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QQ_Whine_Moar

Stories and Battle Histories of the IJN's Carrier Fleet

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Kaga still had the triple- fly-off deck in 1928.  So three planes could launch at the same time - provided they didn't bang into each other or cause prop-wash stalls.

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1 hour ago, QQ_Whine_Moar said:

That's a nice website for IJN related subjects.  In particular I like the "Pacific Naval Battles of World War II" section.  It gives good, brief summaries and forces involved.

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9 minutes ago, AVR_Project said:

Kaga still had the triple- fly-off deck in 1928.  So three planes could launch at the same time - provided they didn't bang into each other or cause prop-wash stalls.

I had never noticed!

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2 minutes ago, HazeGrayUnderway said:

That's a nice website for IJN related subjects.  In particular I like the "Pacific Naval Battles of World War II" section.  It gives good, brief summaries and forces involved.

This is a great site! Thanks :)

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5 minutes ago, QQ_Whine_Moar said:

I had never noticed!

Kaga and Akagi both had triple decks.  Later, it was two hanger decks and the elevator had some visible girders sticking up at 2nd floor level.

Kaga3.jpg

Edited by AVR_Project

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13 minutes ago, HazeGrayUnderway said:

That's a nice website for IJN related subjects.  In particular I like the "Pacific Naval Battles of World War II" section.  It gives good, brief summaries and forces involved.

The Economic section is interesting reading as well...

I have Tony Tully's two books as well: Shattered Sword, basically Midway from a Japanese viewpoint, and another with Surigao Strait from a Japanese viewpoint.

Interesting new perspectives.  

 

Edited by mavfin87

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2 hours ago, QQ_Whine_Moar said:

Carrier Kaga at Yokosuka Naval Arsenal, Japan, 20 Nov 1928 

ship_kaga6.jpg

That's one heck of a muffler.

But, seriously, the location of both horizontal funnels on both sides made for hellishly hot living conditions in those parts of the ship

From Wikipedia:

Spoiler

Kaga's funnel gases were collected in a pair of long horizontal ducts which discharged at the rear of each side of the flight deck, in spite of predictions by a number of prominent naval architects that they would not keep the hot gases away from the flight deck. The predictions proved to be correct, not least because Kaga was slower than the Akagi which allowed the gases to rise and interfere with landing operations. Another drawback was that the heat of the gases made the crew's quarters located on the side of the ship by the funnels almost uninhabitable.[15]

[15]  Page 134- Lengerer, Hans (1982). "Akagi & Kaga". In Roberts, John (ed.). Warship VI. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-87021-981-2.

 

Edited by Cruiser_SanJuan

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5 minutes ago, Cruiser_SanJuan said:

That's one heck of a muffler.

But, seriously, the location of both horizontal funnels on both sides made for hellishly hot living conditions in those parts of the ship

From Wikipedia:

  Hide contents

Kaga's funnel gases were collected in a pair of long horizontal ducts which discharged at the rear of each side of the flight deck, in spite of predictions by a number of prominent naval architects that they would not keep the hot gases away from the flight deck. The predictions proved to be correct, not least because Kaga was slower than the Akagi which allowed the gases to rise and interfere with landing operations. Another drawback was that the heat of the gases made the crew's quarters located on the side of the ship by the funnels almost uninhabitable.[15]

[15]  Page 134- Lengerer, Hans (1982). "Akagi & Kaga". In Roberts, John (ed.). Warship VI. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-87021-981-2.

 

From what I also understand with those Japanese downward blasting exhaust, it was hell for the crew.  Those pipes were running the length of the ship, as you can see.  It made areas of the ship, often berthing / crew spaces, hot and uncomfortable.  There was also the constant smell of exhaust.  Couple that heat with being out somewhere hot and humid in the Pacific, it sounds like a horrible experience.

 

Some navies cared about how their crew lived, for health, morale, and performance reasons.  US Navy being one.  Some navies didn't give a rat's a**, such as the IJN.

Edited by HazeGrayUnderway

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4 minutes ago, HazeGrayUnderway said:

Some navies cared about how their crew lived.  US Navy being one.  Some navies didnt' give a rat's a**, such as the IJN.

Maybe that's why the Japanese name for the "Tokyo Express" was "Rat Transport" 💀

Correction: Actually it was because the resupply missions were at night

Edited by Cruiser_SanJuan

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36 minutes ago, Cruiser_SanJuan said:

That's one heck of a muffler.

But, seriously, the location of both horizontal funnels on both sides made for hellishly hot living conditions in those parts of the ship

From Wikipedia:

  Reveal hidden contents

Kaga's funnel gases were collected in a pair of long horizontal ducts which discharged at the rear of each side of the flight deck, in spite of predictions by a number of prominent naval architects that they would not keep the hot gases away from the flight deck. The predictions proved to be correct, not least because Kaga was slower than the Akagi which allowed the gases to rise and interfere with landing operations. Another drawback was that the heat of the gases made the crew's quarters located on the side of the ship by the funnels almost uninhabitable.[15]

[15]  Page 134- Lengerer, Hans (1982). "Akagi & Kaga". In Roberts, John (ed.). Warship VI. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-87021-981-2.

 

Sardines in a can..lol

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22 hours ago, QQ_Whine_Moar said:

Sardines in a can..lol

Pre-cooked! :etc_hide_turtle:

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