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Komrade_Rylo

Preparing for Navy Boot camp

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February 4th I'm leaving for boot camp and going into the Navy as E3 (thanks to 4 years of JROTC) and I'll be going in as a nuclear machinist. Physically I'm able to pass the PFA with relative ease (still going to keep exercising daily, don't worry) and I've memorized my DEP guide from start to end, and mentally prepared myself to lay low and show my worth through actions instead of words. Any advice I can get from my peoples here on the forums about what else I can do to prepare for basic?  (Please only give advice if you've gone through boot camp)

 

@Pigeon_of_War (notice me senpai)

 

May 2, 2018

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December 24, 2018

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Thanks for serving but I must ask as an overweight aircraft mechanic....

How much weight did you lose in those 8 months and whats the secret? At 205 now and want to be around 160 to180.(I hope the answer isn't quit drinking too lol)

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Wow!  Nice transformation!  When I looked at the first pic I was thinking, "uh, may want to start running...a lot!"  But, looking at your second pic it looks like you shouldn't have any trouble with that!  Well done!

Prepare yourself mentally to be yelled at.  You probably have some experience with that in JROTC, so it shouldn't be the culture shock that seems to affect some.

None of it is personal, even if it is yelled in your ear.

Do what you are told.  How you are told.  When you are told.

Never make excuses.  If you come up short, OWN IT.  Personal accountability is a rare character asset, these days.

Try to get your company to work as a team, as that is what your Company Commanders (or whatever they are called now, I went to boot in '88) are trying to get you to do.  60+ strangers won't come together as a team immediately, so you will earn some nice work outs as you gel.

The first week will be tough, as everything is strange and new, and you are trying to find the routine.  Once you get through that, every day gets a bit easier.  There is fun to be had, as well.

I did 6 years in the USN as an AT, from '88-'94, and made E-5.  My son just re-enlisted for the second time in the Navy, is an AE2, and is in Norfolk.

If you get stationed to Norfolk, don't fret.  Everyone seems to loathe the thought of being stationed in Mother Navy land (as did my son when his San Diego orders from A-school got changed to Norfolk a few days after he got them).  But, he loves it there, now.

From boot camp on, a positive mindset is a powerful thing.  Good luck, sailor!

Edited by desmo_2
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Thank you for serving!   

Be humble.

Boot Camp, you will reflect back later and want to do it again.   

God Speed and Good Luck!

USA - 1980

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Great job in your preparations.  As a 20 Year Navy vet I wish you all the best.  As far as any suggestions, all I can say is just do what they tell you and keep your head up at all times.  You will be tested mentally and physically.  Fair Winds Shipmate to be!!

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1 hour ago, J30_Reinhardt said:

Thanks for serving but I must ask as an overweight aircraft mechanic....

How much weight did you lose in those 8 months and whats the secret? At 205 now and want to be around 160 to180.(I hope the answer isn't quit drinking too lol)

 

1- be 20 years old

2- drink straight black coffee if you don't already, it'll raise your metabolism

3- I ate what I wanted, but I monitored my calories like a hawk, limiting myself to 1700 a day compared to normally eating 3000+ a day

 

I went from 298 in January to 273 in may, but how that weight was lost is a mystery to me, but from may to the beginning of December I got down to 195, and my lowest was 189, but now I'm gaining weight from muscle mass. 

 

I typically run 3 miles every other morning, as well do 50 push-ups when I wake up, then another 50 at night. The days in between I rest my legs, but do 50 crunches in the morning and 50 at night.

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2 hours ago, Komrade_Rylo said:

Any advice I can get from my peoples here on the forums about what else I can do to prepare for basic?  (Please only give advice if you've gone through boot camp)

Way back when, Boot camp was a emotional scaring stage of your Military career. Now, IMO recruits are more babied now compared to say Iraqi Freedom recruits.  That said, you dont have to do exercises in boots anymore. But I recommend he following 

one month before you ship out date,

  • Wake up at 5AM
  • Sleep at 11PM
  • Learn to work/function in a sleep deprived state
  • Pay attention to every small and tedious event of your daily life no matter how insignificant or small.
  • Make sure your sign up for 4 years, nothing less and only more if you can stomach it. Since you're a nuke recruit,  I assume its a 6 yr min. enlistment.
  • Join he Sub fleet, greatest food in the fleet behind destroyer life. Plus they do same of the must Secrete activities only they know about.
  • Detach yourself mentally/emotionally from the family/GF/Wife until your Boot camp time is over
  • WOrk on your pain tolerance while doing exercises.
  • Dont be the comedian, nor the prick when in front of your NCOs during instruction time.
  • 31 minutes ago, Komrade_Rylo said:

    3- I ate what I wanted, but I monitored my calories like a hawk, limiting myself to 1700 a day compared to normally eating 3000+ a day

     

    I went from 298 in January to 273 in may, but how that weight was lost is a mystery to me, but from may to the beginning of December I got down to 195, and my lowest was 189, but now I'm gaining weight from muscle mass. 

    ^^^^^ You can;t go into boot camp with this mentality. Yeah it helped you to lose but now with the increase activity (rust me you will be busy), you need to eat. Weight is not a good indicator of gaining muscle. Body fat % is a better tool to calculate your muscle growth. Use this equation

  • total body weight - (body fat % * Total body wieght)= lean body mass wieght

Time after boot camp

You will not see these guys after BOOT, you will have a few to join you at you pending schools.You will remember the knuckle heads instead of the quite ones. Your school time is a continuation of BOOT but with less Military boot camp shenanigans. Do the best you can,

Joining the fleet and every stage in between.

Avoid CO and Military Tribunal at all cost, your goal is to leave with an honorable discharge. Mess this up and boy that is a life time screw up. 

IF you have any question from here till your deployment to Great Lakes Chicago including where to go on liberty on your final week of Boot before your shipped out. Let me know. 

 

Edited by Navalpride33

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8 minutes ago, Navalpride33 said:
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  • ^^^^^ You can;t go into boot camp with this mentality. Yeah it helped you to lose but now with the increase activity (rust me you will be busy), you need to eat. Weight is not a good indicator of gaining muscle. Body fat % is a better tool to calculate your muscle growth. Use this equation. 

 

 

I'm up to 2900 calories a day now that I'm working on building muscle mass. Limiting calories was just for losing weight when I was too heavy to be able to do a push up. Don't worry

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28 minutes ago, Komrade_Rylo said:

I typically run 3 miles every other morning, as well do 50 push-ups when I wake up, then another 50 at night. The days in between I rest my legs, but do 50 crunches in the morning and 50 at night.

Sounds like the PT won't be a problem at all for you. I played football in high school but not my senior year and by the time I went into the Army I wasn't exactly what you'd call fit. However, the PT quickly got me into shape. It's not that I ever liked it but it was tolerable.

My advice is to take advantage of the free training the military has available. I'd been in for a couple of years before I found out about the low-cost college courses and free Army MOS courses that were available on post. Not to mention that there are a bunch of recreational things available for military personnel to do too.

If you play your cards right and get certifications that have civilian equivalencies you can go right from the military into a high-paying civilian job. You also should make sure to take advantage of any educational benefits. I got my first two degrees compliments of the GI Bill.

There will be considerable "Mickey Mouse" from the NCOs and Brass in training but just put up with it. The yelling and push-ups are meant to toughen you up as the military doesn't want either shrinking violets that cringe at the least little thing or hot heads that lash out when they don't get their way.

Most of all, be proud that you are continuing a fine tradition of those who serve to protect the nation.    

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1 minute ago, Komrade_Rylo said:

I'm up to 2900 calories a day now that I'm working on building muscle mass. Limiting calories was just for losing weight when I was too heavy to be able to do a push up. Don't worry

I dont know what are your training goals are. Boot is more towards Endurance, repeated repetitious motions exercise. I would move your training toward that path.

IF you go the muscle building path. In boot, your muscles will burn off and your back to square one while gaining endurance. Maximize you training toward you goal. 

I wish you luck though, you already ahead of he game then the rest of the recruits.

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15 minutes ago, Navalpride33 said:

I dont know what are your training goals are. Boot is more towards Endurance

Yep, endurance is stressed in the military, both physical and mental. I remember a lot of running. I don't know about the Navy but in the Army we ran 5 kilometers every day. I hated running the first day of Basic and I hated it the day before I was discharged but I was in the best shape of my life too.

I don't know how much marching will be done in the Navy but we usually did ten miles a day to the rifle range and back. Toward the end of Basic we did a 30-mile forced march, not quite at double-time but with rifles and in full field gear. More than anything I think it was to just show us nascent soldiers what we could accomplish.

We also went without sleep a lot. In Basic we were supposed to sleep from 9:30 PM to 4:30 AM (that's 2130 to 0430, better get used to military time). However, we almost never got a full night's sleep as we usually were woken up in the middle of the night for some shenanigans. I've heard that on ship the Navy stands 12 hours on and 12 hours off watches. I know that in the Army when we were in the field or deployed that we just learned to sleep when we could. We never got what was considered a full night's sleep. The old joke about who's the true soldier is true -- he's the guy who's taking a nap. When you are on post, however, it's just like any other job, with some additional military Mickey Mouse. 

Edited by Snargfargle

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I was a very good athlete when I entered the Marine Corps. Physical stamina and conditioning was a minor issue. Mental strength and endurance is a very major issue. If you are a younger person, mental toughness is something you will likely have little experience with, so be prepared to remind yourself that your training will test the limits of your mental toughness maybe more so than your physical stamina.

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Navy Boot was pretty easy actually. I went to Great Lakes and about the only things I didn't like were the cold (I am from Texas, cold is abhorrent to me) and the boredom. The physical stuff was fine if you are in decent shape. I don't remember many people having problems with PT. The book learning you do is pretty easy as well, probably structured around a 9th grade education. The biggest thing I had a problem with was boredom. You spend lots of time sitting around with little to do and lots of time "hurrying up to wait". I read the Blue Jackets manual cover to cover three or four times before we could get actual books. I also spent lots of time writing letters and shining my boots. How you deal with boredom will really make or break you, lots of guys got into trouble because they had so little to do. 

Just remember two things:    Never volunteer...... Never....

And if someone asks who has a driver's license, don't raise your hand..... 

 

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10 hours ago, Taylor3006 said:

And if someone asks who has a driver's license, don't raise your hand..... 

I got a kick out of driving the Army vehicles and drove everything I could get my hands on. I think the most fun I had in the Army was training at Irwin and driving the tracks around. 

My advice is to drive and operate everything that you can. I grew up farming and had driven trucks, tractors, and combines since I was eight years old. However, quite a few people I met in the Army had very little driving experience. All it takes is a "check off" on a military license to get your foot in the door when a civilian employer asks if you've ever, say, driven a fork lift before.

Of course, this is presuming that you are not going to be a "lifer." If you are, then you probably want to take it a bit easier, lest you burn out. Of course, you shouldn't take it too easy. I knew a few guys who had twenty years in and were still only E5s because they had no ambition.

Now, personally, I wanted to get my educational benefits and then get out. I was offered an appointment to the Military Academy and then, later, OCS but that wasn't my plan. I friend of mine and fellow medic went OCS though and ended up retiring as a full colonel. He is now the ROTC director for a large metro area's school system. The kids are pretty much in awe of him when he shows up in his dress blues with those birds on his shoulders. If you scored high on the entrance tests and think that the military might be the thing for you, definitely consider getting a commission.    

 

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2 minutes ago, Snargfargle said:

I got a kick out of driving the Army vehicles and drove everything I could get my hands on. I think the most fun I had in the Army was training at Irwin and driving the tracks around. 

When you are in Navy RTC, when they ask who has a driver's license and people raise their hands, they are given brooms and mops to "drive" while everyone else goes and does something else that is usually more fun. Usually it involves marching everyone over to the Navy Exchange. 

Recruits are prohibited from operating government vehicle, least the Navy recruits are. The Army may have different regulations on this but kind of doubting it. 

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1 hour ago, Taylor3006 said:

When you are in Navy RTC, when they ask who has a driver's license and people raise their hands, they are given brooms and mops to "drive" while everyone else goes and does something else that is usually more fun. Usually it involves marching everyone over to the Navy Exchange. 

Recruits are prohibited from operating government vehicle, least the Navy recruits are. The Army may have different regulations on this but kind of doubting it. 

I've no idea what the regulations are nowadays; I was in the Army over 40 years ago.

I do hate being tricked like that but I guess it's part of the training of life. Parents trick their kids with Santa Claus and other fairy tales all the time.

I'd worked as a janitor at the school after class was out for four years in high school so I already knew my way around a mop and buffer. I drove a jeep out to pull guard duty in Basic. It was ten below zero and we were supposed to have been relieved in four hours. However, they forgot about us so we were out there all night. About 0700 someone came looking for the jeep, not per se us, and told us to hurry and run a mile to the mess hall for chow. We'd been up for 24 hours but did we get to take a nap, nope. We even got into trouble when we showed up to eat with loaded M16s.

Speaking of getting in trouble. This is part of the "Mickey Mouse" I'm referring to. Tick off an NCO or officer and no matter how perfect a soldier you are they are still going to find some obscure regulation violation to pin on you and make you do extra duty.
 

Edited by Snargfargle

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2 hours ago, Taylor3006 said:

When you are in Navy RTC, when they ask who has a driver's license and people raise their hands, they are given brooms and mops to "drive" while everyone else goes and does something else that is usually more fun. Usually it involves marching everyone over to the Navy Exchange. 

Recruits are prohibited from operating government vehicle, least the Navy recruits are. The Army may have different regulations on this but kind of doubting it. 

 

I heard that at the end of 2017, they banned giving us the gift of ice cream parties

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Start getting up at 0430 every day starting now.

Organize your day. Eat and exercise before the sun comes up. Get used to this.

Go to sleep no later than 2200.

Every other night wake up at 2400 and stay up unto 0200. This is to simulate all those crap watches you will have to stand in boot.

 

Study the hell out of your Naval History. There will be four major tests in bootcamp.

Memorize your General Orders.

  • To take charge of this post and all government property in view.
  • To walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert, and observing everything that takes place within sight or hearing.
  • To report all violations of orders I am instructed to enforce.
  • To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guard house than my own.
  • To quit my post only when properly relieved.
  • To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentry who relieves me all orders from the Commanding Officer, Command Duty Officer, Officer of the Deck, and Officers and Petty Officers of the Watch only.
  • To talk to no one except in the line of duty.
  • To give the alarm in case of fire or disorder.
  • To call the Officer of the Deck in any case not covered by instructions.
  • To salute all officers and colors and standards not cased.
  • To be especially watchful at night and during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post, and to allow no one to pass without proper authority.

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8 minutes ago, Komrade_Rylo said:

 

I heard that at the end of 2017, they banned giving us the gift of ice cream parties

 

 

Making it rain and Ice cream parties are still very much a thing.

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2 hours ago, Taylor3006 said:

When you are in Navy RTC, when they ask who has a driver's license and people raise their hands, they are given brooms and mops to "drive" while everyone else goes and does something else that is usually more fun. Usually it involves marching everyone over to the Navy Exchange. 

Recruits are prohibited from operating government vehicle, least the Navy recruits are. The Army may have different regulations on this but kind of doubting it. 

Unless they are looking for more MA's. In that case even if you have a drivers license say that you dont!

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1 minute ago, JollyRoger6969 said:

To salute all officers and colors and standards not cased.

This depends a lot on the officer. Most of the one's I knew, outside of Basic and AIT, when saluted, would say "What the hell are you saluting me for? Do you want to make me a target!" Different times I guess.

Also memorize your Chain of Command, from your squad leader to the president. You might as well start with the rote memorization stuff as soon as you can in Basic. Do it when falling asleep, it's a good way to take your mind off the aches and pains.

Once you get to your permanent station nobody will give a damn about all that memorization stuff, you will have enough real-world stuff going on in maintaining your equipment and being an actual soldier. What it does is to teach you to learn things that need learned, even boring things. 

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1 hour ago, JollyRoger6969 said:

Start getting up at 0430 every day starting now.

Organize your day. Eat and exercise before the sun comes up. Get used to this.

Go to sleep no later than 2200.

Every other night wake up at 2400 and stay up unto 0200. This is to simulate all those crap watches you will have to stand in boot.

 

Study the hell out of your Naval History. There will be four major tests in bootcamp.

Memorize your General Orders.

  • To take charge of this post and all government property in view.
  • To walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert, and observing everything that takes place within sight or hearing.
  • To report all violations of orders I am instructed to enforce.
  • To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guard house than my own.
  • To quit my post only when properly relieved.
  • To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentry who relieves me all orders from the Commanding Officer, Command Duty Officer, Officer of the Deck, and Officers and Petty Officers of the Watch only.
  • To talk to no one except in the line of duty.
  • To give the alarm in case of fire or disorder.
  • To call the Officer of the Deck in any case not covered by instructions.
  • To salute all officers and colors and standards not cased.
  • To be especially watchful at night and during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post, and to allow no one to pass without proper authority.

 

1 hour ago, Snargfargle said:

This depends a lot on the officer. Most of the one's I knew, outside of Basic and AIT, when saluted, would say "What the hell are you saluting me for? Do you want to make me a target!" Different times I guess.

Also memorize your Chain of Command, from your squad leader to the president. You might as well start with the rote memorization stuff as soon as you can in Basic. Do it when falling asleep, it's a good way to take your mind off the aches and pains.

Once you get to your permanent station nobody will give a damn about all that memorization stuff, you will have enough real-world stuff going on in maintaining your equipment and being an actual soldier. What it does is to teach you to learn things that need learned, even boring things. 

 

Apart from training exercises and drill, the DEP start guide I memorized that they gave us at meps has everything from the 11 general orders of the sentry, to aircraft and ship designations, to chain of command, ranks, and more. Alot of the stuff I already knew from being captian of our JROTC JLAB team, as well as a naval history fanatic as well. 

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I wasn't in the Navy, but my brother was.

If you are good at running, don't show off, but don't sandbag.

My brother ran cross country and track in high school.

He sandbagged the running (finishing about middle), until they found out about it.

They found something he wasn't good at (I forget what it was), and made him do it till he was good.

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