Jump to content

10 comments in this topic

Recommended Posts

6,083
[KNMSU]
Members
7,086 posts
7,668 battles

I've been watching a series of just amazing daily life videos lately from the 1890s and early 1900s. They may seem a little dull at first, but force yourself to get through a couple before you judge. The time-slowing that's used on the majority of them is just amazing for taking something that would have been hard to relate to, and transforming it into a very real experience. 

 

 

 

 

 

I think the Berlin and Paris ones (the first and last) are, in particular, just enthralling.

The NYC one is also amazing. The last shot is of a walking-beam nautical steam engine (the thing that vaguely resembles a nodding donkey oil pump), which was the same design as on the PS General Slocum.

Edited by Battleship_Elisabeth
  • Cool 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
711
[4HIM]
[4HIM]
Beta Testers
1,830 posts
12,542 battles

One legged guy in the NYC one, could quite possibly be a Civil War vet.  Lost leg, 1965 say at 20, ...67 years old...crazy!  Also...where are the homeless people?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6,083
[KNMSU]
Members
7,086 posts
7,668 battles
27 minutes ago, Morpheous said:

One legged guy in the NYC one, could quite possibly be a Civil War vet.  Lost leg, 1965 say at 20, ...67 years old...crazy!  Also...where are the homeless people?

There are several one-legged guys in the NYC one - the person walking towards the camera at one point looks far too young to be a Civil War veteran. If I had to guess, he likely lost the leg in some kind of industrial accident (which was quite common), though it really could have been due to just about anything, from being run over by a wagon or train, to getting a serious infection. We tend to forget that, before the advent of antibiotics, there were really few options to treat badly-injured limbs; if you were catastrophically injured in the arm or leg, you lost it.

As far as the homeless people are concerned, they're either dead, working bad jobs, or under some kind of government oversight (either in a poorhouse, or a mental institution).

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, people who were seriously broken mentally used to be locked up for life. It might have been ugly from our perspective, but, in a sad sort of way, it was also a lot more progressive than just dumping them on the streets. My guess is that panhandling laws were far more stringently enforced at the time, so you probably couldn't make "a living" panhandling like people (even able-bodied young people, a lot of the time) do today. Now, the flip side of that coin is that a lot of OTHER things that people were institutionalized for at that time (extremely severe depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and so on) can be treated today. But, unfortunately, now as then, there are some people who are just unfixable, and in those cases, it probably isn't humane for them to be freezing on the streets.

The Victorians and Edwardians were pretty concerned about public welfare, but they approached it in a very hands-off manner - you wouldn't see a millionaire in a soup kitchen, but he might be donating all the money to keep said kitchen open (Andrew Carnegie wanted the public to have access to literature, so he funded 3,000 [very, very ornate] libraries across the country; you get the picture). However, their solutions to major social problems were decidedly one-size-fits-all, to the extent that we would likely view some of them as barbaric remedies to very personal problems. 

Edited by Battleship_Elisabeth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,303
[WDS]
[WDS]
Members
2,791 posts
10,099 battles
31 minutes ago, Morpheous said:

One legged guy in the NYC one, could quite possibly be a Civil War vet.  Lost leg, 1965 say at 20, ...67 years old...crazy!  Also...where are the homeless people?

Also I think every singe male including kids had a tie on must have been good to be a tie maker back then .  That was cool thanks for posting .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6,083
[KNMSU]
Members
7,086 posts
7,668 battles

The thing I marvel at - always - is how immaculately dressed people middle-class and up were. The women were in these amazingly long skirts and blouses (or full dresses), frequently carried parasols, and almost always wore huge, flower and cloth-covered straw hats. The men wore full three piece suits, often carried a cane, and wore a wool hat of some kind in the winter (or mink if they could afford it), and straw hats in the summer.

Now, we can argue back and forth all day about convenience and comfort, but the Victorians undoubtedly looked better on a daily basis than we do. I know, as soon as I am off work, I default to sweats and a tee if I want to, say, hit a movie theater. Urbanites in 1900 wouldn't be caught dead looking like that (or wearing, say, jeans). I particularly wish I could see women dress in such lovely ways... but, alas, it's all pantsuits and jeggings :/. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
592
[REVY]
Members
1,850 posts
10,873 battles
14 hours ago, Battleship_Elisabeth said:

There are several one-legged guys in the NYC one - the person walking towards the camera at one point looks far too young to be a Civil War veteran. If I had to guess, he likely lost the leg in some kind of industrial accident (which was quite common), though it really could have been due to just about anything, from being run over by a wagon or train, to getting a serious infection. We tend to forget that, before the advent of antibiotics, there were really few options to treat badly-injured limbs; if you were catastrophically injured in the arm or leg, you lost it.

15 hours ago, Morpheous said:

One legged guy in the NYC one, could quite possibly be a Civil War vet.  Lost leg, 1965 say at 20, ...67 years old...crazy!  Also...where are the homeless people?

 

don't forget, there was the Spanish-American war in 1898.  He could have served there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
711
[4HIM]
[4HIM]
Beta Testers
1,830 posts
12,542 battles
7 hours ago, Lord_Slayer said:

don't forget, there was the Spanish-American war in 1898.  He could have served there.

The guy I was looking at easily looked in his 60s... but very good point...completely forgot about that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
711
[4HIM]
[4HIM]
Beta Testers
1,830 posts
12,542 battles
22 hours ago, Battleship_Elisabeth said:

There are several one-legged guys in the NYC one - the person walking towards the camera at one point looks far too young to be a Civil War veteran. If I had to guess, he likely lost the leg in some kind of industrial accident (which was quite common), though it really could have been due to just about anything, from being run over by a wagon or train, to getting a serious infection. We tend to forget that, before the advent of antibiotics, there were really few options to treat badly-injured limbs; if you were catastrophically injured in the arm or leg, you lost it.

As far as the homeless people are concerned, they're either dead, working bad jobs, or under some kind of government oversight (either in a poorhouse, or a mental institution).

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, people who were seriously broken mentally used to be locked up for life. It might have been ugly from our perspective, but, in a sad sort of way, it was also a lot more progressive than just dumping them on the streets. My guess is that panhandling laws were far more stringently enforced at the time, so you probably couldn't make "a living" panhandling like people (even able-bodied young people, a lot of the time) do today. Now, the flip side of that coin is that a lot of OTHER things that people were institutionalized for at that time (extremely severe depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and so on) can be treated today. But, unfortunately, now as then, there are some people who are just unfixable, and in those cases, it probably isn't humane for them to be freezing on the streets.

The Victorians and Edwardians were pretty concerned about public welfare, but they approached it in a very hands-off manner - you wouldn't see a millionaire in a soup kitchen, but he might be donating all the money to keep said kitchen open (Andrew Carnegie wanted the public to have access to literature, so he funded 3,000 [very, very ornate] libraries across the country; you get the picture). However, their solutions to major social problems were decidedly one-size-fits-all, to the extent that we would likely view some of them as barbaric remedies to very personal problems. 

I was being a bit sarcastic about homeless... people worked... there were few safety nets...work or do not eat.  Poorhouses in England...not sure if they had been done away with in England by that time.  And yes the mentally ill were institutionalized...which I think was a huge mistake in the Reagan administration.  80% of mass shootings in the US have been by folks on mental illness drugs... drugs that are the substitute for not having institutions... main problem, but secondary to that is you can't make folks take their meds...personal rights and all that.

And yes, amazing on how the styles were....think of standing there on a corner in a Tshirt and jeans... you'd get locked up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6,083
[KNMSU]
Members
7,086 posts
7,668 battles
1 hour ago, Morpheous said:

I was being a bit sarcastic about homeless... people worked... there were few safety nets...work or do not eat.  Poorhouses in England...not sure if they had been done away with in England by that time.  And yes the mentally ill were institutionalized...which I think was a huge mistake in the Reagan administration.  80% of mass shootings in the US have been by folks on mental illness drugs... drugs that are the substitute for not having institutions... main problem, but secondary to that is you can't make folks take their meds...personal rights and all that.

And yes, amazing on how the styles were....think of standing there on a corner in a Tshirt and jeans... you'd get locked up!

There were poorhouses in America, too - right up until the middle part of the 20th century. They were more frequently called "poor farms" on this side of the Atlantic, but they definitely existed. 

I wonder if people would be more decent to each other if they were expected to dress like ladies and gentlemen whenever they went out - if looking nice alone also coincides with a desire to act like a classier person. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For security reasons, please do not provide your personal data or the personal data of a third party here because we might be unable to protect such data in accordance with the Wargaming Privacy Policy.

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×