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tm63au

Captains I would like On My Ships

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Last year WG designed and created Five Historical Vanilla Flag Officers for sale in The Armoury all worthy to be part of this game, over the past years on the forums myself and many others have thrown up well known names to be included in the game and some day they will get to sail our ships into battle.

Now obviously WG cant create every Naval officer for every ship in game for a variety of reasons but I'm certain we will get a steady number of them as time goes by.

As mentioned earlier I have written many a post about a number of the more well known Captains I feel would be of great bonus to the game I also have a list of shall we say officers that played a prominent part for the country but were in the lime light to a lesser extent than say someone such as Hans Wilhelm Langsdorff but still would be a worthy addition to this game as a Vanilla Captain to be aboard my ships.

I would like to point out these Officers Captained a different variety of naval vessels so in the interest of all they would be Vanilla so to be suitable to Captain any type of ship including as you will read why I propose this.

My List:

 

Royal Australian Navy captain

Informal head-and-shoulders portrait of man in dark coat and sweater, smoking a pipe

Hector Macdonald Laws (Hec) Waller, DSO & Bar (4 April 1900 – 1 March 1942) was a senior officer in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). His career spanned almost thirty years, including service in both world wars. At the helm of the flotilla leader HMAS Stuart in the Mediterranean from 1939 to 1941, he won recognition as a skilful ship's captain and flotilla commander. He then transferred to the South West Pacific as captain of the light cruiser HMAS Perth, and went down with his ship against heavy odds during the Battle of Sunda Strait in early 1942.

Born in Benalla, Victoria, Waller entered the Royal Australian Naval College at the age of thirteen. After graduating, he served with the Royal Navy in the closing stages of World War I. Between the wars, he specialised in communications and was posted as signals officer to several British and Australian warships. He gained his first seagoing command in 1937, as captain of the destroyer HMS Brazen. In September 1939, he took charge of HMAS Stuart and four other obsolete destroyers that together became known as the "Scrap Iron Flotilla". In 1940, these were augmented by other ships to form the 10th Destroyer Flotilla, supporting Allied troops in North Africa.

Waller was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and Bar, and twice mentioned in despatches, for his achievements in the Mediterranean. He assumed command of HMAS Perth in October 1941, taking part in the Battle of the Java Sea shortly before his final action in Sunda Strait. He received a third mention in despatches posthumously, and in 2011 came under formal consideration for the award of the Victoria Cross for his performance as Perth's captain. The submarine HMAS Waller is named in his honour.

Well that's a given I would be putting him in HMAS Perth with no questions asked.

Shunsaku Kudo.jpg

Commander Shunsaku Kudō (工藤 俊作, Kudō Shunsaku, January 7, 1901 – January 12, 1979) was an officer in the Imperial Japanese Navy. He is notable for the humanitarian act of rescuing 442 enemy British and American sailors from the Java Sea in 1942.

Born in 1901, Kudō graduated from the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy in 1923 and was assigned to the light cruiser Yubari as a midshipman, followed by the battleship Nagato in October 1924. He was commissioned in December 1924, was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant in 1926, and took his first command, the destroyer Hatakaze, in 1929. He assumed command of Ikazuchi in November 1940.

Born in 1901, Kudō graduated from the Imperial Japanese Naval Academy in 1923 and was assigned to the light cruiser Yubari as a midshipman, followed by the battleship Nagato in October 1924. He was commissioned in December 1924, was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant in 1926, and took his first command, the destroyer Hatakaze, in 1929. He assumed command of Ikazuchi in November 1940.

On March 2, 1942, Lieutenant Commander Kudō ordered Ikazuchi to rescue 442 survivors from the Royal Navy destroyer HMS Encounter and United States Navy destroyer USS Pope. These ships had been sunk the previous day, along with HMS Exeter, in the Java Sea between Java and Borneo, off the Indonesian port of Soerabaja. The survivors had been adrift for some 20 hours, in rafts and lifejackets or clinging to floats, many coated in oil and unable to see. Among the rescued was Sir Sam Falle, later a British diplomat This humanitarian decision by Lieutenant Commander Kudō placed the Ikazuchi at risk of submarine attack, and interfered with her fighting ability due to the sheer numbers of rescued sailors. Humility and sadness sealed Kudō Shunsaku's lips after Ikazuchi was sunk with all its crew, thus he never told anyone about this heroic rescue.

After the war, Kudō left the navy and moved to Kawaguchi, Saitama. In 1979, he died of stomach cancer.

I have been hoping WG would design a Shunsaku kudo / IJN Ikazuchi  premium package but if that does not come to be, if  the Captain finds his way in game alone he will be in my best IJN Destroyer.

Another question that begs to be asked why has there never been a Western made movie or mini series about this man.

  

Piet de Jong 1970.jpg

Petrus Jozef Sietse "Piet" de Jong (Dutch pronunciation: [ˈpeːtrɵs ˈjoːzəf ˈsitsə ˈpit də ˈjɔŋ]; 3 April 1915 – 27 July 2016) was a Dutch politician of the defunct Catholic People's Party (KVP) now merged into the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) party and naval officer who served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from 5 April 1967 to 6 July 1971.

De Jong applied at the Royal Naval College in Den Helder in June 1931 as an Midshipman before graduating as an Ensign in the Royal Netherlands Navy in July 1934 and joined the Royal Netherlands Navy Submarine Service. On 10 May 1940 Nazi Germany invaded the Netherlands and the government fled to London to escape the German occupation. De Jong then an Lieutenant junior grade was giving a battlefield promotion and command of the nearly finished submarine HNLMS O 24 and was ordered to bring the submarine to the HMNB Portsmouth naval base in Portsmouth, England. De Jong successfully navigated the HNLMS O 24 through English Channel and was awarded the Bronze Cross for bravery on 16 July 1940. De Jong served as First Officer on the HNLMS O 24 from July 1940 until October 1944 fighting in the Battle of the Atlantic from July 1940 until July 1942 when the HNLMS O 24 was transferred to the British Eastern Fleet to fight in the Pacific War. On 8 July 1943 De Jong was awarded the Bronze Cross for bravery a second time. On 25 October 1944 De Jong was promoted to Lieutenant commander and was appointment as Commanding Officer of the HNLMS O 24. Under his command the HNLMS O 24 initially continued in the Pacific War. Following the end of World War II De Jong continued to serve in the Royal Netherlands Navy holding several administrative functions. On 14 November 1951 De Jong was appointment as Commanding Officer of the frigate HNLMS De Zeeuw and on 20 October 1951 De Jong was transferred to the Allied Command Channel at the HMNB Portsmouth naval base in Portsmouth, England as a senior staff officer. In April 1953 De Jong was promoted to Commander and in March 1955 De Jong was appointment as chief of staff to the Inspector General of the Navy Lieutenant admiral Prince Bernhard and as chief military adjutant and senior aide-de-camp to Queen Juliana. In October 1958 De Jong was promoted to Captain and appointment as Commanding Officer of the destroyer HNLMS Gelderland.

 

A black and white photo of a man wearing a military uniform with an Iron Cross.

 

Werner Hartenstein (27 February 1908 – 8 March 1943) was a German naval officer during World War II who commanded the U-boat U-156. He was a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross of  Germany. Hartenstein was credited with sinking 20 ships totaling 97,504 gross register tons (GRT), and with damaging three ships and a destroyer.

Born in Plauen, Hartenstein joined the navy in 1928. After serving on torpedo boats during the Spanish Civil War and the first year of World War II, he transferred to the U-boat service in 1941. In September 1942, Hartenstein torpedoed and sank the RMS Laconia, then attempted to rescue the survivors. He was forced to abort the rescue operations when his U-boat came under attack by a U.S. Air Force bomber. The event became known as the "Laconia incident" and resulted in the "Laconia Order", an order from the Command of the U-boat Arm to the entire German U-boat force that forbade rescuing the survivors of sunken ships. Hartenstein and the entire crew of U-156 were killed in action by depth charges from U.S. aircraft on 8 March 1943.

Laconia Incident and fourth patrol:

On 12 September 1942 U-156 was patrolling off the coast of West Africa midway between Liberia and Ascension Island roughly 600 nautical miles (1,100 km; 690 mi) south of Cape Palmas. At 11:37 the aft port lookout sighted a smoke stack at 230 degrees. Hartenstein followed the target, which was zigzagging at 14 knots (26 km/h; 16 mph), until the general direction of the large ocean liner became evident. U-156 was running at 17 knots (31 km/h; 20 mph) into a favourable attack position, and Hartenstein ordered the attack at 21:07. He slowed speed at 22:00 and ordered surfaced deflection shots from torpedo tubes I and III. After three minutes and six seconds the first torpedo detonated, then the second. He had hoped to capture the ship's senior officers, but to his surprise, Hartenstein saw over two thousand people struggling in the water. Hartenstein immediately began rescue operations. Laconia sank at 23:23.

At 01:25 on 13 September 1942 Hartenstein radioed the Befehlshaber der U-Boote (BdU—commander of U-boats) requesting guidance and confirmation on how to proceed. The BdU responded at 03:45 ordering Wolf pack Eisbär, consisting of U-507 under the command of Harro Schacht, U-506 under the command of Erich Würdemann and U-459 under the command of Georg von Wilamowitz-Moellendorf, to assist Hartenstein immediately. At 06:00 Hartenstein ordered that the following message be sent on the 25m wavelength:

"If any ship will assist the ship-wrecked Laconia crew, I will not attack providing I am not being attacked by ship or air forces. I picked up 193 men. 4°53 South/11°26 West – German submarine"

The message was repeated twice on the international 600m wavelength. The BdU later changed the order slightly and U-506, U-507 and the Italian submarine Capellini were dispatched. In parallel U-156 was assisting and supplying the survivors in the numerous lifeboats that kept arriving or were picked up. U-506 arrived at 11:32 on 14 September 1942, followed by U-507 in the afternoon of 15 September. Heading to a rendezvous with Vichy French ships under Red Cross banners.

On 19 September 1942, U-156 was roughly 800 nautical miles (1,500 km; 920 mi) south of Freetown and the crew was still repairing minor damage, when the lookout spotted a ship at 04:30. The target was the British ship Quebec City, en route from Cape Town to Freetown. Hartenstein attacked from a submerged position and hit Quebec City with one torpedo fired from tube VI. Hartenstein surfaced and approached the lifeboats and asked the survivors for the ship's name. Quebec City did not sink easily and U-156 fired 58 rounds from the 37 mm (1.46 in) flak gun and seven further shots from the 10.5 cm gun before Hartenstein ordered a cease fire. After a direct hit in the ship's stern ammunition magazine and an explosion, Quebec City slowly sank. According to William Clark, a member of Quebec City's crew, Hartenstein made sure that the survivors had enough water and provisions and that Captain William Thomas had the exact coordinates. This account of that attack and the impression that the humanitarian actions of Hartenstein made is documented in the book by David Cledlyn Jones, The Enemy We Killed, My Friend. Hartenstein did express that it would have been his wish to tow them at least some distance to the African coast, but explained that he was not able to do so as he recently had been attacked while attempting to aid survivors.

 

Great Captains are not only defined by skill and leadership but also bravery and humanity.

These are but a few and there are many more like them hopefully they will see there way into the game.

 

 

 
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 

 

   

 

Edited by tm63au
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Don't forget Harry DeWolf, the first captain of the HMCS Haida.

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2 hours ago, tm63au said:

Another question that begs to be asked why has there never been a Western made movie or mini series about this man.

You expect Westerners to make a movie that glorified Imperial Japan?

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All of these captains should be included in the game.

Each one of them represented themselves well in the decisions they made, humanitarian actions, and acts of bravery during key historical events.

What defines a great captain in that time period is not always defined by his actions for his service to his country, but by making the hard choices that other captains may pass up because they are hard.

Each one best exemplifies what it takes to command a ship and the burden of that command.

And like you said OP, there are yet more stories out there that few would know of such acts of exemplary service and duty.

It is also unfortunate that some heroes are often overshadowed by their nation's participation in the war.

Not many see the perspectives of these fine captains nor would they be instantly made popular by the media of the times then or now.

Most of these captains would have been overlooked had not Allied Navy command documented most accounts. Yet, I often wonder how many such documented accounts faded in to obscurity.

It seems obvious for Waller.

Kudo's honor and cultural heritage kept him humble about it. Yet he did what even the Imperial Japanese Army would forbade him to do. Which for me is more dangerous. Yet he even trusted his own men to keep quiet about it. That is a great captain because his men backed him up by staying loyal.

And yes, I agree Ikazuchi should be offered to honor the crew. It just shows that showing mercy for your enemy is not a weakness, but a badge of Honor.

Jung is the rare case of a captain without a home and he kept fighting for not just to get his home back, but to help the Allies by lending his expertise. He was at the time one of few captains familiar with the waters around his country and proved to be a valuable asset. His career shaped the foundation of submarine captains for the Netherlands in the decades to come.

I can see how Hartenstein would be overlooked. His actions evoke the true nature and spirit of the Kriegsmarine. The Kriegsmarine didn't care for fascism. They served their nation with great distinction but did so honorably. There were few exceptions.

In Hartenstein's case, he made quite an impression on both sides. He called it in because he couldn't save the crew of Laconia otherwise without help. He even helped Allied Naval forces to locate the life rafts. That is going a lot out of the way considering his crew was in the most despised ship type in the war.

Yet he made a conscious decision, that involved others involvement. It was a very dangerous one at that. Because while he could rely on his fellow Kriegsmarine to help, he knew the dangerous part was whether the Allies would not attack him while performing the rescue.

It was a defining moment in the war because the incident took great coordination and risk. But proved to be the final straw for Berlin.

The subsequent order to not render aid was a blow to not just the Kriegsmarine but to humanity. It didn't sit well with many officers and men of the Kriegsmarine. 

WW2 has many stories to tell. And I agree, there are many captains out there that did what was right even if it was not popular with the command higher up.

For every act of heroism for combat duty, there was recognition almost immediately. But the humanitarian actions of a rare few can quite often be overlooked and if not documented, forgotten by time.

It is those rare moments in history that we see the rarest examples of this.

We often make our heroes from popular media of the times, but seldom see the hero that did things in the background because those heroes never cared for the spotlight. Those heroes often think they did what was supposed to be common, but yet it was not common.

It is that rare humility that only historians write in books later after researching the actions of those days.

I hope WG does recognize these captains, and maybe the countless numbers of others often overlooked.

 

 

 

 

 

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10 minutes ago, RyuuohD_NA said:

You expect Westerners to make a movie that glorified Imperial Japan?

That was not an example of Imperial Japanese Navy glory.

That is an example of a great captain.

There is no national distinction when it comes to committing humanitarian acts.

In his own country, he would be celebrated as being a great Japanese captain and citizen.

In other countries, a great human being. The IJ government under Togo would not have allowed him to do this.

I wonder if Kudo's other contribution became an American slang term for praise? Kudos.

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I greatly approve of all of this.

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45 minutes ago, RyuuohD_NA said:

You expect Westerners to make a movie that glorified Imperial Japan?

We are talking about a humanitarian act and a noble act by a Naval officer from of that time a enemy combatant Nation.

You might also want to go to YouTube or hire a out a DVD that made some years ago by British Television depicting the events of The Laconia Incident which involved a German U - boat rescuing survivors from a Allied liner.

If you like I could post the both You Tube videos here.

So if a western nation can make a two part miniseries about a German submarine rescuing people from the very ship it sank why cant it be the same for this Officer just asking.    

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5 minutes ago, tm63au said:

We are talking about a humanitarian act and a noble act by a Naval officer from of that time a enemy combatant Nation.

You might also want to go to YouTube or hire a out a DVD that made some years ago by British Television depicting the events of The Laconia Incident which involved a German U - boat rescuing survivors from a Allied liner.

If you like I could post the both You Tube videos here.

So if a western nation can make a two part miniseries about a German submarine rescuing people from the very ship it sank why cant it be the same for this Officer just asking.    

Because they're Japanese and America have such deep hatred for them that even one general has a quote that can be translated that he wants all Japanese people dead (i.e. "the only place the Japanese language will be spoken is in hell")? That the crew that dropped the nukes on Japan said that they'll be fine to do it again?

Edited by RyuuohD_NA
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11 minutes ago, RyuuohD_NA said:

Because they're Japanese and America have such deep hatred for them.....

You understand the concept that there is more to western media than just Hollywood, right?

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2 hours ago, RyuuohD_NA said:

Because they're Japanese and America have such deep hatred.

????

No we don't. One persons individual comments don't represent the opinion of over 300+ million people.

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Recognizing the rescue of survivors is a welcome learning experience for me.  Thanks for sharing these career stories, original poster tm63au.

tm63au, I like your idea for more Commanders to the game, especially ones who risked their crews & vessels in order to rescue survivors in the water.

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5 hours ago, Lert said:

You understand the concept that there is more to western media than just Hollywood, right?

Even then, Hollywood can do it right sometimes.

2002226886_download(1).jpg.cf8997509ee19aa74c3a5f0430ae25e2.jpg

Add me to the list of the confused as to the "deep hatred".  

And for another commander that would be worthwhile adding, I'd suggest German Captain Karl von Müller. It would be fitting, seeing as we already have his ship in game.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_von_M%C3%BCller

https://www.thehindu.com/society/history-and-culture/how-german-cruiser-emden-struck-terror-in-the-heart-of-the-british-empire-and-became-a-tamil-word/article30881258.ece/photo/1/

 

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