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Grand_Viceroy_Zhou_Ziyu

Anyone interested in deep reefs and the deep sea?

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Growing up I've always been fascinated by the ocean. Before my interest in fighting vessels, I was (and I still am) interested in the ocean itself AKA marine life. Watching Finding Nemo made me want to have my own saltwater aquarium. I begged my dad to take me to the pet store where they sold some tropical marine fish, and despite his warnings that I wouldn't know how to keep it alive I went ahead and bought a False Percula Clownfish (Nemo and Marlin look like True Percula Clownfish). I had absolutely no idea how to set up a marine tank properly, so I bought a tiny tank, filled it with some salt water, put the fish in, and managed to keep it alive for ten days. That was my first (and to date, only) attempt at keeping marine fish.

   It's a lot harder than keeping your average freshwater species for sure, and I wasn't even good at keeping freshwater fish. However, my interest in marine life and saltwater fish continues to this day, and when I find the place I'd like to live in for the rest of my days, I'll surely give another go at maintaining a saltwater tank if possible. Sure we're all familiar with species of marine fish like damselfish, the blue and green chromis, the clownfish, the flame angelfish, yellow tang, moorish idol etc. However, a "subset" of my interest is in rare species of marine from deeper waters. What do you mean? Aren't all coral reefs bathed in shallow, sunlit waters?

    Sure that's what many people may believe, but your average scuba diver with normal equipment usually doesn't go deeper than 30-35 meters when exploring a reef, because below that it takes a lot more expertise due to the increased risk of getting the bends, or even nitrogen narcosis. A significant portion of tropical reefs lies below 100-120 feet, usually going down to about 450-500 feet. It can be a bit of a frightening experience exploring these deep reefs, because although the water's a lot more calm and clear, it's quite dark and I've heard even a dive down to 350-400 feet at 11 AM on a sunny day feels like a dive at dusk or even a night dive. If you see scuba divers at these depths, they usually carry flashlights and use rebreathers instead of conventional scuba equipment.

   It's really mysterious down at these deep reefs because every dive researchers find species they haven't seen, and haven't named. For example, a couple of years ago they discovered a type of burrowing fish that creates mounds for itself (likely for shelter) 300 feet down off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Some beautiful species of deepwater angelfish have been discovered in the South Pacific off Nauru and the Solomon Islands. The peppermint angelfish is found 350-450 feet down in the Solomon Islands I believe, and it was only a couple of years ago that two specimens were finally captured and taken to Hawaii for display. A couple have made it to the aquarium trade, mostly to Japan (many of these rare deepwater species from the Asia-Pacific, if they ever make it to the aquarium trade, are shipped to Japan). One was sold for a whopping 33,000 dollars. Another species from Nauru is the yellow narcosis angelfish. As you can tell from its name, it is a reference to how elusive it is due to it living at 350-460 feet. Sometimes the neptune grouper makes it to the aquarium trade in places like Japan and Singapore. It lives down to 800 feet, and it's quite hard to acclimatize to the aquarium unless it was caught as a juvenile.

   These deep reefs are of great fascination to me because they're beyond the reach of amateur divers, but submarines / submersibles tend to go past them in their descent to greater depths. Then there's the deep sea. It's called the true last frontier, space isn't the last frontier anymore. It was interesting how last year they found a species of snailfish living at a record depth of 8,162 meters in the Marianas Trench off Guam I believe. It's called the ethereal snailfish, a fitting name in my opinion. There's a limit to how deep fish can live, and I think that limit's about 8,200 meters because anything deeper than that would be insufficient to sustain the anatomy of most fish. 8,162 meters is just 38 meters short of this perhaps arbitrary limit. However, I heard that a cusk eel was discovered at 8,800 meters in the Puerto Rico Trench, but it's never been given a name and I've not seen what it looks like.

   I'd love to dive someday, though I doubt I have the lung capacity to handle it for long. It would be cool exploring the depths on a research submersible, but the chilling possibility of a mechanical / electric failure, or the pressurized windows somehow breaking at such crushing depths, makes me shudder. I'd like to see a sea mount, a hot vent, cold seep, everything. I'd also like to go to the South Pacific and explore a few shipwrecks of the vessels that are represented here either by name or by class, as long as they're in shallow water. The wreck of the Atlanta, one of my favorite ships and best performing ships so far, lays in 127 meters of water. That's too deep. Way too deep for me.

Edited by Grand_Viceroy_Zhou_Ziyu
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Of course! Not to mention the fact that we have hardly explored the ocean. But the potential for many more uncharted life forms to be discovered is extraordinary! For me personally the deep water organisms have always been so increditably fascinating Such an environment they live in and yet life persists. Kinda gives hope to the space question as well. 

 

We always ramble on about the great mysteries of space. Life on other planets and the outlandish technology that will not doubt come with it. Definitely exciting, don't get me wrong, I'm a big Sci-fi guy myself. But something so mysterious and right on our doorstep unexplored is something I want to learn ore about. Being so much more accessible then faraway planets. Now if only I could survive school and realize this dream lul. 

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Incendiary_Tanker said:

Of course! Not to mention the fact that we have hardly explored the ocean. But the potential for many more uncharted life forms to be discovered is extraordinary! For me personally the deep water organisms have always been so increditably fascinating Such an environment they live in and yet life persists. Kinda gives hope to the space question as well. 

 

We always ramble on about the great mysteries of space. Life on other planets and the outlandish technology that will not doubt come with it. Definitely exciting, don't get me wrong, I'm a big Sci-fi guy myself. But something so mysterious and right on our doorstep unexplored is something I want to learn ore about. Being so much more accessible then faraway planets. Now if only I could survive school and realize this dream lul. 

 

 

Lul back when I was a kid I wanted to become a marine biologist. My understanding of a MB's life was as good as someone thinking Indiana Jones and Lara Croft represent real archaeologists. I had absolutely no idea how much math and other stuff that's involved in marine biology, and I happen to suck at these exact things.

    The giant squid apparently isn't the largest species of squid, it's the colossal squid found in the South Atlantic and sub-Antarctic waters. Dead specimens have been captured, but no one has seen a live one. Imagine the Antarctic and Arctic deep sea, it must be FREEZING. In tropical seas, in the deeper part of the twilight zone and down to the dark / aphotic zone, I think the water's on average just a couple of degrees above zero, and then it plunges below zero. I'd be very curious to see what other life forms they find in the ocean trenches. I'd be scared, but fascinated if they find that Megalodon's alive after all lol but that's pretty much impossible because nothing at those depths can sustain Megalodon's appetite.

   The deepest living species of octopus is called the Dumbo Octopus. You can look it up on Google. It got its name due to its flappy 'ears' that resemble Dumbo.

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Just now, Grand_Viceroy_Zhou_Ziyu said:

Lul back when I was a kid I wanted to become a marine biologist. My understanding of a MB's life was as good as someone thinking Indiana Jones and Lara Croft represent real archaeologists. I had absolutely no idea how much math and other stuff that's involved in marine biology, and I happen to suck at these exact things.

    The giant squid apparently isn't the largest species of squid, it's the colossal squid found in the South Atlantic and sub-Antarctic waters. Dead specimens have been captured, but no one has seen a live one. Imagine the Antarctic and Arctic deep sea, it must be FREEZING. In tropical seas, in the deeper part of the twilight zone and down to the dark / aphotic zone, I think the water's on average just a couple of degrees above zero, and then it plunges below zero. I'd be very curious to see what other life forms they find in the ocean trenches. I'd be scared, but fascinated if they find that Megalodon's alive after all lol but that's pretty much impossible because nothing at those depths can sustain Megalodon's appetite.

   The deepest living species of octopus is called the Dumbo Octopus. You can look it up on Google. It got its name due to its flappy 'ears' that resemble Dumbo.

 

Lol, Funny enough. I'm a bigger fan of Human biology and yet I scored the best when talking about plant or animal biology.  What is my life. :fish_palm:  

And squids? Eh, I know about them. Don't really find them all that interesting. Now the Blob fish however! :cap_haloween:

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You guys should play Subnautica, its definitely right up your alley in regards to this.

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I used to do a lot of diving when I lived out on the West Coast. Of course, as a recreational diver (Master Diver cert), I didn't venture below 40 meters because you don't have much time below that depth before you have to stop to decompress, and that's a whole 'nother ball of wax where diving is concerned.

In case you missed them, here are some of my pictures. They were taken back in the 35 mm era.

 

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40 meters is quite good for an amateur diver. I went diving at the age of 10 off Hainan at a dive site called Wuzhizhou. I made it to 16.5 meters until I felt like my ears were going to explode. I touched some fire coral and it actually gave me a stinging, burning feeling on my thumbs.

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I have always been fascinated with diving too. I'm not sure I have the guts or lung capacity to try it though. It's just amazing to me how deep the ocean truly is and how much we don't know about it. Truly fascinating. 

Also, amazing pictures @Snargfargle! You sure do have some amazing adventures. :)

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I've always been more interested in underwater than space but it is also much scarier to me. It's so dark, and so many things live in the deeps that have yet to discover. It's equal measures terrifying and fascinating 

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57 minutes ago, WolfofWarship said:

I've always been more interested in underwater than space but it is also much scarier to me. It's so dark, and so many things live in the deeps that have yet to discover. It's equal measures terrifying and fascinating 

I feel the same way. Sunlight penetrates only the first 200 meters or so, but from the images and video footage of deep reef dives down to 400 feet it's already quite dark.

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15 hours ago, Grand_Viceroy_Zhou_Ziyu said:

I feel the same way. Sunlight penetrates only the first 200 meters or so, but from the images and video footage of deep reef dives down to 400 feet it's already quite dark.

Under the strobe light, many fish and other sea creatures have bright colors, oftentimes red. However, under natural light, reds appear black below a certain depth, which varies depending on the clarity of the water. Why red? My speculation is that, biologically, red must be metabolically easier to produce than black.

Edited by Snargfargle
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I recommend a game called Subnautica. If you love exploring/deep water stuff that is the game for you

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