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HOTA_CHATON

Have we all forgotten? Have we?

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This morning, at around 6 AM or so, on December 7th, 1941 the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.  We have forgotten this historical date, just like we have forgotten 911.  It is so sad as these brave people laid down their lives so that we could all be who, what, and where we are, how and when we want to be.  Without these great patriots, who affected, not just America, but the entire world, we would not have the freedoms, lives, existences, etc that we all now have.  I personally am ashamed that I did not think of this earlier and post a hearty thank you to any and all surviving veterans of that WWII battle, as it truly cemented our commitment to our involvement in it.  We must never forget what happened as it changed the entire world forever, whether you view it as good, bad, or meaningless. 

I salute all or our WWII Veterans whether living or deceased, may they all find the peace they so richly deserve.

 

HOTA

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No one's forgotten anything. But those people served, fought, and died so we can live our lives, not so we can spend all our time stuck in the past. What more do you suggest we as a society do to remember something that happened eighty years ago? 

Edited by poeticmotion

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18 minutes ago, poeticmotion said:

No one's forgotten anything. But those people served, fought, and died so we can live our lives, not so we can spend all our time stuck in the past. What more do you suggest we as a society do to remember something that happened eighty years ago? 

Not forget maybe?

Sound easy enough.

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28 minutes ago, Versili said:

Not forget maybe?

Sound easy enough.

Nobody has.

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1 hour ago, HOTA_CHATON said:

We have forgotten this historical date, just like we have forgotten 911.

Speak for yourself, I have not forgotten.

1 hour ago, HOTA_CHATON said:

It is so sad as these brave people laid down their lives so that we could all be who, what, and where we are, how and when we want to be.  Without these great patriots, who affected, not just America, but the entire world, we would not have the freedoms, lives, existences, etc that we all now have.

It is sad and I am sure some of them were brave, this was a sneak attack that was or was not known by the government, but for sure it should have been expected and watched for, if it wasn't for the Hubris of the American people, it might not have happened.

1 hour ago, HOTA_CHATON said:

We must never forget what happened as it changed the entire world forever, whether you view it as good, bad, or meaningless.

War never changes anything, they don't end wars, they don't provide peace,  maybe it's better that we just don't do them anymore and forget them all together.

 

1 hour ago, HOTA_CHATON said:

I salute all or our WWII Veterans whether living or deceased, may they all find the peace they so richly deserve.

:Smile_honoring: Saluting them is easy, learning from the past, is the hard part of honoring them.

 

War is defined as an active conflict that has claimed more than 1,000 lives. Of the past 3,400 years, humans have been entirely at peace for 268 of them, or just 8 percent of recorded history.

Here is a list of wars and conflicts since WW2 to the present,   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars:_1945–1989  We have learned nothing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars:_1990–2002

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_wars:_2003–present

Edited by Sovereigndawg
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As an event gets farther and farther into the past it becomes likely that only those interested in history will know much about that event, sadly that is how history works.

 

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Not all have forgotten.  
Lead by good example.

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1 hour ago, Sovereigndawg said:

War never changes anything, they don't end wars, they don't provide peace,  maybe it's better that we just don't do them anymore and forget them all together.

07 to that Dawg.

& 07 not only to those that lost their lives at Pearl Harbor but to all who have served throughout the planet in all the wars in the past.

But I do believe it's time we evolved out of need to "exterminate all those who oppose us"...especially those based on nothing more than one mythology against another mythology.

1 hour ago, Sovereigndawg said:

 

Nevermind...my next thought on the subject might be a little too political (or anti-political depending on your viewpoint) for the forums.

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No, it has not been forgotten, but with the passage of time the emotional impact lessens as those who lived through the event die off. Did you notice how there was considerable to do over Veterans day last month, but little mention of what the date originally was: Armistice Day, the end of the First World War. The last World War I veteran has died and the conflict is a purely historical event now, as nobody is left who was there. World War II is rapidly joining it as those veterans are dying at the rate of around 5000 a day. I worked for several years for the Burdick Military History Project, which conducted interviews and recorded oral histories from World War II veterans so we could get their first hand accounts while they were still around to give them. The project is all but defunct now, as the supply of veterans has dwindled considerably. Since the veterans themselves predominantly looked upon the war as an unpleasant task that they had to finish before they could go back home and resume their lives, honestly, the best way to remember Pearl Harbor is to go about your life and be happy that you are free to do so. They were not looking for fame, or immortality in the history books, they were teenagers and twenty-somethings and they just wanted to do their job and go home.

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2 hours ago, Doombeagle said:

 They were not looking for fame, or immortality in the history books, they were teenagers and twenty-somethings and they just wanted to do their job and go home.

When I was a kid, almost every man in my home town had at one time served in the military, even in peacetime because of the draft. You would have never known it though because they never talked much about it, other than telling an occasional funny story.

For instance, my boss in the Army told a story of how he'd seen a king cobra in a trench in Vietnam and when he went to get a shotgun to shoot it fell into the trench, lost the shotgun, and thought the snake was biting him because every time he'd try to climb out of the trench he'd fall back down and a root would poke him in the ankle. He never did say how he got a Silver Star, a Purple Heart, and two Bronze Stars (Valor).

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I think 9/11, for me at least, really was a personal experience in what it must have been like for many Americans when Pearl Harbor happened.  Typical morning.  Got ready for work and looked briefly at AOL's page (yea, AOL was popular back then).  I thought, some idiot in a Cessna must have hit the World Trade Center...  and left for work.

Didn't listen to the news on the way there.  First indication something serious was going on was when I got to work and there were armed guards at the entrance and the whole place was locked down.  Sat in my boss's office with everyone else from my department and all I could think was We're at war with somebody...  

I figured I be called up (in the reserves then).  Next day I did get called by my unit CO who told me all the E-6 and below were being activated.  One guy I had to get ahold of was in Maryland for his sister's wedding (he was in a unit in Arizona).  I told him he had 72 hours to report and if he couldn't get back to Arizona to report to the nearest military command he could find.

I went to San Diego to help do quick electrical repairs on a OH Perry frigate so it could be moved from below the Coronado Bridge.  The Navy feared it might be attacked by someone dropping something from the bridge.  What a cluster.... that was getting into and out of the base there.

But, the whole of that brought home what it must have been like for Americans when Pearl Harbor happened.  The uncertainty, maybe the fear (I didn't feel afraid so much as uncertainty), and the shock.  I think Pearl Harbor for Americans was much like that.

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