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Midshipman_Hornblower

Old Luddite Forum Question

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Ok, I haven't been able to figure this out.  I could probably ask my grandchildren, but they don't happen to be available atm, so...

In forum posts, I've seen people mention a specific player in the text, when they want to be sure that player sees the message.  Maybe there's a question, and you want Fem to confirm the answer, so you somehow embed Fed into the text, so she sees a notification and it calls her attention to the post.

How the heck do you do that?

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Type the ampersand "at sign" (i.e. the '@') then the player's name.  A pop-up will , well, pop up that includes a number of user names that will shrink as you complete the player's name.  If you see the user's name, just click on it and you'll see "@user_name" with a blue background show up in your post, indicating that user_name will get a notification.

 

Edited by Crucis
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2 minutes ago, Midshipman_Hornblower said:

Ok, I haven't been able to figure this out.  I could probably ask my grandchildren, but they don't happen to be available atm, so...

In forum posts, I've seen people mention a specific player in the text, when they want to be sure that player sees the message.  Maybe there's a question, and you want Fem to confirm the answer, so you somehow embed Fed into the text, so she sees a notification and it calls her attention to the post.

How the heck do you do that?

Type @ and then start typing their name, it will populate a list to choose from that will narrow down the more characters they type

 

Screenshot_20200118-080052.png

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1 hour ago, Crucis said:

Type the ampersand (i.e. the '@') then the player's name.  A pop-up will , well, pop up that includes a number of user names that will shrink as you complete the player's name.  If you see the user's name, just click on it and you'll see "@user_name" with a blue background show up in your post, indicating that user_name will get a notification.

 

This in an ampersand &

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5 minutes ago, Pulicat said:

This in an ampersand &

You're right.  My bad.

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Long ago editing experience:

& - ampersand

@- amphora

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1 hour ago, Midshipman_Hornblower said:

Thanks, guys.  I knew it had to be easy, and... @Midshipman_Hornblower.  Hey, it works!  Look what I can do.  Oh, there'll be no shuttin' me up now.

For the next few weeks everybody will be tagging @Midshipman_Hornblower in anything ;)

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2 hours ago, Pugilistic said:

@- amphora

Never heard it referred to as that, amphora is an ancient Greco-Roman wine jug. There has been lots of attempts at giving the "at sign" a single word name but none of them have caught on over the years.

 

"The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as "at"; it is also commonly called the at symbol or commercial at. It is used as an accounting and invoice abbreviation meaning "at a rate of" (e.g. 7 widgets @ £2 per widget = £14),[1] but it is now seen more widely in email addresses and social media platform handles.

The absence of a single English word for the symbol has prompted some writers to use the French arobase[2] or Spanish and Portuguese arroba, or to coin new words such as ampersat,[3] asperand,[4] and strudel,[5] but none of these has achieved wide use. The term alphasand is sometimes used, especially in East Asia.[citation needed]

Although not included on the keyboard of the earliest commercially successful typewriters, it was on at least one 1889 model[6] and the very successful Underwood models from the "Underwood No. 5" in 1900 onward. It started to be used in email addresses in the 1970s, and is now universally included on computer keyboards."

From

Wikipedia @ sign article.

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2 hours ago, Efros said:

Never heard it referred to as that, amphora is an ancient Greco-Roman wine jug. There has been lots of attempts at giving the "at sign" a single word name but none of them have caught on over the years.

 

"The at sign, @, is normally read aloud as "at"; it is also commonly called the at symbol or commercial at. It is used as an accounting and invoice abbreviation meaning "at a rate of" (e.g. 7 widgets @ £2 per widget = £14),[1] but it is now seen more widely in email addresses and social media platform handles.

The absence of a single English word for the symbol has prompted some writers to use the French arobase[2] or Spanish and Portuguese arroba, or to coin new words such as ampersat,[3] asperand,[4] and strudel,[5] but none of these has achieved wide use. The term alphasand is sometimes used, especially in East Asia.[citation needed]

Although not included on the keyboard of the earliest commercially successful typewriters, it was on at least one 1889 model[6] and the very successful Underwood models from the "Underwood No. 5" in 1900 onward. It started to be used in email addresses in the 1970s, and is now universally included on computer keyboards."

From

Wikipedia @ sign article.

Yet another demonstration of the need to consult sources in addition to Wikipedia. 

Im not throwing rocks, I have done some Wikipedia content and editing. 

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erm I did,

there's an interesting thread on the Guardian website here

The amphora seems to come from a chap called Stabile who found @ being used as a symbol for a measure of wine, an amphora. How that then becomes 'at' isn't made clear. Excerpt from a letter from 1536 which Stabile says contains @.

"There, an amphora of wine, which is one thirtieth of a barrel, is worth 70 or 80 ducats," Mr Lapi informs his correspondent, representing the amphora with the now familiar symbol of an "a" wrapped in its own tail."

I would suggest that the use of the word amphora in this context is obscure and hardly backed by substantial evidence. It certainly hasn't caught on.

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