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dmckay

I don't want coal!!!

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Coal was just about done as a fuel for warships by WWI.  Oil was the deal and also this was true in WWII. Is this a troll thread?  NO!  Were there any coal fired warships still in use in WWII?  Any? I like info cause I am an info freak. Or...just a freak. :Smile_sad:  Can't find any on my own....maybe someone knows.  Like an expert.

Edited by dmckay
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Perhaps it's time you joined a clan so you have access to pump oil and enter the modern age.

 

KIYRABX.gif

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3 minutes ago, RipNuN2 said:

Perhaps it's time you joined a clan so you have access to pump oil and enter the modern age.

 

KIYRABX.gif

I live in the past!  Ha.  Gee I thought it was kinda a cool question.

Edited by dmckay

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20 minutes ago, dmckay said:

I live in the past!  Ha.  Gee I thought it was kinda a cool question.

 

Only one I know of as far as warships go is Schleswig-Holstein as she still had 2 coal fired boilers. I'm would imagine some of smaller and older support craft in some of the navies were still coal fired.

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1 hour ago, dmckay said:

Coal was just about done as a fuel for warships by WWI.  Oil was the deal and also this was true in WWII. Is this a troll thread?  NO!  Were there any coal fired warships still in use in WWII?  Any? I like info cause I am an info freak. Or...just a freak. :Smile_sad:  Can't find any on my own....maybe someone knows.  Like an expert.

During the Dreadnought era and during WWI many ships were were still coal-fired. The New York battleships were coal-fired until 1926. In WWII I'd say that there were still coal-fired merchant ships. My uncle rode on a coal-fired train on his way to the Army in 1960.

Edited by Snargfargle

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5 minutes ago, Snargfargle said:

During the Dreadnought era and during WWI many ships were were still coal-fired. The New York battleships were coal-fired until 1926. In WWII I'd say that there were still coal-fired merchant ships. My uncle rode on a coal-fired train on his way the the Army in 1960.

TKS.  In the first grade back in 1956 there was a railroad near where I lived that went by the feed mill and a general store. Was at that littler store with my Mom and a coal fired locomotive stopped and the crew got out to get pop and snacks. I was up close looking at it and one of the crew let me get in the cab and I got to blow the whistle!  It was cool.They had to move on cause they did not want to get azz ended by the next train coming so it was a brief visit. Last coal locomotive I ever saw in these here parts where I live in Ohio. I remember it was HOT in that cab.:Smile_honoring:

Ya probably just some merchant ships by WWII. 

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14 minutes ago, dmckay said:

TKS.  In the first grade back in 1956 there was a railroad near where I lived that went by the feed mill and a general store. Was at that littler store with my Mom and a coal fired locomotive stopped and the crew got out to get pop and snacks. I was up close looking at it and one of the crew let me get in the cab and I got to blow the whistle!  It was cool.They had to move on cause they did not want to get azz ended by the next train coming so it was a brief visit. Last coal locomotive I ever saw in these here parts where I live in Ohio. I remember it was HOT in that cab.:Smile_honoring:

Ya probably just some merchant ships by WWII. 

 

If you ever visit Duluth, Minnesota, they have an excellent train museum with many examples you can walk through and check out in detail. It's called the Lake Superior Railroad Museum.

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3 minutes ago, RipNuN2 said:

 

If you ever visit Duluth, Minnesota, they have an excellent train museum with many examples you can walk through and check out in detail. It's called the Lake Superior Railroad Museum.

Tks. Those old locomotives are fascinating. 

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1 hour ago, dmckay said:

Coal was just about done as a fuel for warships by WWI.  Oil was the deal and also this was true in WWII. Is this a troll thread?  NO!  Were there any coal fired warships still in use in WWII?  Any? I like info cause I am an info freak. Or...just a freak. :Smile_sad:  Can't find any on my own....maybe someone knows.  Like an expert.

Extremely limited view of the usefulness of coal.

Coal is instrumental in the refining of iron ore to into steel, so no matter how you slice it coal was/is instrumental in the production of ships.

Not to mention in the generation of electricity to run shipyards and naval bases.

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The reason we get coal as individuals is oil was already in use for clans. Coal was still a major fuel for ships in WWI although there was a push to switch to oil because it was cleaner burning and ships could carry more oil than coal which increased range. DD's were the first ships to make the switch. Coal was still a common fuel for merchant ships in WWII because it was cheap.

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What's coal?
*shovels old baguettes into the boilers of my Republique*

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I once lived in a house that still had a coal chute. The boiler, which heated the water for the radiators, had been converted from coal to oil and, finally, to gas. To say that it was not very efficient was an understatement. That was one of the coldest winters in the area, with temperatures never getting above zero (that's F), for a month and the boiler barely kept the old, un-insulated, house above freezing. 

Edited by Snargfargle

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6 hours ago, MannyD_of_The_Sea said:

Extremely limited view of the usefulness of coal.

Coal is instrumental in the refining of iron ore to into steel, so no matter how you slice it coal was/is instrumental in the production of ships.

Not to mention in the generation of electricity to run shipyards and naval bases.

I know.  But I was not referring to anything you mention.  Pls reread my original post. I was referring to FUEL in WWII. Carry on.

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6 hours ago, BrushWolf said:

The reason we get coal as individuals is oil was already in use for clans. Coal was still a major fuel for ships in WWI although there was a push to switch to oil because it was cleaner burning and ships could carry more oil than coal which increased range. DD's were the first ships to make the switch. Coal was still a common fuel for merchant ships in WWII because it was cheap.

Merchant ships.  Ok.  Tks.  That was what I was asking! :Smile_honoring:

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43 minutes ago, Snargfargle said:

I once lived in a house that still had a coal chute. The boiler, which heated the water for the radiators, had been converted from coal to oil and, finally, to gas. To say that it was not very efficient was an understatement. That was one of the coldest winters in the area, with temperatures never getting above zero (that's F), for a month and the boiler barely kept the old, uninstalled, house above freezing. 

After my Dad quite farming when I was 12 we lived in a house that had a coal burning furnace in the basement for about 2 years.  Had to shovel coal every morning into the damn thing.  I know what you are talking about. My Mom hated it.  Dirty. 

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31 minutes ago, dmckay said:

After my Dad quite farming when I was 12 we lived in a house that had a coal burning furnace in the basement for about 2 years.  Had to shovel coal every morning into the damn thing.  I know what you are talking about. My Mom hated it.  Dirty. 

I grew up with a corn-burning furnace for our farmhouse. A rather unique device and produced an equally unique smell. All that was left over was some ash that we'd just use on our driveway for grip on the ice.

Somewhere along the timeline we got rid of it, big mistake, that thing was built to last

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1 hour ago, dmckay said:

I know.  But I was not referring to anything you mention.  Pls reread my original post. I was referring to FUEL in WWII. Carry on.

I freaking READ WHAT YOU WROTE, THUS MY ENTIRELY CORRECT ASSERTION that your view of the applicability of coal was limited. Your view is no less limited upon a second reading, but rather is more myopic than before because you were extended sufficient information to broaden your perspective.

Pls reconsider your need to be a putz. Carry on.

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5 minutes ago, MannyD_of_The_Sea said:

I freaking READ WHAT YOU WROTE, THUS MY ENTIRELY CORRECT ASSERTION that your view of the applicability of coal was limited. Your view is no less limited upon a second reading, but rather is more myopic than before because you were extended sufficient information to broaden your perspective.

Pls reconsider your need to be a putz. Carry on.

I was talking about FUEL for ships.  SHIPS!  What in the hell are you talking about? You go off on electricity and and iron and stuff utterly unrelated to what I asked. Again.....reread my original question.  Are you looking for some kinda p#s#sing contest?  That is my entirely correct assumption.  LOL. I never said a thing about the overall applicability of coal. That is in your confused mind,. Dude....go to bed. I am in no mode for late night messed up confused Cretans. 

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1 hour ago, Chobittsu said:

I grew up with a corn-burning furnace for our farmhouse. A rather unique device and produced an equally unique smell. All that was left over was some ash that we'd just use on our driveway for grip on the ice.

Somewhere along the timeline we got rid of it, big mistake, that thing was built to last

My next-door neighbors have a corn-burning furnace. I hate it when they crank it up as it produces acrid smoke that smells like burning plastic (I doubt that they have it set right). Most everyone else around here uses natural gas, which is about as clean-burning as you can get.

Edited by Snargfargle

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Speaking of coal, Diesel originally designed his engine to run on coal dust as there were mountains of the stuff piled up near his home and he was looking for a cheap source of fuel for his new internal combustion engine invention. He switched to oil after his engine blew up.

If you've ever worked around any organic dust you will know that it's highly explosive. Several grain elevators explode each year. Our local elevator had the side blown out of it back when I was in college; the patch can still be seen.

When I was in high school, and everyone in town still burned trash, I and a couple other boys were tasked to empty the shop's large sawdust bin, which weighed a couple hundred pounds. There was a small fire still burning in the trash pit when we dumped that sawdust on it. The explosion flung us all back ten feet. Of course, being American boys back before "safe spaces" were invented, we though that this was just about the coolest thing ever and spent the rest of the year trying to figure out how to get other things to explode.

Edited by Snargfargle

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2 hours ago, Snargfargle said:

My next-door neighbors have a corn-burning furnace. I hate it when they crank it up as it produces acrid smoke that smells like burning plastic (I doubt that they have it set right). Most everyone else around here uses natural gas, which is about as clean-burning as you can get.

Yah, that sounds really wrong...  You might wanna tell em to double check they have it set right

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19 hours ago, Snargfargle said:

Speaking of coal, Diesel originally designed his engine to run on coal dust as there were mountains of the stuff piled up near his home and he was looking for a cheap source of fuel for his new internal combustion engine invention. He switched to oil after his engine blew up.

If you've ever worked around any organic dust you will know that it's highly explosive. Several grain elevators explode each year. Our local elevator had the side blown out of it back when I was in college; the patch can still be seen.

When I was in high school, and everyone in town still burned trash, I and a couple other boys were tasked to empty the shop's large sawdust bin, which weighed a couple hundred pounds. There was a small fire still burning in the trash pit when we dumped that sawdust on it. The explosion flung us all back ten feet. Of course, being American boys back before "safe spaces" were invented, we though that this was just about the coolest thing ever and spent the rest of the year trying to figure out how to get other things to explode.

Any boiler is a controlled explosion.  Coal is the worst because both oil and natural gas "flow" better than coal does (in the case of a boiler).  The systems in coal boilers for control are much more involved than the other two.

Coal was (and is depending on the size of the boiler) used because it is cheap as a fuel.  And here in the U.S., we have a lot of it.

I spent a number of years working for a major food processing company, upgrading their electrical system.  The scariest places on the site was their corn storage silos. Those things are more dangerous than an oxygen tent for a spark.

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