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So_lt_Goes

Day of Infamy

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For US Navy veterans, or anyone else who's been there, the sadness at the Arizona Memorial is palpable. Like walking the fields of Ypres or crossing Burnside's Bridge at Antietam, the dead call out to us. We do not forget. The only glory in war belongs to the warriors.

Rest well, shipmates. We have the watch.

 

Edited by So_lt_Goes
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11 minutes ago, So_lt_Goes said:

For US Navy veterans, or anyone else who's been there, the sadness at the Arizona Memorial is palpable. Like walking the fields of Ypres or crossing Burnside's Bridge at Antietam, the dead call out to us. We do not forget. The only glory in war belongs to the warriors.

Rest well, shipmates. We have the watch.

 

:Smile_honoring:

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ironic, When I clicked this post, It was posted 41 minutes ago.

 

I cannot even fathom the amount of carnage at that very site 70+ years ago

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11 minutes ago, Gary_P said:

ironic, When I clicked this post, It was posted 41 minutes ago.

 

I cannot even fathom the amount of carnage at that very site 70+ years ago

What’s a trip is they did an ‘inside the Arizona’ bit recently; there was a desire to understand the current state of things inside the wreck. (Park service?)

One thing they found was a uniform hanging in a cabin; probably as fragile as wet tissue; but a tangible reminder of the lives the ship once held.

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Thanks for this Post Sir. I re-enlisted for the last time at the Arizona memorial and I still treasure the American Flag that was given to me which flew above the monument on that day. There is a powerful emotion that still rolls up from Arizona, as you can still see her very clearly through the crystal blue Hawaii water and the oil slowly dribbles up to the surface. The Mighty Mo now stands gaurd over Arizona’s tomb, just a stones throw away. Let’s remember the men who lost their lives in an instant on Arizona when a dive bomber detonated her, and the men who suffered the horror of being trapped in the capsized Oklahoma, and all of the others who died on that day. People have short memories, too short. Our Militaries are on the front lines even in peacetime, because when war finally comes it always hits forward positions/bases like Pearl first.

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1 hour ago, So_lt_Goes said:

For US Navy veterans, or anyone else who's been there, the sadness at the Arizona Memorial is palpable. Like walking the fields of Ypres or crossing Burnside's Bridge at Antietam, the dead call out to us. We do not forget. The only glory in war belongs to the warriors.

Rest well, shipmates. We have the watch.

 

When I go to Antietam the two places I can feel the presence of the soldiers is at the cornfield and the sunken road. 

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28 minutes ago, IAMMUDBONE said:

Thanks for this Post Sir. I re-enlisted for the last time at the Arizona memorial and I still treasure the American Flag that was given to me which flew above the monument on that day. There is a powerful emotion that still rolls up from Arizona, as you can still see her very clearly through the crystal blue Hawaii water and the oil slowly dribbles up to the surface. The Mighty Mo now stands gaurd over Arizona’s tomb, just a stones throw away. Let’s remember the men who lost their lives in an instant on Arizona when a dive bomber detonated her, and the men who suffered the horror of being trapped in the capsized Oklahoma, and all of the others who died on that day. People have short memories, too short. Our Militaries are on the front lines even in peacetime, because when war finally comes it always hits forward positions/bases like Pearl first.

Thank you for sharing your experience, and thank you for your service.

Carry on! :Smile_honoring:

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A day I never forget as it is also my daughters birthday today and I am a native Arizonan. The deed itself is what I never forget, the cold bloodedness of the attack itself rather than continue to strive for peace this was the only course of action that Japan thought it could find. This is the kind of crap China and Russia seem to be willing to perhaps entertain themselves doing and seem to have demonstrated the willingness to.

NEVER FORGET AMERICA!

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1 hour ago, Gary_P said:

ironic, When I clicked this post, It was posted 41 minutes ago.

 

I cannot even fathom the amount of carnage at that very site 70+ years ago

I can have some sort of idea sadly, because I was in upstate New York ground zero for when they got slammed with those 2 major hurricanes back to back. Steel that was once precisely laid and shaped gets torn and twisted, I saw bridges reduced to what looked like a giant bowl of steel spaghetti. I went up to one of the mountain towns that had gotten hit hard and was scheduled for a second hit to help Evac some family out of the area after the first hurricane had hit. The mountains in New New York and Hurricanes mix with horrific and fatal results by creating massive flash floods in mountain areas and getting to safety could be a problem. If I had not known otherwise I could have guessed waves of B-52 Bombers had carpet bombed the place except moisture replaced the scorching bomb blasts would create. Crazy how weather can create what looks like a war zone.

I imagine Pearl Harbor while different, was probably rather similar. Wet, fires burning, what was once invincible looking steel constructions twisted and broken by the blasts. friends and families grieving the dead and sobbing or their dead loved ones, a sense of stunned shock as if this can’t possibly be real, wondering what will happen next or if you are finally out of danger only to find out another horrible wave of disaster is incoming, having to scramble and get to safety.  The memories seared into your head, sounds and images you can never forget no matter how much time passes it feels fresh as if it were yesterday.

 

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15 minutes ago, Admiral_Thrawn_1 said:

I can have some sort of idea sadly, because I was in upstate New York ground zero for when they got slammed with those 2 major hurricanes back to back. Steel that was once precisely laid and shaped gets torn and twisted, I saw bridges reduced to what looked like a giant bowl of steel spaghetti. I went up to one of the mountain towns that had gotten hit hard and was scheduled for a second hit to help Evac some family out of the area after the first hurricane had hit. The mountains in New New York and Hurricanes mix with horrific and fatal results by creating massive flash floods in mountain areas and getting to safety could be a problem. If I had not known otherwise I could have guessed waves of B-52 Bombers had carpet bombed the place except moisture replaced the scorching bomb blasts would create. Crazy how weather can create what looks like a war zone.

I imagine Pearl Harbor while different, was probably rather similar. Wet, fires burning, what was once invincible looking steel constructions twisted and broken by the blasts. friends and families grieving the dead and sobbing or their dead loved ones, a sense of stunned shock as if this can’t possibly be real, wondering what will happen next or if you are finally out of danger only to find out another horrible wave of disaster is incoming, having to scramble and get to safety.  The memories seared into your head, sounds and images you can never forget no matter how much time passes it feels fresh as if it were yesterday.

 

hurricanes are pretty scary crap,volcanoes are normally a local event(unless it's yellowstone super volcano),earthquakes are quick. hurricanes are slow,destroy everything and are currently bigger than any other natural disaster(the great red spot and SOLAR TORNADOES for example).

Edited by Cruxdei

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35 minutes ago, C_D said:

A day I never forget as it is also my daughters birthday today and I am a native Arizonan. The deed itself is what I never forget, the cold bloodedness of the attack itself rather than continue to strive for peace this was the only course of action that Japan thought it could find. This is the kind of crap China and Russia seem to be willing to perhaps entertain themselves doing and seem to have demonstrated the willingness to.

NEVER FORGET AMERICA!

There weren't a lot of options for Japan that didn't require a lot of death and destruction... EXCEPT for somehow accepting being dominated by everyone around her. 

The vast majority of wars are fought for choices made in cold blood.  The West (and the Allies before that) made some seriously cold blooded choices too.  Sadly, the West, including America, aren't above making the same sorts of plans.

Pearl Harbour was a tragic outcome, and deserves to be remembered, and the dead do deserve our respect and honour.,

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1 hour ago, Nukelavee45 said:

There weren't a lot of options for Japan that didn't require a lot of death and destruction... EXCEPT for somehow accepting being dominated by everyone around her.

Well, not invading Manchuria in 1931 was certainly an option. This was purely militaristic colonial adventurism. There were no sanctions, embargoes, or aggression directed at Japan in 1931. The Manchuria affair was the lighted fuse.

Clausewitz was right all along. Wars are political, arranged by politicians.

Sadly, as always, it is the warriors and their countrymen/women  who pay the price.

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3 hours ago, So_lt_Goes said:

Well, not invading Manchuria in 1931 was certainly an option. This was purely militaristic colonial adventurism. There were no sanctions, embargoes, or aggression directed at Japan in 1931. The Manchuria affair was the lighted fuse.

Clausewitz was right all along. Wars are political, arranged by politicians.

Sadly, as always, it is the warriors and their countrymen/women  who pay the price.

Manchuria was the fuse from the Western point of view.  At least teh spark...personally, I'm of the opinion that their whole expansionist adventure was realizing they had been denying the future too long, realized that,based on the world they knew, war was the only way to grab the territory and wealth to become a "Great" power.

I think the idea of becoming a "race of merchants" insulted leadership's pride far too much.

I agree with what you said, though.

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8 hours ago, UssIowaSailor said:

When I go to Antietam the two places I can feel the presence of the soldiers is at the cornfield and the sunken road. 

You can feel the same at the Devils den and Little Round Top at Gettysburg.

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