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Ships that earned WoWS medals in real-life

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Hello guys, it's me again: that guy who keeps submitting hilarious and informative write-ups but has never played anything more advanced than a St. Louis. This time, we're going to be looking at the various medals you can get in World of Warships and see which warships got those medals in Real Life. Now, I'm not going to be covering every single medal obviously, medals reliant on HP will not be taken into consideration for obvious reasons. I also won't be awarding "Close-Quarters Expert" medals given the fact that using secondary batteries to sink enemy ships was not that uncommon. "First Blood" medals will also be ignored for similar but much more apparent reasons and the general chaos going on in warfare makes it impossible to award "Clear Sky" medals. In fact, I seriously doubt one was ever even earned. Also, I am sticking solely to dreadnoughts and treaty cruisers in terms of big-gun warships. Pre-dreadnoughts, protected cruisers, armored cruisers, or scout cruisers need not apply. Lastly, for the purposes of counting, ships that were rendered combat-ineffective will be regarded as "sunk". The reason being that if The First Battle of Guadalcanal were a Ships match, the damage Hiei took would have gotten her sunk that night.

First up, we have the ever humiliating but always engaging:

DETONATION
Detonation.png.729080f7845d9058c36d8fd40d81d839.png
(Thanks for showing up)

Ah yes, the "Fun and Engaging" medal that's a consolation prize for being trolled by RNG. To apply this to real life, I'll be counting any powder magazine detonation that doomed the ship. There are ships that blew up that I won't be including, for example HMS Barham and Yamato blew up but they were already screwed by that point and the aircraft carrier Shōkaku also blew up but she was ultimately done in by the fires started by the explosion. I'll also be adding a house rule here that Escort Carriers are not allowed to gain this medal due to the fact that, of the 13 Escort Carriers sunk by enemy action during World War II, 6 of them blew up making this method of sinking far too common for such special recognition as a medal. I will at least mention HMS Dasher (D37) of the Avenger-class which blew up for no apparent reason. Another house rule is that Destroyers are not eligible for Detonation medals since there is no way in hell I am tracking down every single destroyer that sunk in action and figuring out whether or not the powder magazines blew up. With that out of the way, the first three "Detonation" medals were earned at:

The Battle of Jutland
(There seems to be something wrong with our bloody ships today!)

Ah yes, I can't award Detonation medals without mentioning Beatty's battlecruisers. HMS Queen Mary, HMS Indefatigable, and HMS Invincible were sent to scout ahead of the main British fleet in order to locate the German fleet. This inevitably got the British Battlecruisers into a gunnery duel with enemy German Battlecruisers but while British doctrine at the time gave them the advantage in Rate of Fire, German doctrine gave them the advantage in damage resistance. The two battlecruiser squadrons sighted each other by 15:30 hours and opened fire at 15:48 hours. The British tendency to ignore safety precautions in order to improve rate of fire led to disaster when, at 16:02 hours, Indefatigable was hit in her "A" turret magazine blowing her in half and leaving only 2 survivors. Pretty soon after that, at 16:25, both of Queen Mary's forward magazines blew up in a massive deflagration leaving only 9 survivors. By 18:00 hours, both scouting fleets had managed to link up with their main battlelines containing proper battleships, which began to add their substantial firepower to the mix but the Brits weren't out of the woods yet. At 18:31 hours, HMS Invincible, captained by Rear-Admiral Horace Hood, blew up, split in half, and took all but six of her crew to Davey Jones' Locker. Admiral Hood was not among the survivors. After the Battle of Jutland ended in a draw, the Royal Navy decided to honor the memory of Admiral Hood by naming their most advanced battlecruiser after him. I dare say many of you might have already heard about this battlecruiser but if you haven't, trust me, you'll be hearing about her soon.

Proper Powder Storage Saves Lives:

Although these were the first "Detonation" medals received during the Age of Dreadnoughts, they were also the last awarded during World War I... in combat. With that in mind, let's talk about the many battleships of various nations that blew up in port. Now you might be sitting there thinking: "Wow, those idiots really didn't know anything did they, lol," but you do need to understand that the cordite that was used for battleship guns back then was highly flammable and had a nasty tendency to decompose into something far more volatile. The first Battleship to succumb to "Old Cordite Syndrome" was the Italian Conte Di Cavour-class battleship Leonardo Da Vinci on August 2, 1916. You'd think that the Italian Navy would do everything they can to prevent this from happening again but instead of blaming poor powder storage, they instead placed the blame on Austro-Hungarian saboteurs. Pretty soon afterwards, on October 20, 1916, the lead battleship of the Russian Imperatritsa Mariya-class suffered a fire in the forward powder magazine that soon led to an explosion. This time, the investigation properly pointed to the volatile nitrocellulose propellant as the culprit but while the Imperatritsa Mariya was salvageable, the repair work was constantly interrupted by such piddling events as the Russian Revolution and the Bolshevik Uprising until the Soviet government just gave up and scrapped her. On July 9, 1917, HMS Vanguard became the third victim of volatile powder and blew up while docked in Scapa Flow. A Board of Inquiry was unable to decisively determine the cause of the explosion but their best theory noted that the powder on board was past its shelf life and that the boilers were operating with most of the watertight doors open which may have led to excessive levels of heat getting into the powder magazines. The final such battleship, sunk on July 12, 1918, was the Japanese Kawachi, lead ships of the Kawachi-class dreadnoughts, which you might be familiar with. An inquiry found no reason to suspect anyone of arson and while decomposed cordite was suspected, the powder had been given a clean bill of health back in February. This led the Japanese to create stricter controls on the production and storage of cordite and the Kawachi was the last warship to be lost to port-side explosion for a long while.

The Battle of the Denmark Strait
(Will they ever learn?)

Moving on to World War II, remember the HMS Hood that I mentioned earlier? Well, history has a rather cruel way of repeating as is shown by the Battle of the Denmark Strait on May 24 of 1941. For those of you who have been living under a rock, this battle pitted the mighty Hood and HMS Prince of Wales against the heavy cruiser Prinz Eugen and the legendary German battleship Bismarck. To the best of my knowledge, Bismarck hit Hood only twice throughout the entire engagement. The first shell, which may have come from Prinz Eugen hit the 4-inch ammunition locker starting a fire on deck. The second shell detonated in Hood's powder magazines at 0600 hours causing Hood to, like HMS Invincible before her, blow up, split in half, and take all but three of her crew to Davey Jones' Locker. I'm sure her namesake was proud of her for following in his footsteps. (lol)

The Attack on Pearl Harbor

Now if you thought only Battlecruisers exploded, you'd be wrong. The second Detonation medal of WWII goes to the Pennsylvania-class battleship USS Arizona (BB-39) for her "service" during the Attack on Pearl Harbor. I won't spend too much time on what happened since you probably know that already and if you don't, what the hell is wrong with the public education system? The Japanese aircraft that attacked Arizona were dive bombers that were fitted with 16-inch shells jury-rigged to become 800 kg armor-piercing bombs. At 08:06 hours, one of these bombs managed to hit the powder magazine for the #2 turret causing a massive fireball to go 500 feet up into the air and killing 1,172 of the 1,512 crewmen on board. Most of the battleships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor were eventually recovered but Arizona was not one of those. You can still see her beneath the waves of Pearl Harbor today.

The Battle of the Coral Sea
(We have to do something about this avgas problem)

Before WWII, the USS Lexington (CV-2) was a rockstar of the American carrier forces and she managed to prove her mettle time and again in Fleet Problems and exercises. Unfortunately, Fleet Problems are NOT real life and in the Lexington's first engagement at the Battle of the Coral Sea, she was sunk by a problem that no exercise could have foreseen. At midday of May 8th, 1942, Lexington and Yorktown came under concerted dive and torpedo-bomber attack from the aircraft carriers Shōkaku and Zuikaku. Results from the dive bombers were disappointing. The torpedo bombers had different results but while Yorktown's torpedobeats as a small, maneuverable, Yorktown-class carrier were strong, Lexington's as a larger, clunkier, Lexington-class converted battlecruiser were not. Lexington took two torpedos on the port side jamming two elevators in the up position, shutting down three boilers, breaching several fuel bunkers but most importantly, cracking the port aviation fuel tank. At first, damage to the Lexington seemed severe but manageable but fumes from the aviation fuel tank soon started spreading everywhere. And then they blew up. This explosion proved to be too much for "Lady Lex" and after most of her crew were safely evacuated, she was scuttled by the destroyer USS Phelps thus awarding USS Lexington (CV-2) a Detonation medal. The sinking of the Lexington sent a shock throughout the American High Command and they quickly moved to discover a way to prevent Avgas fumes from sinking any more of their precious aircraft carriers. This was achieved by flooding the fueling lines with carbon dioxide whenever any sort of danger was discovered and if a Avgas leak did occur, it would be confined to as few rooms as possible. As an interesting coda, workers at Quincy shipyard were so aggrieved by the loss of the mighty carrier that they decided that there was no way they would complete the Essex-class carrier USS Cabot. It would instead be called the Lexington.

The Battle of Midway
(This one's for you Lexi)

Let us first take a flashback to March 14, 1930. Fleet Problem 10 was well underway pitting Black team with Lexington leading the air wing against the Blue team, whose carriers consisted of Saratoga and Langley. At 0600, Lexington launched three scouts to locate the Blue carriers after which a follow-up strike could be initiated. At 0810, the scouts managed to find Saratoga and at 0829, a full-bore dive bomber strike from Lexington caught Saratoga's aircraft on deck with all of their ordnance out in the open. The umpires ruled the damage to Saratoga as nothing short of catastrophic. The "secondary explosions" turned the Saratoga into a "burning wreck" and Langley was soon put out of action as well. This stunning success left the Blue battleline at the mercy of Black airpower ensuring a Black victory. Fast forward to June 4, 1942 at the Battle of Midway and some of the more astute among you might already see where I'm going. When Isoroku Yamamoto planned the Battle of Midway in order to ensure the destruction of the American carrier forces, he and his staff spent the better portion of six months planning and wargaming in order to come up with a victory. The Americans, on the other hand, decided on their strategy within hours. They would let the island of Midway absorb carrier strikes from the Japanese Task Force and then send a dive and torpedo-bomber strike in order to catch the carriers' warplanes on deck with their substantial ordnance wide in the open. The Japanese Task Force commander, Chuichi Nagumo, was caught off guard when he realized that American carriers had entered the warzone long before they were supposed to, especially since he had just armed his aircraft for a second strike on Midway Island. Failing to truly appreciate the danger, he ordered his carriers to switch their anti-ground ordnance to anti-ship ordnance and ignored safety protocols in order to make the switch happen faster. American dive bombers managed to arrive just in the nick of time to catch Akagi, Kaga, and Sōryū's aircraft on deck with all of their ordnance unprotected or out in the open. The damage to the three carriers was nothing short of catastrophic. The secondary explosions turned Akagi, Kaga, and Sōryū into burning wrecks and by the end of the day, the final carrier, Hiryū, was put out of action as well. The Detonation medals handed to Akagi, Kaga, and Sōryū in such a short space of time made the Battle of Midway a stunning victory for the US Navy and proved to be the turning point of the Pacific War.

Right Place, Wrong Time:

In the aftermath of the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway, the US Navy's carrier arm was starting to feel strained in the Pacific, especially since they could only count on three operational flattops: Saratoga, Enterprise, and Hornet. With that in mind, US commanders decided to transfer Wasp from the Atlantic in order to augment their airpower. Wasp managed to successfully transit the Panama Canal and started conducting operations against Guadalcanal on August 7, 1942. Unfortunately, little more than a month later on September 15, the Japanese submarine I-19 put three torpedoes into Wasp, all of them hitting near the gas tanks and magazines. Needless to say, Wasp was "awarded" her very own Detonation medal soon afterward, sinking before she could contribute to the Pacific War effort in any significant way. Now you might be noticing that a lot of the entries coming in are aircraft carriers. If you're getting sick of it, don't worry, this is the last one for a while.

The First Battle of Guadalcanal
(Say goodbye Mrs. Sullivan)

The Atlanta-class anti-aircraft cruisers were designed specifically as a sort of "mini-flagship" for small-scale destroyer actions and later proved to be able to put up an impressive flak barrage but this came at the cost of general durability. When it came right down to it, they were little more than giant, floating crates of ammunition so when the Sullivan brothers asked to serve on the same ship, I somewhat question the wisdom of the official who put them in the Atlanta-class cruiser, Juneau. I don't know, maybe he didn't care enough. This leads us to the morning of November 13, 1942, in the aftermath of the First Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. The chaotic night action has seriously damaged numerous warships on both sides and Juneau was no exception. In fact, Juneau was quite possibly the most damaged ship the Americans still had in the vicinity, especially since, during the night action, Juneau had gotten into a point-blank gunnery duel with the Shiratsuyu-class destroyer, Yūdachi, and had only managed to fire about 30 rounds of 5-inch ammunition into the bat[POI] insane little ship before a full torpedo broadside from Yūdachi crippled Juneau with one hit. Mind you, judging from the engagement ranges, it is incredibly unlikely that any of the Yūdachi's torpedoes missed and it is instead far more likely that all but one of them didn't travel long enough to arm. (Holy mother of [POI]!) With that in mind, I don't want to see anyone spam the chat with "poi" anymore until they've pulled off a move that crazy but I digress. Juneau was holding up the retreating American ships that morning when the submarine, I-26, decided to take a few potshots at the Americans. While I-26's torpedoes missed their intended target one of them did manage to find its way into Juneau's powder magazines setting off a near-to-full load of 5-inch ammunition. While I wish I could say that this hit sunk Juneau, that would be a bit of a lie.

She was vaporized. The explosion sent up a massive column of water into the air and by the time it dissipated 30 seconds later, there was no visible trace of the Juneau left. Understandably, the men in charged believed that all of Juneau's crew perished in the explosion but in fact, 100 crew members had survived. Unfortunately, poor rescue efforts, which were not helped by the fact that the waters off Guadalcanal were still very much contested, made sure that only 7 of those crew members managed to make it back to shore alive. None of the Sullivan brothers were among the survivors. This devastating loss led to the US adopting the so-called "sole survivor policy" and the name of the five brothers were later honored by a Fletcher-class destroyer with a hull number of DD-537, USS The Sullivans.

Oh, You Thought We Were Done With Port-Side Accidents?

Well, that was a little depressing, let's get a little more light-hearted with the Nagato-class battleship, Mutsu's, Detonation medal. On the 8th of June, 1943, Mutsu was moored in Hashirajima when her #3 turret blew up causing the ship to split in half and kill 1,121 as the 1,474 crew including 140 aviators that were visiting the Mutsu for aircraft familiarisation. Actually, no, that's not light-hearted at all, that's incredibly dark. An investigation by Japanese High Command soon lay the blame on a disgruntled seaman who was accused of theft and was believed to be suicidal but modern historians are more apt to claim that the explosion was the result of an electrical fire. Unfortunately, with so few witnesses to what really happened and very little in terms of evidence, we may never know.

The Battle of the Philippine Sea
(Revenge of the Avgas Problems)

One of the biggest problems that the Imperial Japanese Navy suffered during the course of World War II is that they were always behind the US in terms of carrier doctrine. A major case in point would be the sinking of the aircraft carrier Taihō during the Battle of the Philippine Sea. Taihō was built as an armored carrier specifically designed to soak up damage and keep on fighting. When she was commissioned in March of 1944, she immediately became regarded as the most advanced carrier of Japan and the pride of the Combined Fleet. Unfortunately, she had been built without the lessons that the Americans learned from the Battle of the Coral Sea, specifically in regards to avgas problems. This led to serious problems at the Battle of the Philippine Sea when Taihō was attacked by the Gato-class submarine, USS Albacore. Albacore managed to put a single torpedo into Taihō flooding the bows, jamming the forward elevator, and most importantly, cracking the aviation gasoline fuel tanks. This was when it became immediately apparent to all involved that creating a completely enclosed aircraft hangar without any sort of ventilation may not have been such a good idea. Unfortunately, the senior Damage Control officer had very little experience and no tactical doctrine to work from so he made the problem much worse by ventilating the hangar as much as possible and spreading avgas fumes all over the bloody place. And then they blew up. This explosion heaved up the flight deck and blew out the sides of the hangar and proved to be too much for the mighty supercarrier. After most of her crew, as well as the Emperor's portrait, were safely evacuated, the Taihō blew up once again and sunk beneath the waves, thus awarding her a Detonation medal. The sinking of the Taihō sent a shock throughout Japanese High Command but by then, it was far too late to fix the problem. As an interesting coda, the captain of the Albacore became heavily discouraged for botching his all but perfect shot at the supercarrier and letting it get away. After a few months, American codebreakers became increasingly concerned because of their inability to locate the supercarrier and it wasn't until they interviewed a Japanese Prisoner of War that they found out what really happened.

Oh, and... I'm well aware that Shōkaku and Hiyō also suffered avgas detonations but I more attribute their sinkings to the fire damage caused by said explosions than by the actual explosions themselves.

The Battle off Samar
(Oxygen Torpedoes are deadly)

The Battle off Samar is often held up as one of the finest moments in US Naval history and one of the greatest embarrassments in Japanese Naval history. It is also one of many moments that highlight the vulnerability of Japanese oxygen torpedoes as two of their heavy cruisers were lost as a direct result of their oxygen torpedoes blowing up, the Mogami-class cruiser Suzuya and the Takao-class cruiser Chōkai. At the outset of the battle the Fletcher-class destroyer, USS Johnston managed to successfully torpedo the bow off of Suzuya's sister ship, Kumano, and Suzuya quickly moved in to assist, taking her out of the fight for the remainder of the battle. She was still targeted by two airstrikes. The first, made by 10 aircraft, destroyed Suzuya's port propellor. The second, made by 30 aircraft, also landed some near-misses but one of them blew up Suzuya's #1 torpedo tube mount. An hour later, Suzuya was abandoned and a good portion of her crew were rescued by both American and Japanese warships. While this may be a little embarassing for Suzuya and the men who sailed her, it is NOTHING compared to the sheer levels of bull**** involved in the sinking of the Chōkai. Just to put things in perspective:

Have you ever been detonated by the secondary batteries of a carrier?

Have you ever been detonated by the secondary batteries of a Bogue?

Have you ever had your Tier 8 premium IJN heavy cruiser get detonated by the secondary batteries of a nearly dead Bogue-class escort carrier that fail-divisioned to Tier 10?!

If your answer to the last question is "yes" than congratulations, you are one of the few people around here that understand the sheer horse**** suffered by the Chōkai. Enter the Casablanca-class escort carrier USS White Plains. Mind you, the Casablanca-class had half the secondary batteries of the Bogue but the gun arcs were better for what it was worth. White Plains had already been nearly deleted by the two forward batteries of the Yamato, a situation which I'm sure many people here will sympathize with, and in fact, would not be fully repaired before being thrown into the scrapyard. Of course, that didn't mean that the scrappy little escort carrier had lost all of her fight and one of the shots from her sole 5-inch peashooter was guided by the very hands of RNGesus himself to hit Chōkai's deck-mounted torpedo tubes causing such severe damage that Chōkai became a sitting duck for American air power. One 500-lb bomb and a scuttling from the Yugumo-class destroyer, Fujinami, later, the Chōkai slipped beneath the waves with the vast majority of her crew alive onboard Fujinami. Unfortunately, Fujinami was sunk with all hands before she could return to port, just to put salt in the wound.

TEN'NOUHEIKA BAN... zai?

Finally, I can not talk about detonation medals without including the aircraft carrier Unryū. In December of 1944, Unryū left Kure harbor in a vain attempt to reinforce the beleaguered Japanese garrison at Luzon. By this point in the war, the Japanese were so hard up for options that the Unryū's air wing consisted of little more than 30 Cherry Blossoms. This may sound a little uncharacteristic of the proud Imperial Japanese Navy until you realize that "Cherry Blossom" was the name they gave to a kamikaze cruise missile with a 2,500 lb warhead. Luckily for the Americans, these "Ohkas" never managed to reach their destination as Unryū was intercepted by the Balao-class submarine, USS Redfish. Redfish managed to put two torpedoes into Unryū. The first one stopped Unryū dead in the water making her an easy target for the second torpedo to hit her avgas tanks. Boy, I bet you're all seeing a pattern here but the avgas explosion "only" set some fires in the hangars. Did I mention that they were stacked to the brim with 30 examples of the second most powerful anti-shipping weapon ever built?! Yeah... it did not end well for poor Unryū. Her bow was blown off immediately and the order to abandon ship was very quickly given. Unfortunately for the crew, only 145 of the 1,238 officers, crewmen, and passengers survived to be rescued by Unryū's escorting destroyer, Shigure.

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With that out of the way let's move on to the next medal

DIE-HARD
Die-Hard.png.e912d95495e07c6b9b6a0d0f4098f3c1.png
(Ramming speed!)

This is one of the more exhilarating medals in World of Warships, ram your enemy to death and survive. It appeals to a certain base primal instinct, is nothing like what we imagine naval warfare as, and only happened once during the Age of Dreadnoughts... sort of. I'm not going to include all of the instances of this happening during Anti-Submarine Warfare since this was such a common way of taking out submarines that it doesn't really deserve a special award. I will, at least, include some sub-rammers that deserve special mention.

HMS Garry
(If one's great, two is fantastic)

HMS Garry was a River-class destroyer that served during WWI. On the 23rd of November, 1914, the German submarine U-18 tried to sneak into Scapa Flow when it was spotted and rammed by the trawler Dorothy Grey. Unbelievably, U-18 survived the attack and dived underwater but then it hit bottom and was forced back to the surface. It was then that Garry rammed U-18 a second and final time sinking her with only one casualty. This was not exactly special during the two world wars, ESPECIALLY not for the Royal Navy, but Garry holds the distinction of being the only ship to have fatally rammed a submarine twice. On the 19th of July, 1918, Garry attacked the German submarine UB-110 and damaged her with a depth-charge attack. UB-110 surfaced following the attack and was shortly rammed by Garry sealing the U-boat's fate.

HMS Dreadnought
(Nothing to fear)

While ramming a sub during either of the two world wars was nothing to cheer about, I have to include HMS Dreadnought's ramming because she was not a destroyer, she was a battleship. And not just any battleship, the battleship, the mother of all battleships and namesake of the Age of Dreadnoughts. But because the universe has a great sense of irony, her only significant action was to sink the submarine U-29. U-29 had surfaced just after firing a torpedo at the battleship HMS Neptune but Dreadnought chased down the U-boat and split it in half underneath her keel. Thus Dreadnought, a ship named for fearlessness, became the only battleship in history to deliberately sink an enemy submarine, the greatest source of fear for a battleship.

RMS Olympic
(A warship at heart)

Yes, that's right ladies and gentlemen, a passenger liner! And not just any passenger liner, the sister ship of the Titanic! In May of 1915, Olympic was requisitioned by the Royal Navy as a troopship and on 1917, she was fitted with 6-inch guns for self-defense. On the 12th of May, 1918, Olympic spotted the surfaced submarine, U-103. U-103 crash-dived to about 30 meters and turned to torpedo the Olympic but she was not able to launch the torpedoes before her pressure hull was critically damaged by Olympic's keel forcing the crew to blow the ballast tanks and abandon ship. The captain of the Olympic, Bertram Fox Hayes, was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for this action.

Vetehinen
(Sisu at sea)

Lastly, for the field of Anti-Submarine Warfare, we give special recognition to the Finnish submarine Vetehinen for being the only submarine to successfully ram an enemy warship. On the night of the 5th of November, 1942, Vetehinen was trolling the Sea of Aland for Soviet submarines when she managed to pick up a contact. After confirming it as hostile, Vetehinen launched a torpedo at the Soviet submarine ShCh-305 but in all likelihood, the torpedo didn't have enough distance to arm. Vetehinen then opened fire with her deck gun at ShCh-305 and did do some damage but a second torpedo also missed and ShCh-305 started to crash dive. Determined not to let the Soviet sub escape, the captain of Vetehinen ordered "ramming speed" and managed to finally sink ShCh-305 with the teeth on the bow of Vetehinen. Vetehinen only suffered a minor leak and managed to make it home for repairs.

Finally, we have the only instance of a successful ramming, and thus "Die-Hard" medal, in surface combat, though I imagine the recipient would be too humbly ashamed to accept the award:

Admiral Hipper
(Did he seriously just...?)

Early in the morning of April 8th, 1940, the invasion of Norway was well underway when the British destroyer HMS Glowworm was trolling Norwegian waters all on her lonesome when she came across the German destroyers, Z11 Bernd von Arnim and Z18 Hans Ludemann. Despite being outgunned, Glowworm engaged the Germans destroyers whereupon they called for help from the heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper. At first, Hipper had trouble distinguishing Glowworm from Bernd von Arnim but soon, Glowworm started taking some nasty hits so she started making smoke and attempting to disengage. Unfortunately for Glowworm, Hipper's guns were radar-directed so Glowworm was still in serious trouble. Glowworm soon emerged from the smoke only 800 m away from Hipper and fired a spread of five torpedoes at her. Hipper, however, was no fool and kept her bow pointed at Glowworm in order to reduce the torpedo threat, a tactic I'm sure many of you are familiar with. Glowworm then fell back into her smokescreen but Hipper took her brave pills and followed Glowworm anyways. It was then that Captain Gerard Roope ordered a hard turn to starboard and just after Hipper emerged from the smoke, Glowworm rammed the heavy cruiser causing a fair amount of damage to the Hipper but fatal damage to the Glowworm. It was then that Captain Hellmuth Heye of the Hipper started playing "Move [edited] Get Out The Way" by Ludacris, starting recording the encounter for Youtube, and yelled over the railing, "Zanks for ze 'Die-Hard' medal Dummk...

Wait... I'm getting "Real Life" and "Video Games" mixed up again. Actually, what happened was that after rescuing the remnants of the Glowworm's crew, he contacted the British Admiralty and recommended Captain Roope for the Victoria Cross. An award that the British Admiralty was happy to deliver.

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Our next medal to be awarded is:

DOUBLE STRIKE
5b56243533a3c_DoubleStrike.png.31e6323ff2aa724735075d0b0ebb895c.png
(Two-for-one Special!)

Yes, this time around it's that classic two-for-one special that gets everyone a warm and cozy feeling in their hearts, no matter what game they're playing. This time, we're leaving the amount of time between sinkings to be indeterminate and the rules for entry to be much more vague. First entry to the list is:

USS Enterprise
(The Grey Ghost of Midway)

Yes, that USS Enterprise, the most distinguished warship of the US Navy (whose service record is de-classified). During the Battle of Midway, Enterprise gave both Akagi and Kaga "Detonation" medals, which I mentioned earlier, with one dive-bomber airstrike earning her "Double Strike" award.

I-19
(The Sniper of the Seas)

This is another incident that has already shown up on the list, the torpedoing of USS Wasp. I-19 fired a full salvo of six torpedoes at Wasp from only 1 km away but only 3 of those torpedoes actually hit the Wasp. One of them passed ahead of the Wasp, traveled a full 10 km, and impacted the USS North Carolina sending her back to port for a spell. One of the two that passed behind the Wasp mortally wounded the Sims-class destroyer USS O'Brien causing her to sink three days later. I think it might become apparent just what liberties I'm taking with the criteria at this point.

Nagara
(Target Rich Environment in the Dark)

This is an award earned during the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, notable for being considerably less of a ClusterF'k than the First. During the battle, Nagara got off to a bad start when she became focused by several American destroyers and was set ablaze by the shellfire. However, at 2335 hours, Nagara gave back hard when she hit the Mahan-class destroyer USS Preston with two shells killing everyone in two of the engine compartments, setting off one of the torpedoes, and knocking over Preston's smokestack taking her searchlight out in the process. This left Preston a sitting duck for the rest of the Japanese Task Force. Soon afterwards, Nagara turned her attention towards Walke, which had just taken a torpedo hit from an unknown source. The shellfire that Nagara, combined with the destroyers Ayanami and Shikinami, poured into Walke proved to be too much and "Abandon Ship" was called within minutes. This medal is a bit dodgy since Nagara only got assists on the two American destroyers but given the natural chaos of battle and the fact that there isn't a f***ing computerized reward system in real life, I'm going to hand it out anyways.

USS McDermut
(Torpedoes f***ing everywhere)

McDermut was a Fletcher-class destroyer who's notable for her service during the Battle of the Surigao Strait where she got not just a double-kill but a triple-kill. This isn't really something to brag about though, since the Battle of the Surigao Strait was little more than an elaborate form of suicide on the part of the Japanese Task Force. Not only did the Americans have a massive advantage that night with some of the best search and fire-control radars in the entire world mounted on every bloody ship in their entire navy, but they also had a massive numbers advantage: 6 Battleships, 3 Heavy Cruisers, 5 Light Cruisers, 29 Destroyers, and 39 PT boats against only 2 Battleships, 1 Heavy Cruiser, and 4 Destroyers on the Japanese side. The American plan was fire every available torpedo at the Japanese battle column, which is already plenty of overkill in and of itself, then open up with Battleship and Cruiser gunfire just to upgrade it to 'MURICAN overkill. McDermut just happened to get lucky when her torpedoes hit the Asashio-class destroyers, Yamagumo, Michisio, and Asagumo. Yamagumo sank immediately while Michishio and Asagumo were left as sitting ducks for the rest of the American Task Force, which serves them right the overpowered little [CENSORED]s. Not really a great achievement but I have to include every medal earned.

USS Sealion
(You sank my Battleship!)

The dream of any submarine captain from that time was to sink a fully-armed battleship and save the rest of your navy from having to face its awe-inspiring guns. Only 3 battleships were lost to submarine attack throughout all of World War II and of those, only one was lost in the Pacific, the Japanese fast battleship Kongō to the USS Sealion. Kongō was traveling with the battleships Yamato and Nagato back to Japan from the embarrassing defeat at the Battle off Samar when the Balao-class submarine caught sight of her. At 0256 hours, Sealion fired a full spread of 6 torpedoes at Kongō and, 3 minutes later, fired another spread of 3 torpeodes at Nagato. Unfortunately, Sealion did not get a 2-for-1 battleship special since, at 0300 hours, Nagato was alerted to Sealion's presence by the sound of her first salvo hitting Kongō and since she was crewed by a bunch of highly-trained naval officers and not some idiot from the internet, she knew what her rudder was for and the importance of changing her course and speed. The Kagero-class destroyer Urakaze was not so lucky. The torpedo salvo aimed at Nagato went further on and one of them hit Urakaze dead amidships blowing up her powder magazines and sinking her within minutes. Oh yeah... Urakaze, you get a Detonation award for your "service" during the sinking of the Battleship Kongō.

Edited by Eboreg2
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Coming next down the line of medals is:

DREADNOUGHT
Dreadnought.png.29f9aa09bf9e040ca2d7dd7a9f194b99.png
(Will! You! Just! Die!!!)

The Dreadnought medal is awarded in-game to ships that have taken over 120% of their ship's damage in health-points and survived. Unsurprisingly, this medal is awarded mostly to battleships in-game because they're the one class of warship that's guaranteed to have a heal. I'll be awarding this medal a bit more loosely for real-life warships and, instead of using arbritary numerical values, I'm going to give a Dreadnought medal to any warship that took an absurd amount of damage and survived. Sorry Yorktown, you just didn't cut it.

SMS Seydlitz
(Showing the Tommies how it's done)

SMS Seydlitz was an Imperial German one-off Battlecruiser that saw extensive service, and punishment, during World War I. Her first nasty hit came during the Battle of Dogger Bank when a British shell penetrated her powder magazines setting a fire there. It was only through the damage-control efforts of one sailor that she was saved from being awarded a "Detonation" medal. The Germans quickly learned their lesson and tightened their safety protocols, which paid off during the Battle of Jutland. Anyone with even a passing knowledge of that battle, which to be fair, doesn't include a lot of people, will know that the action started with a gunnery duel between the opposing battlecruiser lines. Seydlitz received 21 battleship-caliber hits AND a torpedo for good measure. She barely made it out of that action afloat and narrowly evaded British patrols on a number of occasions. Flooding was so bad that her deck was all but flush with the water-line and her engine was so badly mauled that she could only barely move against the tide. While Seydlitz was more heavily-armored than her British counterparts, ultimately, it was superior German damage control that saved the ship.

USS Franklin
(What goes around...)

It may surprise you to find out that Seydlitz was the only battleship to have ever received the "Dreadnought" medal and the vast majority of recipients were, in fact, aircraft carriers. What may not surprise you is that every single other recipient of "Dreadnought" was American. While the Yorktown-class aircraft carriers were all quite durable in their own right, they had a nasty tendency of getting sunk just when they were about to win their Dreadnought medals and the one that didn't get sunk, USS Enterprise, never took enough damage in one battle to warrant a medal though she does get an honorary "Dreadnought" medal just for how much damage she took throughout the war. The Essex-class carrier USS Lexington also receives an honorary "Dreadnought" medal for causing the Japanese high command to swear that every time they sunk her, the US just made another one. However, the best case of an aircraft carrier surviving damage that should have sunk it is the Essex-class carrier USS Franklin. Franklin did not receive this medal as part of a specific battle but as a result of the air raids she was subjected to on March 19, 1945. Shortly before dawn, the crew of the Franklin were getting some much needed rest when a dive bomber hit Franklin with 2 250-kg bombs at a very inopportune time, when she was re-fueling and re-arming aircraft. This caused numerous gasoline fires and also detonated several anti-shipping weapons on board. Put quite simply, Franklin was facing the same damage that sunk the Akagi at the Battle of Midway. For six hours, her fire-fighting crews heroically contended with the blazing inferno that threatened to engulf their ship. After they finally managed to bring the flames under control, the heavy cruiser Pittsburgh towed Franklin all the way back to safety so that repairs could be done. USS Franklin, for this awe-inspiring feat of damage-control that would have proved too much for any lesser ship, you are a awarded with a Dreadnought medal of your very own.

And last but certainly not least

USS Laffey (DD-724)
(Hell from the skies)

And last in the list of "types of ship I expect to get a Dreadnought medal" is a destroyer but funny thing about real life is that it doesn't have to make any sense. On April 16, 1945, the Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, Laffey was attacked by no less than 50 kamikaze aircraft while serving in the designated "bomb me" zone Picket Station #1. Despite heroic efforts from the anti-aircraft crew and fighter escort from 4 FM-2 Wildcats and 12 F4U Corsairs, Laffey took a total of 4 bomb hits and 6 kamikaze crashes, which, combined with the amount of her own munitions that cooked off, comes to a grand total of anywhere between 64,433 to 92,223 lbs of ordnance. Just to put things in perspective, the battleship Yamato took 47,475 lbs of ordnance at Operation Ten-Go and Musashi took anywhere from 42,700-68,200 lbs of ordnance at the Battle of the Sibuyan Sea. Where they were sunk! Not only did Laffey survive that level of torture but she also managed to survive getting nuked and irradiated to hell during Operation Crossroads! I would love to visit her at Charleston, South Carolina... oh yeah, I should probably mention she's still afloat and has been preserved as a museum ship. As I was saying, I would love to give her not just one but two Dreadnought medals in person but since I have neither the money nor the time, I think I'll settle for awarding it here.

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Coming up next:

IT'S JUST A FLESH WOUND
5b5625bd6ee98_ItsJustaFleshWound.png.ccbf85b8055226c62af61f46228ba1f6.png
(From beyond the grave!)

There's something fairly satisfying about delivering a mortal wound to your enemy after you die. It's like saying, "Yeah, you thought you saw the last of me [edited]!" Unfortunately, ships generally took a lot longer to sink in real life than they do in video games so getting this medal was really difficult during the Age of Dreadnoughts. With that in mind, the first of only two ships to gain this medal was:

HMS Invincible
(Repensum Est Cunicula)

Let me tell you a story about a little German Battlecruiser named SMS Lützow. At the Battle of Jutland, Lützow took part in the opening part of the battle when the opposing battlecruiser columns of Britain and Germany exchanged fire. Lützow managed to get a lucky hit on HMS Invincible blowing up her powder magazine, splitting her in half, and killing all but six members of her crew. Lützow didn't get away from the battle scot-free, however. Before Lützow's devastating hit, Invincible managed to get eight nasty hits of her own into Lützow causing serious amounts of flooding. And, oh yes, battleships can cause flooding damage in real life try not to faint from shock. While retiring from the battle, the flooding in Lützow got so bad that her captain ordered abandon ship and got some torpedo boats to scuttle her. While Lützow took flooding damage from numerous sources, ultimately, it was Invincible's eight shells that proved to be the greatest source of damage and as such, I am awarding her with an "It's Just a Flesh Wound" medal.

U-405
(Avast Ye!)

From World War I to World War II, we have the anti submarine warfare action between the Clemson-class destroyer USS Borie and the Type VIIC U-boat, U-405 on November 1, 1943 and this one's a real tall tale. It starts way early in the morning well before dawn when Borie managed to pick up U-405 from about 8000 yards out. Borie closed the distance and depth-charged U-405 forcing her to the surface. From a range of only 400 yards, Borie then emptied every single one of its guns that it could spare into U-405 killing every single crewmember topside and blowing the deck gun clean off. After unleashing that kind of fury, Borie closed in and rammed the U-boat but it turned hard to port at the last minute bringing Borie's keel resting on top of U-405 with the two ships parallel to each other ready to start off a good old fashioned boarding action. The Borie's 4-inch guns could not depress down far enough to be of any use at this range so every available member of the crew grabbed whatever Tommy guns, rifles, pistols, and shotguns they could find on hand and just emptied their magazines into the U-boat's escape hatches. The U-boat's anti-aircraft guns would have been a problem if they were manned so the Borie's crew did absolutely whatever they could do to make sure they weren't up to and including using a flare gun, a throwing knife, and even braining some hapless German with a thrown 4-inch shell. U-405 eventually broke away and the 14 members of her crew that were still alive signalled their surrender after Borie sent another broadside their way. U-405 soon sank by the stern leaving her crew adrift to get picked up another nearby U-boat but the ordeal was not over for Borie. High waves had battered Borie while she was resting on top of U-405 and the flooding caused by the damage proved to be too much. Most of Borie's crew were safely evacuated to Borie's sister destroyers Goff and Barry the next night and the next morning, Borie was successfully scuttled from an aerial 500-lb bomb giving U-405 an "It's Just a Flesh Wound" medal.

Edited by Eboreg2
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KRAKEN UNLEASHED
5b56261b2d01a_KrakenUnleashed.png.634cf06980c292864457f09e9ef41a12.png
(Killing Spree!)

"Unleashing the Kraken" is quite possibly one of the highest honors one can get in-game for sinking 5 enemy warships in one battle. In fact, this is such a high honor that I could only find one real-life instance of a warship "Unleashing the Kraken" and that is none other than:

HMS Warspite herself!
(Grandma's ready to give you a paddlin')

Let me introduce you to the Second Battle of Narvik. The advancing German juggernaut was on the fast track to taking Norway and the Brits were bound and determined to take out the destroyer and submarine anchorage at Narvik. They had already send a destroyer flotilla to raid the anchorage in the First Battle of Narvik and failed to cause any significant damage so they decided to send more destroyers three days later... and HMS Warspite, an old but eternally stubborn veteran of the First World War. And when I say "stubborn", you'll have to understand my full meaning: She was like an old grandmother who, despite being beaten into oblivion by some of the most horrifying abuse thrown at her by mother nature, was more than willing to give her physicians a heart attack by getting out of her electric wheelchair, picking it up, and beating you to death with it. Even when she was headed for the scrapyard post-war, she still held on with that trademark British stiff upper lip. Warspite kicked things off by launching a Fairey Swordfish she was using for spotting and getting it to bomb and sink U-64. The battle wasn't even a contest, three German destroyers were sunk outright and another five scuttled themselves when they ran out of fuel, ammunition, and will to fight a mother*bleep*ing battleship. While Warspite may not have have directly sunk 5 ships, driving 5 to suicide with her mere presence counts as a set of sinkings in my book. Warspite, you stubborn old British bastard, congratulations on taking home the only "Kraken Unleashed" medal ever earned in history.

Edited by Eboreg2
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SOLO WARRIOR
5b562685d7e46_SoloWarrior.png.60f064a62ba3e3a85efca965682c39fe.png
(Bring it on!)

And now we have the best for last, standing alone against four enemy warships and still winning. Remember here that "combat-ineffective" is the same as "sunk" otherwise, we wouldn't have any contenders. As it happens, there is only one battle where a single warship stood alone against a significant force and won and that is none other than

The Second Battle of Guadalcanal featuring:
USS Washington

It should be noted that only 6 US warships took part in the Second Battle of Guadalcanal, the destroyers Walke, Benham, Preston, and Gwin and the battleships South Dakota and the star of this event, Washington. The Japanese, on the other hand, had 1 battleship, 2 heavy cruisers, 2 light cruisers, and 9 destroyers. Both sides spotted each other at 2300 hours and the US battleships took the first shots at 2317 hours. The destroyers of both sides engaged each other at 2322 hours and within 10 minutes, Walke and Preston were sunk. Benham also wasn't doing too well after getting her bow blown off by a torpedo and Gwin had her engine room knocked out forcing both to retreat, which renders them "combat-ineffective" in my book and probably yours as well. That left South Dakota and Washington but South Dakota soon suffered an electrical failure knocking out communications and fire control. South Dakota also got lit up by a Japanese searchlight making her the target of concentrated fire leaving her, in the words of Admiral Willis Lee, "deaf, [mute], blind, and impotent". Washington was now the only combat-effective warship standing between the Japanese and Henderson Field but never underestimate the value of teamwork: it gives the enemy something else to shoot at. Washington snuck to within 9,000 yds of the Japanese battleship Kirishima and while she was focused on South Dakota, Washington proceeded to use radar-directed gunfire to make Kirishima her new best friend. The heavy cruisers Takao and Atago tried to chase down Washington and take her out with torpedoes and gunfire but Washington simply led them away from South Dakota and Guadalcanal without taking any torpedo hits or running aground thanks to some mad torpedobeats. It was then that the Japanese admiral felt that there was no point staying around any longer and ordered his forces to withdraw. In defending Henderson Field single-handed, USS Washington managed to let the Cactus Air Force take out Japanese reinforcements and prevent them from overrunning the American foothold and thus gained herself one of only two "Solo Warrior" medals that were ever earned during the age of Dreadnoughts.

The other goes to USS Harder for the extensive skill and valor she showed during the Submarine Raid on Tawi-Tawi. She was the only submarine in that area and Tawi-Tawi wasn't even her mission objective but she still managed to force the Japanese Task Force meant for the Battle of the Philippine Sea to abandon the area early thanks to the threat from "multiple" submarines (lol).

Edited by Eboreg2
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20 minutes ago, Eboreg2 said:

With that out of the way let's move on to the next medal

DIE-HARD
Die-Hard.png.e912d95495e07c6b9b6a0d0f4098f3c1.png
(Ramming speed!)

This is one of the more exhilarating medals in World of Warships, ram your enemy to death and survive. It appeals to a certain base primal instinct, is nothing like what we imagine naval warfare as, and only happened once during the Age of Dreadnoughts... sort of. I'm not going to include all of the instances of this happening during Anti-Submarine Warfare since this was such a common way of taking out submarines that it doesn't really deserve a special award. I will, at least, include some sub-rammers that deserve special mention.

HMS Garry
(If one's great, two is fantastic)

HMS Garry was a River-class destroyer that served during WWI. On the 23rd of November, 1914, the German submarine U-18 tried to sneak into Scapa Flow when it was spotted and rammed by the trawler Dorothy Grey. Unbelievably, U-18 survived the attack and dived underwater but then it hit bottom and was forced back to the surface. It was then that Garry rammed U-18 a second and final time sinking her with only one casualty. This was not exactly special during the two world wars, ESPECIALLY not for the Royal Navy, but Garry holds the distinction of being the only ship to have fatally rammed a submarine twice. On the 19th of July, 1918, Garry attacked the German submarine UB-110 and damaged her with a depth-charge attack. UB-110 surfaced following the attack and was shortly rammed by Garry sealing the U-boat's fate.

HMS Dreadnought
(Nothing to fear)

While ramming a sub during either of the two world wars was nothing to cheer about, I have to include HMS Dreadnought's ramming because she was not a destroyer, she was a battleship. And not just any battleship, the battleship, the mother of all battleships and namesake of the Age of Dreadnoughts. But because the universe has a great sense of irony, her only significant action was to sink the submarine U-29. U-29 had surfaced just after firing a torpedo at the battleship HMS Neptune but Dreadnought chased down the U-boat and split it in half underneath her keel. Thus Dreadnought, a ship named for fearlessness, became the only battleship in history to deliberately sink an enemy submarine, the greatest source of fear for a battleship.

RMS Olympic
(A warship at heart)

Yes, that's right ladies and gentlemen, a passenger liner! And not just any passenger liner, the sister ship of the Titanic! In May of 1915, Olympic was requisitioned by the Royal Navy as a troopship and on 1917, she was fitted with 6-inch guns for self-defense. On the 12th of May, 1918, Olympic spotted the surfaced submarine, U-103. U-103 crash-dived to about 30 meters and turned to torpedo the Olympic but she was not able to launch the torpedoes before her pressure hull was critically damaged by Olympic's keel forcing the crew to blow the ballast tanks and abandon ship. The captain of the Olympic, Bertram Fox Hayes, was awarded the Distinguished Service Order for this action.

Vetehinen
(Sisu at sea)

Lastly, for the field of Anti-Submarine Warfare, we give special recognition to the Finnish submarine Vetehinen for being the only submarine to successfully ram an enemy warship. On the night of the 5th of November, 1942, Vetehinen was trolling the Sea of Aland for Soviet submarines when she managed to pick up a contact. After confirming it as hostile, Vetehinen launched a torpedo at the Soviet submarine ShCh-305 but in all likelihood, the torpedo didn't have enough distance to arm. Vetehinen then opened fire with her deck gun at ShCh-305 and did do some damage but a second torpedo also missed and ShCh-305 started to crash dive. Determined not to let the Soviet sub escape, the captain of Vetehinen ordered "ramming speed" and managed to finally sink ShCh-305 with the teeth on the bow of Vetehinen. Vetehinen only suffered a minor leak and managed to make it home for repairs.

Finally, we have the only instance of a successful ramming, and thus "Die-Hard" medal, in surface combat, though I imagine the recipient would be too humbly ashamed to accept the award:

Admiral Hipper
(Did he seriously just...?)

Early in the morning of April 8th, 1940, the invasion of Norway was well underway when the British destroyer HMS Glowworm was trolling Norwegian waters all on her lonesome when she came across the German destroyers, Z11 Bernd von Arnim and Z18 Hans Ludemann. Despite being outgunned, Glowworm engaged the Germans destroyers whereupon they called for help from the heavy cruiser Admiral Hipper. At first, Hipper had trouble distinguishing Glowworm from Bernd von Arnim but soon, Glowworm started taking some nasty hits so she started making smoke and attempting to disengage. Unfortunately for Glowworm, Hipper's guns were radar-directed so Glowworm was still in serious trouble. Glowworm soon emerged from the smoke only 800 m away from Hipper and fired a spread of five torpedoes at her. Hipper, however, was no fool and kept her bow pointed at Glowworm in order to reduce the torpedo threat, a tactic I'm sure many of you are familiar with. Glowworm then fell back into her smokescreen but Hipper took her brave pills and followed Glowworm anyways. It was then that Captain Gerard Roope ordered a hard turn to starboard and just after Hipper emerged from the smoke, Glowworm rammed the heavy cruiser causing a fair amount of damage to the Hipper but fatal damage to the Glowworm. It was then that Captain Hellmuth Heye of the Hipper started playing "Move [edited] Get Out The Way" by Ludacris, starting recording the encounter for Youtube, and yelled over the railing, "Zanks for ze 'Die-Hard' medal Dummk...

Wait... I'm getting "Real Life" and "Video Games" mixed up again. Actually, what happened was that after rescuing the remnants of the Glowworm's crew, he contacted the British Admiralty and recommended Captain Roope for the Victoria Cross. An award that the British Admiralty was happy to deliver.

For honorable mention I nominate the USS Verio a non combat ship that earned seven, I didn't stutter, battle stars.

 

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Solo Warrior means being the last ship afloat and winning against at least 4 opponents. Washington did win but other ships survived.

In wows the last man standing is often feeling a little beat up. This is one very hard to accomplish.

1 hour ago, Eboreg2 said:

SOLO WARRIOR
5b562685d7e46_SoloWarrior.png.60f064a62ba3e3a85efca965682c39fe.png
(Bring it on!)

And now we have the best for last, standing alone against five enemy warships and still winning. Remember here that "combat-ineffective" is the same as "sunk" otherwise, we wouldn't have any contenders. As it happens, there is only one battle where a single warship stood alone against a significant force and won and that is none other than

The Second Battle of Guadalcanal featuring:
USS Washington

It should be noted that only 6 US warships took part in the Second Battle of Guadalcanal, the destroyers Walke, Benham, Preston, and Gwin and the battleships South Dakota and the star of this event, Washington. The Japanese, on the other hand, had 1 battleship, 2 heavy cruisers, 2 light cruisers, and 9 destroyers. Both sides spotted each other at 2300 hours and the US battleships took the first shots at 2317 hours. The destroyers of both sides engaged each other at 2322 hours and within 10 minutes, Walke and Preston were sunk. Benham also wasn't doing too well after getting her bow blown off by a torpedo and Gwin had her engine room knocked out forcing both to retreat, which renders them "combat-ineffective" in my book and probably yours as well. That left South Dakota and Washington but South Dakota soon suffered an electrical failure knocking out communications and fire control. South Dakota also got lit up by a Japanese searchlight making her the target of concentrated fire leaving her, in the words of Admiral Willis Lee, "deaf, [mute], blind, and impotent". Washington was now the only combat-effective warship standing between the Japanese and Henderson Field but never underestimate the value of teamwork: it gives the enemy something else to shoot at. Washington snuck to within 9,000 yds of the Japanese battleship Kirishima and while she was focused on South Dakota, Washington proceeded to use radar-directed gunfire to make Kirishima her new best friend. The heavy cruisers Takao and Atago tried to chase down Washington and take her out with torpedoes and gunfire but Washington simply led them away from South Dakota and Guadalcanal without taking any torpedo hits or running aground thanks to some mad torpedobeats. It was then that the Japanese admiral felt that there was no point staying around any longer and ordered his forces to withdraw. In defending Henderson Field single-handed, USS Washington managed to let the Cactus Air Force take out Japanese reinforcements and prevent them from overrunning the American foothold and thus gained herself one of only two "Solo Warrior" medals that were ever earned during the age of Dreadnoughts.

The other goes to USS Harder for the extensive skill and valor she showed during the Submarine Raid on Tawi-Tawi. She was the only submarine in that area and Tawi-Tawi wasn't even her mission objective but she still managed to force the Japanese Task Force meant for the Battle of the Philippine Sea to abandon the area early thanks to the threat from "multiple" submarines (lol).

 

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56 minutes ago, Prothall said:

Solo Warrior means being the last ship afloat and winning against at least 4 opponents. Washington did win but other ships survived.

In wows the last man standing is often feeling a little beat up. This is one very hard to accomplish.

 

While the surviving US ships were leaving the battle area the Washington lead the Japanese on a merry chase so I would say that yes that was a solo warrior.

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8 minutes ago, BrushWolf said:

While the surviving US ships were leaving the battle area the Washington lead the Japanese on a merry chase so I would say that yes that was a solo warrior.

The Washington was accompanied by the South Dakota.

The SD was hurting, but she was there for some of the chase.

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2 minutes ago, Prothall said:

The Washington was accompanied by the South Dakota.

The SD was hurting, but she was there for some of the chase.

The Washington sent her away. The SD was like a player with connection problems as was AFK for the important parts of the match.

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I nominate the Lexington and all the other USN carriers involved in the Battle of the Philippine Sea (aka - The Great Marianas Turkey Shoot) for the Clear Sky Medal!  :cap_rambo:

Edited by DreadRaybo

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22 hours ago, Eboreg2 said:

After the Battle of Jutland ended in a draw, the Royal Navy decided to honor the memory of Admiral Hood by naming their most advanced battlecruiser after him. I dare say many of you might have already heard about this battlecruiser but if you haven't, trust me, you'll be hearing about her soon.

The second shell detonated in Hood's powder magazines at 0600 hours causing Hood to, like HMS Invincible before her, blow up, split in half, and take all but three of her crew to Davey Jones' Locker. I'm sure her namesake was proud of her for following in his footsteps. (lol)

 

 

To clarify, HMS Hood was not named after Adm. Horace Hood specifically. Hood as a namesake goes back to Horace Hood's ancestors, most prominently Admiral Samuel Hood, with two ships carrying the name beforehand.

HMS Hood (or at least the one everyone knows) was laid down on 31st May 1916, with the Battle of Jutland happening that very afternoon, evening and night. Subsequently, Hood was suspended after the losses at Jutland, and was redesigned (effectively becoming the without a doubt first fast BB), and eventually re-laid down on the 1st September 1916.

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23 hours ago, Eboreg2 said:

DETONATION
Detonation.png.729080f7845d9058c36d8fd40d81d839.png
(Thanks for showing up)

The Attack on Pearl Harbor

Now if you thought only Battlecruisers exploded, you'd be wrong. The second Detonation medal of WWII goes to the Pennsylvania-class battleship USS Arizona (BB-39) for her "service" during the Attack on Pearl Harbor. I won't spend too much time on what happened since you probably know that already and if you don't, what the hell is wrong with the public education system? The Japanese aircraft that attacked Arizona were dive bombers that were fitted with 16-inch shells jury-rigged to become 800 kg armor-piercing bombs. At 08:06 hours, one of these bombs managed to hit the powder magazine for the #2 turret causing a massive fireball to go 500 feet up into the air and killing 1,172 of the 1,512 crewmen on board. Most of the battleships sunk or damaged at Pearl Harbor were eventually recovered but Arizona was not one of those. You can still see her beneath the waves of Pearl Harbor today.

 

You forgot USS Shaw DD-373. She took a bomb hit in her forward magazine and detonated.

 

1024px-USS_SHAW_exploding_Pearl_Harbor_N

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USS Massachusetts during the Naval Battle of Casablanca might qualify for the High Caliber medal. She crippled and sank the incomplete Jean Bart and may have destroyed two merchant ships. Afterwards, she very likely scored hits and contributed to the destruction of Fougueux, Milan, and Primauguet. That's significant damage to four ships.

Edited by DeliciousFart

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 1:59 PM, Eboreg2 said:

Coming next down the line of medals is:

DREADNOUGHT
Dreadnought.png.29f9aa09bf9e040ca2d7dd7a9f194b99.png
(Will! You! Just! Die!!!)

The Dreadnought medal is awarded in-game to ships that have taken over 120% of their ship's damage in health-points and survived. Unsurprisingly, this medal is awarded mostly to battleships in-game because they're the one class of warship that's guaranteed to have a heal. I'll be awarding this medal a bit more loosely for real-life warships and, instead of using arbritary numerical values, I'm going to give a Dreadnought medal to any warship that took an absurd amount of damage and survived. Sorry Yorktown, you just didn't cut it.

SMS Seydlitz
(Showing the Tommies how it's done)

SMS Seydlitz was an Imperial German one-off Battlecruiser that saw extensive service, and punishment, during World War I. Her first nasty hit came during the Battle of Dogger Bank when a British shell penetrated her powder magazines setting a fire there. It was only through the damage-control efforts of one sailor that she was saved from being awarded a "Detonation" medal. The Germans quickly learned their lesson and tightened their safety protocols, which paid off during the Battle of Jutland. Anyone with even a passing knowledge of that battle, which to be fair, doesn't include a lot of people, will know that the action started with a gunnery duel between the opposing battlecruiser lines. Seydlitz received 21 battleship-caliber hits AND a torpedo for good measure. She barely made it out of that action afloat and narrowly evaded British patrols on a number of occasions. Flooding was so bad that her deck was all but flush with the water-line and her engine was so badly mauled that she could only barely move against the tide. While Seydlitz was more heavily-armored than her British counterparts, ultimately, it was superior German damage control that saved the ship.

USS Franklin
(What goes around...)

It may surprise you to find out that Seydlitz was the only battleship to have ever received the "Dreadnought" medal and the vast majority of recipients were, in fact, aircraft carriers. What may not surprise you is that every single other recipient of "Dreadnought" was American. While the Yorktown-class aircraft carriers were all quite durable in their own right, they had a nasty tendency of getting sunk just when they were about to win their Dreadnought medals and the one that didn't get sunk, USS Enterprise, never took enough damage in one battle to warrant a medal though she does get an honorary "Dreadnought" medal just for how much damage she took throughout the war. The Essex-class carrier USS Lexington also receives an honorary "Dreadnought" medal for causing the Japanese high command to swear that every time they sunk her, the US just made another one. However, the best case of an aircraft carrier surviving damage that should have sunk it is the Essex-class carrier USS Franklin. Franklin did not receive this medal as part of a specific battle but as a result of the air raids she was subjected to on March 19, 1945. Shortly before dawn, the crew of the Franklin were getting some much needed rest when a dive bomber hit Franklin with 2 250-kg bombs at a very inopportune time, when she was re-fueling and re-arming aircraft. This caused numerous gasoline fires and also detonated several anti-shipping weapons on board. Put quite simply, Franklin was facing the same damage that sunk the Akagi at the Battle of Midway. For six hours, her fire-fighting crews heroically contended with the blazing inferno that threatened to engulf their ship. After they finally managed to bring the flames under control, the heavy cruiser Pittsburgh towed Franklin all the way back to safety so that repairs could be done. USS Franklin, for this awe-inspiring feat of damage-control that would have proved too much for any lesser ship, you are a awarded with a Dreadnought medal of your very own.

And last but certainly not least

USS Laffey (DD-724)
(Hell from the skies)

And last in the list of "types of ship I expect to get a Dreadnought medal" is a destroyer but funny thing about real life is that it doesn't have to make any sense. On April 16, 1945, the Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, Laffey was attacked by no less than 50 kamikaze aircraft while serving in the designated "bomb me" zone Picket Station #1. Despite heroic efforts from the anti-aircraft crew and fighter escort from 4 FM-2 Wildcats and 12 F4U Corsairs, Laffey took a total of 4 bomb hits and 6 kamikaze crashes, which, combined with the amount of her own munitions that cooked off, comes to a grand total of anywhere between 64,433 to 92,223 lbs of ordnance. Just to put things in perspective, the battleship Yamato took 47,475 lbs of ordnance at Operation Ten-Go and Musashi took anywhere from 42,700-68,200 lbs of ordnance at the Battle of the Sibuyan Sea. Where they were sunk! Not only did Laffey survive that level of torture but she also managed to survive getting nuked and irradiated to hell during Operation Crossroads! I would love to visit her at Charleston, South Carolina... oh yeah, I should probably mention she's still afloat and has been preserved as a museum ship. As I was saying, I would love to give her not just one but two Dreadnought medals in person but since I have neither the money nor the time, I think I'll settle for awarding it here.

Very Good. I would argue that the USS Houston (CL-81) should be here as well. The Houston suffered extreme damage, following an air dropped torpedo hit at the Battle of Formosa on October 14, 1944 and a second torpedo hit to the ship while under tow to Ulithi did further damage. The Houston comprised CripDiv1 (Cripple Division 1) after the first torpedo hit, with USS Canberra (CA-70). Incredible Damage Control efforts saved the ship. The first torpedo hit below the armor belt and torpedo protection.

USS Houston CL81

Torpedo Damage Report

Off Formosa

14 and 16 October 1944

https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/nhhc/research/library/online-reading-room/title-list-alphabetically/w/war-damage-reports/uss-houston-cl81-war-damage-report-no-53.html

(Damage chart is attached.)

                                                           

Title: USS Houston (CL-81)
Description: Japanese aerial torpedo explodes against the ship's starboard quarter, during the afternoon of 16 October 1944. Houston had been torpedoed amidships on 14 October, while off Formosa, and was under tow by USS Pawnee (ATF-74) when enemy torpedo planes hit her again. USS Canberra (CA-70), also torpedoed off Formosa, is under tow in the distance.

0408133.jpg

NH 98825.jpeg

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On ‎7‎/‎23‎/‎2018 at 12:03 PM, Eboreg2 said:

KRAKEN UNLEASHED
5b56261b2d01a_KrakenUnleashed.png.634cf06980c292864457f09e9ef41a12.png
(Killing Spree!)

Another awardee of this has to be the USS England (DE 635)

USSEngland.jpg

This non-descript escort destroyer sank six (6) Japanese submarines in a period of 12 days.  Between 13 May 1944 and 27 May 1944, the England sank the I-16, RO-104, RO-105, RO-108, and RO-116.  That's a record that still stands today.

 

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On 7/23/2018 at 11:56 AM, Eboreg2 said:

Our next medal to be awarded is:

DOUBLE STRIKE
5b56243533a3c_DoubleStrike.png.31e6323ff2aa724735075d0b0ebb895c.png
(Two-for-one Special!)

Yes, this time around it's that classic two-for-one special that gets everyone a warm and cozy feeling in their hearts, no matter what game they're playing. This time, we're leaving the amount of time between sinkings to be indeterminate and the rules for entry to be much more vague. First entry to the list is:

USS Enterprise
(The Grey Ghost of Midway)

Yes, that USS Enterprise, the most distinguished warship of the US Navy (whose service record is de-classified). During the Battle of Midway, Enterprise gave both Akagi and Kaga "Detonation" medals, which I mentioned earlier, with one dive-bomber airstrike earning her "Double Strike" award.

I-19
(The Sniper of the Seas)

This is another incident that has already shown up on the list, the torpedoing of USS Wasp. I-19 fired a full salvo of six torpedoes at Wasp from only 1 km away but only 3 of those torpedoes actually hit the Wasp. One of them passed ahead of the Wasp, traveled a full 10 km, and impacted the USS North Carolina sending her back to port for a spell. One of the two that passed behind the Wasp mortally wounded the Sims-class destroyer USS O'Brien causing her to sink three days later. I think it might become apparent just what liberties I'm taking with the criteria at this point.

Nagara
(Target Rich Environment in the Dark)

This is an award earned during the Second Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, notable for being considerably less of a ClusterF'k than the First. During the battle, Nagara got off to a bad start when she became focused by several American destroyers and was set ablaze by the shellfire. However, at 2335 hours, Nagara gave back hard when she hit the Mahan-class destroyer USS Preston with two shells killing everyone in two of the engine compartments, setting off one of the torpedoes, and knocking over Preston's smokestack taking her searchlight out in the process. This left Preston a sitting duck for the rest of the Japanese Task Force. Soon afterwards, Nagara turned her attention towards Walke, which had just taken a torpedo hit from an unknown source. The shellfire that Nagara, combined with the destroyers Ayanami and Shikinami, poured into Walke proved to be too much and "Abandon Ship" was called within minutes. This medal is a bit dodgy since Nagara only got assists on the two American destroyers but given the natural chaos of battle and the fact that there isn't a f***ing computerized reward system in real life, I'm going to hand it out anyways.

USS McDermut
(Torpedoes f***ing everywhere)

McDermut was a Fletcher-class destroyer who's notable for her service during the Battle of the Surigao Strait where she got not just a double-kill but a triple-kill. This isn't really something to brag about though, since the Battle of the Surigao Strait was little more than an elaborate form of suicide on the part of the Japanese Task Force. Not only did the Americans have a massive advantage that night with some of the best search and fire-control radars in the entire world mounted on every bloody ship in their entire navy, but they also had a massive numbers advantage: 6 Battleships, 3 Heavy Cruisers, 5 Light Cruisers, 29 Destroyers, and 39 PT boats against only 2 Battleships, 1 Heavy Cruiser, and 4 Destroyers on the Japanese side. The American plan was fire every available torpedo at the Japanese battle column, which is already plenty of overkill in and of itself, then open up with Battleship and Cruiser gunfire just to upgrade it to 'MURICAN overkill. McDermut just happened to get lucky when her torpedoes hit the Asashio-class destroyers, Yamagumo, Michisio, and Asagumo. Yamagumo sank immediately while Michishio and Asagumo were left as sitting ducks for the rest of the American Task Force, which serves them right the overpowered little [CENSORED]s. Not really a great achievement but I have to include every medal earned.

USS Sealion
(You sank my Battleship!)

The dream of any submarine captain from that time was to sink a fully-armed battleship and save the rest of your navy from having to face its awe-inspiring guns. Only 3 battleships were lost to submarine attack throughout all of World War II and of those, only one was lost in the Pacific, the Japanese fast battleship Kongō to the USS Sealion. Kongō was traveling with the battleships Yamato and Nagato back to Japan from the embarrassing defeat at the Battle off Samar when the Balao-class submarine caught sight of her. At 0256 hours, Sealion fired a full spread of 6 torpedoes at Kongō and, 3 minutes later, fired another spread of 3 torpeodes at Nagato. Unfortunately, Sealion did not get a 2-for-1 battleship special since, at 0300 hours, Nagato was alerted to Sealion's presence by the sound of her first salvo hitting Kongō and since she was crewed by a bunch of highly-trained naval officers and not some idiot from the internet, she knew what her rudder was for and the importance of changing her course and speed. The Kagero-class destroyer Urakaze was not so lucky. The torpedo salvo aimed at Nagato went further on and one of them hit Urakaze dead amidships blowing up her powder magazines and sinking her within minutes. Oh yeah... Urakaze, you get a Detonation award for your "service" during the sinking of the Battleship Kongō.

I recall Japanese submarine I-168 torpedoing the USS Yorktown and hitting one of her escorts, a Sims-Class Destroyer, USS Hammann.  I don't know who gets the credit for sinking the USS Yorktown since she was badly damaged by multiple attacks and by USS Hammann exploding, but I-168 scored 2 torpedo hits on her which seemed to finish off the legendary Yorktown, even if she stubbornly refused to sink for many hours, she was at that point a lost cause.

 

On 7/23/2018 at 11:49 AM, Eboreg2 said:

DETONATION
Detonation.png.729080f7845d9058c36d8fd40d81d839.png
(Thanks for showing up)

During the tragedy that was the Attack on Mers-el-Kébir, the French Battleship Bretagne was hit by four 15-inch (380 mm) projectiles from HMS Hood, HMS Resolution, and HMS Valiant (no ship is individually credited). The two first shells struck simultaneously in the third British salvo. The first hit the ship below the waterline under turret IV, igniting some 340 mm shells and triggering a massive explosion. The deflagration blew up bulkheads and watertight doors and set all the stern ablaze, killing about 350 sailors. In the meantime, a hole on the starboard side of the ship allowed water (estimated at a rate of 300 tons per minute) to pour in. This flooding prevented the complete destruction of the ship: it limited the fire around the aft 340 mm magazines, which were now open to the air.

The second shell struck above the waterline, in the aft engine room, killing all the sailors inside and damaged the internal communication system of the ship.

Seven minutes later, two other high-calibre shells struck the Bretagne at the same time. The first detonated at the base of the tripod mast, igniting some ready-to-use anti-aircraft projectiles which were stored in lockers next to the anti-aircraft mounts. The second went through the central 138 mm casement, exploding deep inside the ship. A fire started, with leaking oil burning next to the ship. In about thirty seconds, the ship rolled and exploded.  The sinking killed 977 of her crew.

Operation-Catapult1.jpg

bombardment-location-merselkebir-picture

Edited by Sventex

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