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Lord_Slayer

'Class A Mishap' on USS Abraham Lincoln

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My guess is that if the approach wasn't off, causing them to land too far down the deck, that their speed was too low or the engines not able to bring the aircraft's speed back up high enough in time to fully clear the F-18's on the deck, at which point I'm guessing the props clipped tails that shot debris towards other aircraft and caused punctures.

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Saw one of these when I was on the 'prise in '84.  A Tomcat pilot (F-14) was coming in way off the ball and was waved off for a go-around.  He chose to land anyway.  His right wing hit the back end of an SH 3 and then clipped an S-3 Viking.  He had his wings taken by the CAG before he left the cockpit.

What's really amazing is that given the flight deck crew often works 16 hours a day, that there are hundreds of launches and landings a day making carriers very busy airports, and that the flight deck is as crowded as it is that there are so few accidents.

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10 hours ago, Murotsu said:

Saw one of these when I was on the 'prise in '84.  A Tomcat pilot (F-14) was coming in way off the ball and was waved off for a go-around.  He chose to land anyway.  His right wing hit the back end of an SH 3 and then clipped an S-3 Viking.  He had his wings taken by the CAG before he left the cockpit.

What's really amazing is that given the flight deck crew often works 16 hours a day, that there are hundreds of launches and landings a day making carriers very busy airports, and that the flight deck is as crowded as it is that there are so few accidents.

Yeah, that one is definitely on the pilot. Though, where was he in the approach when the wave off was given? I'm going to assume he was still some distance out that a wave off should have been no issue. But what if he was in close? Could he have safely flew off, or just raise the tailhook and roll through a bolter in a touch and go?

11 hours ago, WanderingGhost said:

My guess is that if the approach wasn't off, causing them to land too far down the deck, that their speed was too low or the engines not able to bring the aircraft's speed back up high enough in time to fully clear the F-18's on the deck, at which point I'm guessing the props clipped tails that shot debris towards other aircraft and caused punctures.

See, that's what I was thinking when I read the article, he must have been off center. Unless the deck crew dropped the ball and had aircraft in the landing zone and no one realized it, it would have to be on the pilot. I suppose the PLAT camera will show if he was off. The article says nothing in regards to the LSO waving him off. Being a bolter, it read like the landing approach was mostly fine, the issue came when he didn't arrest.

Like I said, it would be interesting to read the result of their investigation.

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In the case of my story, I was watching the landings in DC Central on watch with the other watchstanders.  the game was to guess what the next plane landing would be.  The B&W television had crosshairs on it and normally the plane's nose was right dead center on those.  All you could see of this F-14 was the left wing and the nose was barely on the screen.  Everybody commented things like:  "Wave off..."  "He's way off the ball..." "He's going to get razzed for going around..." that sort of thing.  When he landed anyway the $h!+ hit the fan.

They started sounding the crash alarm for the flight deck on the 5MC (there's a repeater in DC Central).  Those look like this:

intercomsysa.jpg

We didn't go to GQ but it wasn't good...

Got to see an A-7 go into the barrier too...  Even found a photo of a similar one on line.  That's how rare those are:

A-7E_of_VA-66_making_barrier_landing_on_

And, even a Whale in the background... (the plane top left)

 

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Never a dull moment on a carrier flight deck.  

On 8/20/2019 at 5:27 PM, Murotsu said:

What's really amazing is that given the flight deck crew often works 16 hours a day, that there are hundreds of launches and landings a day making carriers very busy airports, and that the flight deck is as crowded as it is that there are so few accidents.

Probably because of so much proficiency.  Yeah, mishaps happen, but the US military spends a lot on getting these aviators trained and maintaining proficiency.  With training and operational tempo to go with that, maintenance, aircraft, flight deck handling, etc. follows suit.

 

All these real world operations, regular old cruises, and even sending these very expensive to run boats and aircraft for simple training... That's how we get these guys to run smoothly.

 

An interesting flight deck experience:  In the early 2000s, I was with VMFAT-101 in MCAS Miramar, California.  I get sent to one of those short little CQ dets so our student pilots get their qualifications, etc.  I was in my squadron's Night Crew Electric Shop.  I had my Final Checker qual.  My shift starts and I go to the bow catapults.  Our pilots are still doing their walkarounds, etc, so me and the other Final Checkers were just [edited]'ing and watching the flight ops.  It was now dark.  There was this Hornet from one of the NAS Lemoore training squadrons did a hard landing.  The kind that he smacks the flight deck so hard that the entire carrier is shaking.  He didn't stop though.  I saw this Hornet hit the deck and he's scraping across the angled flight deck, afterburners going, main landing gear collapsed, and skidding on the shredded fuselage tank, sparks flying and all kinds of crazy stuff.  The jet was still able to take off and go back to shore, likely NAS North Island.  Ops were suspended until we had to do several FOD walks to pick up all the pieces.

 

It was crazy, man.  Watching a Hornet cross the flight deck like it was a sled.  The amount of sparks flying reminded me of this scene from Planes, Trains, and Automobiles:

 

Edited by HazeGrayUnderway

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