do." 

Or maybe that's not quite it.  In a city -- and in the modern electronic reality -- it's next to impossible to be alone and on your own.  The last bullet point may be the most important, though I'd state it differently:

  • reframe, then reflect

But the most important, and probably the most difficult for most, is to reframe.  Get yourself, physically or at least mentally, somewhere else.  Then look back at where you've been.  Without that separation, it's all too easy to get swept along, wittingly or not, accepting the emotions of others.

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6 minutes ago, iDuckman said:

I think that is vanishing with the agrarian professions. 

Farming engenders self-sufficiency more than anything else that I can think of, and I've done a lot of different things. Farmers appear to be rich because they work vast acreages of land and operate expensive equipment but they actually are constantly paying off debt and oftentimes don't have a lot of cash on hand. Therefore, most of them learn to be as frugal and self-sufficient as as possible. A lot of my self-sufficiency stems from the fact that I worked on farms and helped my dad build houses as a kid. I extended my abilities by being a soldier and medic. Now, I rarely have to rely on anyone for anything unless I want to. I did have a neighbor (literally a next door neighbor as his shop is across the street from mine) who has a roofing business come and reshingle my roof after the last hail storm because his crew could get it done a lot faster than I could and the insurance was paying for it. However, I'd done it myself twice before, not to mention that Dad and I built the house. 

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I like what the author of the article wrote at the very end.

Studies show that people who go through very difficult life experiences can emerge from it with a stronger sense of psychological resilience, rekindled relationships and a renewed appreciation of life. Some describe starting to live more fully and purposefully.

I've found that to be true in my life life after very difficult experiences.

Funny story: Earlier today on the phone I was talking to Dennis, someone I've been friends with since 1962. He lives off the grid in northeast Washington state along the Canadian border. I asked him with the snow on the ground is he able to go out and hunt when he needs food.  He said there are six deer in my front yard right now so all I have to do is open a window and take the shot. Turns out they like to hang out around his house and in his barn during the winter.

That's Dennis on the left with the big beard. I'm standing behind him with the red t-shirt. Standing to my left in the dark blue T is Teri. All of us in this picture have been friends with each other since the 1960s. That was a get together we had in 2017.

Spoiler

image.thumb.png.12c7dd721bb4b2f3c205f4949edbae3e.png

The bad thing with these modern cameras is they always make it look like I've lost most of my hair. :Smile-angry:

Bellow is me on the left, Dennis in the middle and Teri. As you can see, those early 1970s cameras didn't make my hair disappear.

image.thumb.png.f35504b494269fed2c2edd47d554e7a0.png

 

 

Edited by Klaatu_Nicto
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Take teaspoon of concrete with your coffee and harden up, Australian version. 

 

People  these days are more focused on their rights rather than their responsibilities, the cry of why doesn't the government do something to make my life easier, happier etc echoes throughout the western world.

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You can expect someone to rescue you or you can rescue yourself.

I have been more the hero than one needing rescuing all my life.

Even when I have been the hero, I am often not seen or appreciated as such at one point or another.

And I seldom ask for help, but rather my family steps up and is there for me when I am injured, ill, or in a bad predicament.

In those rare cases, I always pull through. Always stronger, wiser, and more aware of things that can be dangerous.

I now make plans within plans. I play the long game. Those that wronged me I don't bother. Someone already knows and those individuals are dealt with according to law.

I stay healthy. I do what I can for local causes and help causes when I am able to outside of my sphere.

In light of recent events, I am glad I prepare like I do. I taught others this way. And hopefully they are okay.

Common sense is the one thing that separates the living and the dead.

Sadly the supply shortages are knee jerk reactions by people that didn't prepare and some will likely get sick anyway.

For those thinking it looks bleak, think about what you are doing and evaluate what you can do to help yourself first in the future.

You can try to do it alone. Many have. It's fine if you have a plan. But it makes things easier if you have others to help and you are there for them as well.

My biggest problem is I don't know how to stop saving the world. I just don't. I am stubborn that way. It has cost me.

And I am only starting to get the bill.

In the end, all things end. How you want it to end is always in your hands. Nobody drives it,  save for a higher power.

When your time is up, don't argue, fight to the end.

We are all just a heartbeat away from the inevitable but don't just let it happen, do something that fights it.

This virus thing will pass. But the world will be a whole lot different after.

What was maybe taken for granted, may be reconsidered rather than disregarded.

Many eyes will be open for the first time in their lives.

It is their revelation. Let's hope they recognize this and act on it.

For it is the doom of those that soon forget.

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3 hours ago, Klaatu_Nicto said:

I like what the author of the article wrote at the very end.

Studies show that people who go through very difficult life experiences can emerge from it with a stronger sense of psychological resilience, rekindled relationships and a renewed appreciation of life. Some describe starting to live more fully and purposefully.

I've found that to be true in my life life after very difficult experiences.

Funny story: Earlier today on the phone I was talking to Dennis, someone I've been friends with since 1962. He lives off the grid in northeast Washington state along the Canadian border. I asked him with the snow on the ground is he able to go out and hunt when he needs food.  He said there are six deer in my front yard right now so all I have to do is open a window and take the shot. Turns out they like to hang out around his house and in his barn during the winter.

That's Dennis on the left with the big beard. I'm standing behind him with the red t-shirt. Standing to my left in the dark blue T is Teri. All of us in this picture have been friends with each other since the 1960s. That was a get together we had in 2017.

  Reveal hidden contents

image.thumb.png.12c7dd721bb4b2f3c205f4949edbae3e.png

The bad thing with these modern cameras is they always make it look like I've lost most of my hair. :Smile-angry:

Bellow is me on the left, Dennis in the middle and Teri. As you can see, those early 1970s cameras didn't make my hair disappear.

image.thumb.png.f35504b494269fed2c2edd47d554e7a0.png

 

 

That crew looks tougher than a dollar steak.

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6 hours ago, Klaatu_Nicto said:

I like what the author of the article wrote at the very end.

Studies show that people who go through very difficult life experiences can emerge from it with a stronger sense of psychological resilience, rekindled relationships and a renewed appreciation of life. Some describe starting to live more fully and purposefully.

I've found that to be true in my life life after very difficult experiences.

That's Dennis on the left with the big beard. I'm standing behind him with the red t-shirt. Standing to my left in the dark blue T is Teri. All of us in this picture have been friends with each other since the 1960s. That was a get together we had in 2017.

  Hide contents

image.thumb.png.12c7dd721bb4b2f3c205f4949edbae3e.png

 

I gave you an upvote for looking like you just might be older than me. :Smile_veryhappy:

I agree with that statement too. My grandma raised her kids during the Depression and WWII rationing, while working full-time in the factory building bombers too. She was pretty self-reliant. Grandma pretty much grew every vegetable she ever ate in her whole life.

Speaking of gardens, it's raining now but that means that I'll be able to get out and do the spring till on the garden later this week and get some onions planted. I am going to assume that there's not been a run on onion sets at the hardware store as of yet. For most crops I just reuse seeds from the previous year but onions are sort of a hassle to do this with as they are biennials so I just buy sets. You can buy 50 onion sets for $2.50 at the hardware store. A nickel an onion ain't too bad.

Edited by Snargfargle
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7 hours ago, Klaatu_Nicto said:

 

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Bellow is me on the left, Dennis in the middle and Teri. As you can see, those early 1970s cameras didn't make my hair disappear.

image.thumb.png.f35504b494269fed2c2edd47

 

 

 

I agree with you. My avatar to the left was taken with a 1970s Cannon TX. Just look at how young and trim it makes me look. I have no idea what's happened with digital cameras nowadays because I don't look anything like that in recent photos. 

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9 hours ago, DrHolmes52 said:

That crew looks tougher than a dollar steak.

Back in the day we were known as the F Street Gang. We were not a criminal gang. We were a party hardy gang.

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6 hours ago, Snargfargle said:

I gave you an upvote for looking like you just might be older than me. :Smile_veryhappy:

I agree with that statement too. My grandma raised her kids during the Depression and WWII rationing, while working full-time in the factory building bombers too. She was pretty self-reliant. Grandma pretty much grew every vegetable she ever ate in her whole life.

Speaking of gardens, it's raining now but that means that I'll be able to get out and do the spring till on the garden later this week and get some onions planted. I am going to assume that there's not been a run on onion sets at the hardware store as of yet. For most crops I just reuse seeds from the previous year but onions are sort of a hassle to do this with as they are biennials so I just buy sets. You can buy 50 onion sets for $2.50 at the hardware store. A nickel an onion ain't too bad.

 

I can hardly mow my yard anymore. I make one pass across the yard and I have to stop for a minute to catch my breath. I can't do it all in one day either. I mow about a third of the yard then I have to stop and recover for a couple of days before I start again. I am not aging well.  When that picture was taken in 2017 I was in a lot of pain. A few days before that I hurt my back simply doing some house cleaning.

 

The F Street Gang had another get together last year at Al's place. In 2017 Al  and Brad put on a little concert but last year Al had a full band with background singers. He had the sound going onto a hard drive and someone filming with fixed and mobile cameras. One of these days he'll finishing putting it all together and if we put it on youtube I'll share it.  It was lot better than what one might think. In fact, a lot better than some current popular bands.

From 2017. That's Al in the bark blue. Half of Brad in the light blue.

Spoiler

image.thumb.png.e57cc5dd107db858a994ea730e62b045.png

 

Edited by Klaatu_Nicto

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35 minutes ago, Klaatu_Nicto said:

Brad put on a little concert 

  Hide contents

image.thumb.png.e57cc5dd107db858a994ea730e62b045.png

 

A cousin of Dad's is a professional bluegrass musician and I hear tell my great-grandpa was pretty good with a fiddle too but I didn't inherit any of that talent. I've owned a guitar since high school and know about five chords, which is five more than I knew 50 years ago, I guess. Before I die I'm hoping to get that up to at least seven!

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