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SomemuttupNorth

The Brand New Giant Russian Submarine

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Yesterday, the Sevmash shipyards floated out a behemoth of a submarine. This being the Belgorod, topping out at 604 feet long (184 meters) and weighing 30,000 tons submerged, it's the longest submarine in the world.

image

... I say brand new, but the hull's been sitting incomplete since 1992, so some of her is older than some of her enlisted crew, but still.

She's a derivative of the Oscar-II-class of attack submarines, but she does not carry any missiles. Instead, she's designed for special operations, acting as a mothership for covert underwater missions. She does, however, carry six Poseidon "intercontinental" nuclear torpedoes (wat).

So she's a whole bucket of fun, from the looks of it. Also, no, she's not the largest submarine, as the Typhoons beat her in tonnage.

Edited by SomemuttupNorth
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Notice her long range nuclear-tsunami torpedo under her keel....

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The "oceanic multi-purpose Status-6 system" is designed to "destroy important economic installations of the enemy in coastal areas and cause guaranteed devastating damage to the country's territory by creating wide areas of radioactive contamination, rendering them unusable for military, economic or other activity for a long time." The giant torpedo's range is given as "up to 10,000km" (6,200 miles) and depth of trajectory is "up to 1,000m" (3,300ft) and is a "robotic mini-submarine", traveling at 100 knots (185km/h; 115mph), which would "avoid all acoustic tracking devices and other traps".  A warhead of up to 100 megatons could produce a tsunami up to 500m (1,650ft) high, wiping out all living things 1,500km (930 miles) deep inside US territory - Konstantin Sivkov, Russian Geopolitical Academy.

[Never under-estimate the Russians. Time to stop antagonizing them perhaps?]

Edited by Stauffenberg44

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I guess that's one way to try to avoid anti-missile defenses... so now will militaries start developing anti-underwater-missile defenses..?

16 minutes ago, SomemuttupNorth said:

So she's a whole bucket of fun, from the looks of it. Also, no, she's not the largest submarine, as the Typhoons beat her in tonnage.

Typhoon I know was so big because it needed to carry really big missiles... why is this submarine so big, then? Is it those nuclear torpedoes? Or something about those special missions that needs it..?

Edited by Carrier_Ikoma

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give-me-a-ping-vasily-one-ping-only-plea

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Russian claims around weapon system capabilities usually involve a large level of fantasy....

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Put this Submarine in the game...if only as a joke, and then give us Sean Connery as the Captain and matching Voice Overs...   Hahaha  that would be a hoot.

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Massive submarines are fodder for Magnetic Anomaly Detection, or static sonar sensors.  They are slow, and therefore easy prey for hunter-killer subs, and they cannot avoid air-launched weapons very easily.

Super-sized carriers were another fantasy that the US toyed with, but their vulnerability relinquished them to the junk bin.  The same would apply to this fantasy.  But, hey, as an adversary I would encourage the Russians to pursue it with full vigor (political adversaries only...I actually think the Russian people are pretty cool).

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If by "long time" you mean the normal 21 days, then yes. But these suicide torpedoes are just revenge weapons, they have no military purpose.

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9 hours ago, desmo_2 said:

Massive submarines are fodder for Magnetic Anomaly Detection, or static sonar sensors.  They are slow, and therefore easy prey for hunter-killer subs, and they cannot avoid air-launched weapons very easily.

Super-sized carriers were another fantasy that the US toyed with, but their vulnerability relinquished them to the junk bin.  The same would apply to this fantasy.  But, hey, as an adversary I would encourage the Russians to pursue it with full vigor (political adversaries only...I actually think the Russian people are pretty cool).

 

This is not a war fighting sub.  This is a special operations sub.  Its about the malice it can do during peacetime.  Like tap into underwater internet cables.  Or retrieve the next F-35 that crashes into the sea.   Or laying UUVs and autonomous sensors all over the oceans.  Or inserting special forces where ever when ever.   Or surveying the sea bed, the thermal layers.  Its for the same reasons why the innocent looking RS Yantar, a special operations ship excuse me, Deep Sea Research, is considered the most dangerous ship in the Russian Navy.

 

 

Edited by Eisennagel

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Belgorod is not designed for combat.

Khabarovsk. Sarov.

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On 4/25/2019 at 5:44 AM, Eisennagel said:

 

This is not a war fighting sub.  This is a special operations sub.  Its about the malice it can do during peacetime.  Like tap into underwater internet cables.  Or retrieve the next F-35 that crashes into the sea.   Or laying UUVs and autonomous sensors all over the oceans.  Or inserting special forces where ever when ever.   Or surveying the sea bed, the thermal layers.  Its for the same reasons why the innocent looking RS Yantar, a special operations ship excuse me, Deep Sea Research, is considered the most dangerous ship in the Russian Navy.

 

 

One could make an argument for Kazan as considered the most dangerous.

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On 4/25/2019 at 10:35 AM, desmo_2 said:

Massive submarines are fodder for Magnetic Anomaly Detection, or static sonar sensors.  They are slow, and therefore easy prey for hunter-killer subs, and they cannot avoid air-launched weapons very easily.

Super-sized carriers were another fantasy that the US toyed with, but their vulnerability relinquished them to the junk bin.  The same would apply to this fantasy.  But, hey, as an adversary I would encourage the Russians to pursue it with full vigor (political adversaries only...I actually think the Russian people are pretty cool).

 

 

MAD can be contained through degaussing of the submarine, use of nonmagnetic steel alloys and non steel members, although I would doubt the Russians would do something as extreme as build Titanium hulled subs like they did during the Cold War.    Nuclear submarines are not slow, the Alfa class were clocked at over 41 knots.  Nowadays, the speeds are not that extreme but an Akula or Yasen class, such as the Severodvinsk can still reach 35 knots underwater.  

 

 

I do think the Russians "pay" for their submarines with a huge alternative cost --- the cost is paid with not enough funds for their surface fleet.

 

Edited by Eisennagel

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wow so  we are reaching ace combat levels of superweapons?

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7 hours ago, Cruxdei said:

wow so  we are reaching ace combat levels of superweapons?

We have actual nuclear arsenals still.

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