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icyplanetnhc

Does spotter aircraft change the “aiming plane” from vertical to horizontal?

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I’ve been experimenting with the spotter aircraft in training room and battles to improve. Through my observations, I noticed several interesting changes to the aiming system when using it.

Most experienced players would probably know this, but when you are not “locked on” to any targets, your aiming reticle shows your point of impact, or where your salvo would land around, on the horizontal plane. In other words, your “aiming plane” is a 2D horizontal plane that’s coincident with sea as depicted in game. However, when you have “locked on” to a target when aiming, “aiming plane” becomes a vertical plane that’s perpendicular to the camera and coincident with the target ship. Whether that’s the center, or the point of the ship closest to you, is something I’m not certain about, though I’m inclined to believe that it’s the former. Furthermore, because of this change of “aiming plane”, it distorts your range perception. In other words, your salvo will no longer be centered around where your reticle lands on the horizontal plane coincident with sea level. This is most easily seen when you have a target locked on, but you try to shoot at another ship that’s closer or further away; your aim will be quite a bit off from where you think it is. Experienced player will know what I’m referring to.

However, when using the spotter aircraft and using it at a range where the camera changes angle, I’m not entirely sure what the “aiming plane” is. From my observation, when using the spotter aircraft, you have to aim rather low, possibly due to how the waterline of the ship appears closer due to change in perspective. Logically, I think the “aiming plane” returns to the horizontal when using the spotter aircraft even when locked on, but I can’t say for sure. Furthermore, at a certain range band (around 8-10 km), your perspective when using the spotter aircraft changes from default to high elevation, but how does the “aiming plane” transition between the two?

These are just some thoughts and questions that require more testing. Does anyone else with spotter aircraft experience have similar observations?

EDIT: Added a video to illustrate these points.

 

Edited by icyplanetnhc

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Spotter plane gives you a Birdseye view. You are basically the observer, observing the observed and relaying
the firing coordinates back to the ship. Takes practice, but is effective , once you work it out. 

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What you are talking about is actually the game trying to assist you in aiming. Sort of like it drags your shot closer to the ship, but it only does this 'vertically' as you put it, even though it's not up and down, but near and far that is affected. 

 

Without spotter plane, when you look at a ship against the horizon you can imagine a 2d target box in a 3D world. Let's say you want to aim at its waterline, when you adjust for lead you are still aiming at the ship in the 3D space because it's physical path will line up into your salvo. However if you wanted to shoot at the superstructure of that ship and adjusted for lead, now your reticle would look like you're aiming way off in the distance. You are now aiming at the ships 2d space, and this is why you will still hit the superstructure of the ship even though your reticle was actually pointing 5km behind the ship. 

 

With spotter, even though you're aiming down at the ship, this effect still takes place. I'm sure a lot of players in the game understand this intuitively without actually realizing it or having it cross their mind. It's not something that would really be thought about. 

Edited by Pulicat

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this type of reticle mod is good for spotter plane use. however it is NOT dynamic, meaning you will have to adjust lead according to ship size/speed depending on how far you are zoomed.

image.thumb.png.a3326ee69b021fbee9eeaf7e25b1d924.png

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I use spotter plane a lot, and at this point i don't think I'm much use anymore in helping someone use it.  Mainly because I think I've internalized the offset to the point I no longer cognitively know what I'm changing.  But there is one exception.  So  here goes.

There is one thing, and OP has somewhat hit on it.  As the zoom range decreases, the spotter angle decreases.  Or, maybe it's the same angle, and the projection changes.  Whatever.  The bottom line is the change in range leads to a change in the aim point on the 2D projection (the screen).  This is internalized over time, so it's not even noticed.  Most of the time.

However, I do notice that as the angle converges between spotter plane view and normal, there is a transition range that causes issues.   This is the range where the projection on the screen (from spotter view) appears the same as the view (without the spotter).  But the angle is still there.  It's just not noticeable.  It's in this transition view where rounds land long when you think they are on target.  That is, a good aim without the spotter becomes long with the spotter.  It's not a lot...and it converges to zero as the range falls.  But it does happen.

Usually, I don't remember this in the moment.  What will happen is I'll fire at a ship that (in the moment) is at a range that gives it the appearance as the normal 2D plane.  So my cognitive functions are firing based on the 2D plane.  The rounds land long, and that triggers my neurons that scream "Oh crap, I'm in spotter view".  It's in these instances, I have to aim a little low...just as OP noted in his first post.   

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3 hours ago, Pulicat said:

What you are talking about is actually the game trying to assist you in aiming. Sort of like it drags your shot closer to the ship, but it only does this 'vertically' as you put it, even though it's not up and down, but near and far that is affected. 

 

Without spotter plane, when you look at a ship against the horizon you can imagine a 2d target box in a 3D world. Let's say you want to aim at its waterline, when you adjust for lead you are still aiming at the ship in the 3D space because it's physical path will line up into your salvo. However if you wanted to shoot at the superstructure of that ship and adjusted for lead, now your reticle would look like you're aiming way off in the distance. You are now aiming at the ships 2d space, and this is why you will still hit the superstructure of the ship even though your reticle was actually pointing 5km behind the ship. 

 

With spotter, even though you're aiming down at the ship, this effect still takes place. I'm sure a lot of players in the game understand this intuitively without actually realizing it or having it cross their mind. It's not something that would really be thought about. 

Yes, aiming in this game is selecting a point of impact in a 2D plane while the game occurs in 3D space. When not "locked on", this 2D plane is horizontal and coincides with the waterline. However, when "locked on" and without spotter plane, I'm almost certain that the 2D plane changes to vertical and perpendicular to the camera. The reason I strongly suspect that this is the case is that, for example, when you have a certain ship at 10 km "locked on", but you decide to aim and shoot a different ship at 12 km, your point of impact deviates considerably from your point of aim. If you shoot at the ship that you have "locked on", then it doesn't matter which plane it is because both planes coincide with the ship. But a ship different from the one you "locked on" is no longer coincident with your "aiming plane" which is why it makes shooting a ship while "locked on" to a different ship quite wonky.

However, my question is, when using a spotter aircraft, does the 2D "aiming plane" return to being horizontal and coincident with the waterline. Because if so, then you can accurately shoot at a ship even when you are locked on to another ship, because now both ships are coincident with the "aiming plane", whereas that wouldn't be the case if the plane is vertical.

Edited by icyplanetnhc

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After further testing in the training room, I firmly believe that the spotter plane does change the aiming plane from vertical to horizontal. Video of the recording is below, and note that I'm "locked on" to a different target than what I am shooting at. If I had CAD software available I can better visually illustrate what I'm referring to, but the video below is an ample demonstration.

The point of this is to demonstrate that since the trajectory of the shell is not coincident with your line of sight, aiming at another ship behind the ship you've "locked on" will result in the shells completely missing, due to the fact that the 2D "aiming plane" is vertical when "locked on" and not using a spotter aircraft. I believe the main reason the game does this is to assist players at aiming at specific areas of the ship they're "locked on" to, i.e. the superstructure, upper belt, turrets, etc.

 

The first 37 seconds are with normal vertical plane aiming, from 0:37 onward is aiming with a spotter aircraft.

https://streamable.com/cnek5 (if Youtube doesn't work for some people)

 

Edited by icyplanetnhc

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