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Seniorious

Hold on a second....Graf Scharnhorst?

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So while admiring the Graf Spee and fantasizing about her going 50% sometime this month, I happened to notice something. Her turret models have always changed depending on what Scharnhorst camoflauge I use from ZFireWyvern or Edelweisse, which bugs me a bit, but this is plain weird. 
n6baXdA.png
Its' difficult to read because my computer is potato, but that says KMS Scharnhorst? 
I can't even find that badge on the Scharnhorst herself, but Graf Spee has it?
What? 
Moreover, why are they sharing turret models when they have actually have different guns? 
Scharnhorst's barrel is longer, and fires a heavier shell too. Yet why is there such an Alpha gap? I had heard that Scharnhorst got her alpha nerfed early on, but I imagined it was by 300-500HP or so. 
Not the difference of 7,600 on Scharn, when Spee can dump 8,400. That's incredible. 
 

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Graf Spee's turrets have the wappen of SMS Scharnhorst (forward turret) and SMS Gneisenau (aft turret) on them as they did in real life. SMS Scharnhorst and Gneisenau were commanded by Admiral Maximilian von Spee at the Battle of the Falkland Islands in 1914 which resulted in the sinking of SMS Scharnhorst and Gneisenau as well as the loss of von Spee himself who was aboard Scharnhorst when she sank.

AXliK.jpg

Edited by zFireWyvern

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4 minutes ago, zFireWyvern said:

Graf Spee's turrets have the wappen of SMS Scharnhorst (forward turret) and SMS Gneisenau (aft turret) on them as they did in real life. SMS Scharnhorst and Gneisenau were commanded by Admiral Maximilian von Spee at the Battle of the Falkland Islands in 1914 which resulted in the sinking of SMS Scharnhorst and Gneisenau as well as the loss of von Spee himself who was aboard Scharnhorst when she sank.

 

Ah, that also explains why the coat of arms is different too. I didn't know there were SMS Scharn and Gneise, I haven't looked too deeply into their navy of the time. As always, the Germans and their interesting naming procedures. 
Interesting to know, though I'm still disappointed about the other stuff. 
Also, do you happen to know why on earth the Deutschland class were even named that? it seems kind of ironic to other countries that a panzerschiff/CA would be named after the homeland. It sounds like naming the Alaska-class CBs the 'United States-class' with the lead ship named the USS United States, which in itself....I don't need to explain how redundant that would be. Just some curiosity from someone not too well educated in this subject. 

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3 minutes ago, Seniorious said:

Also, do you happen to know why on earth the Deutschland class were even named that? it seems kind of ironic to other countries that a panzerschiff/CA would be named after the homeland. It sounds like naming the Alaska-class CBs the 'United States-class' with the lead ship named the USS United States, which in itself....I don't need to explain how redundant that would be. Just some curiosity from someone not too well educated in this subject. 

No idea.

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32 minutes ago, Seniorious said:

it seems kind of ironic to other countries that a panzerschiff/CA would be named after the homeland. It sounds like naming the Alaska-class CBs the 'United States-class' with the lead ship named the USS United States, which in itself....I don't need to explain how redundant that would be. Just some curiosity from someone not too well educated in this subject. 

First US frigate launched under the 1794 naval act:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_United_States_(1797)

 

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50 minutes ago, Seniorious said:

Also, do you happen to know why on earth the Deutschland class were even named that? it seems kind of ironic to other countries that a panzerschiff/CA would be named after the homeland. It sounds like naming the Alaska-class CBs the 'United States-class' with the lead ship named the USS United States, which in itself....I don't need to explain how redundant that would be. Just some curiosity from someone not too well educated in this subject. 

Probably because they were the first large ships Germany was allowed to build after some of the Treaty of Versailles limitations had lapsed. The funny thing is that Hitler ended up forcing the renaming of Deutschland herself to Lutzow during the war, as he wanted to get rid of the opportunity for propaganda if she sank.

Edited by andarragh21

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11 minutes ago, MannyD_of_The_Sea said:

First US frigate launched under the 1794 naval act:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_United_States_(1797)

 

In the 1700's, where if you had guns period you were a big dog.....she was laid down as a capital ship, so it's normal. 
In the 1900's pre-dreadnought through super dreadnought era, there's a far bigger gap which is where it come in play with the naming conventions. Deutschland isn't quite capital, nor is Alaska, so that's where my statement comes from.

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On 7/16/2018 at 4:14 AM, Seniorious said:


Also, do you happen to know why on earth the Deutschland class were even named that? it seems kind of ironic to other countries that a panzerschiff/CA would be named after the homeland. It sounds like naming the Alaska-class CBs the 'United States-class' with the lead ship named the USS United States, which in itself....I don't need to explain how redundant that would be. Just some curiosity from someone not too well educated in this subject. 

Just to take a shake at it...I would assume it had a lot to do with German pride. At the time of Versailles there was a lot of humiliation. Germany was essentially disarmed and her military was essentially a National Guard. Germany wasn't permitted warships larger than cruisers. The Deutschlands were likely a way to foster pride of place and a sign that Germany was on the way back to prominence?

It is important to note that Deutschland was renamed Lutzow as it was felt that having a ship named Deutschland sunk would be a huge blow to national pride.... 

 

Edited by BBsquid

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