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shadowsrmine

I Know There Must Have Been OTHER Destroyers That Fired From the Bow

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The front like the German  V-25 and V-170  so why are these the only ones and nothing at higher tier?   I wouldn't even mind that they only had the single fire option firing in that way.............Anyone have any input other  than That's The Way It Is.   Now!:etc_red_button::etc_swear:!   ?

Edited by shadowsrmine

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32 minutes ago, shadowsrmine said:

The front like the German  V-25 and V-170  so why are these the only ones and nothing at higher tier?   I wouldn't even mind that they only had the single fire option firing in that way.............Anyone have any input other  than That's The Way It Is.   Now!:etc_red_button::etc_swear:!   ?

When I did a search it mentioned the USS Laffey,USS Murphy

Edited by shadowsrmine

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because navies irl didn't do it. thats the simple answer. the reason for that is probably weight among other things, which i will let someone who knows more about this handle.

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In reality it really wouldn't have mattered where the torpedo launchers were since you can program torps to turn or zig zag or do whatever you want, and so the only reason they might have done it would be if there was some design consideration on the ship that made squeezing them in there instead of a more normal place desirable.

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13 minutes ago, Hanger_18 said:

because navies irl didn't do it. thats the simple answer. the reason for that is probably weight among other things, which i will let someone who knows more about this handle.

From David Lyon's "The First Destroyers" (Naval Institute Press 1996), p98.

"By the time the design of the 27-knotters was being discussed, it would appear there were second thoughts about the suitability of having a fixed bow tube. Its removal would enable more ammunition to be carried for the gun armament, which was felt desirable to increase the ships' anti torpedo boat capabilities. Furthermore, the heavy weight of the torpedo tube forward had an adverse effect upon seaworthiness."

A few paragraphs later, we get Lyon quoting First Sea Lord F W Richards, who wrote in 1893: "The object for which these vessels are required is to clear the Channel of the enemy's torpedo boats and they should have a clean sharp stem with no projections calculated either to check their speed or throw water inboard when in chase."

So it seems there are both balance (in the weight sense), hydrodynamic and habitability issues at stake here. All of this is in relation to early British destroyers, but I can easily see the same considerations having relevance for the German designs. 

Edited by Ensign_Cthulhu
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1 hour ago, Elysion said:

In reality it really wouldn't have mattered where the torpedo launchers were since you can program torps to turn or zig zag or do whatever you want, and so the only reason they might have done it would be if there was some design consideration on the ship that made squeezing them in there instead of a more normal place desirable.

:Smile_great:Perhaps in the 50's they could make them do all this however before and during  WWII  I'd think they had all they could do just to make them run straight true just as the German's had trouble making missiles fly straight and true

Edited by shadowsrmine

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No they could make them turn to a certain degree. Would have to do some research again to see how far they could be preset to. One of the problems they could have though is it could get stuck. I know of one case where a sub torped himself because the torpedo got stuck in a turn and went full circle back into the sub.

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In reality, you would swing the launcher out to give the torpedo the best water entry angle for the speed the ship was traveling at. This changed depending on speed.

You "aimed" the torpedo not with the launcher, but with the gyro angle. Once launched, the guidance system would turn the torpedo to travel on the heading it had been programed to take.

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The only other one I know with front torps was the African Queen.

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36 minutes ago, Vengeance said:

No they could make them turn to a certain degree. Would have to do some research again to see how far they could be preset to. One of the problems they could have though is it could get stuck. I know of one case where a sub torped himself because the torpedo got stuck in a turn and went full circle back into the sub.

I'm pretty sure there was a British cruiser that did this as well.

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Torpedo boats such as the famed US PT boats had fixed forward firing torpedo tubes.  That being said, it wasn't practical for ocean going destroyers to have fixed tubes, try launching a torpedo when the guy pulling the trigger is 40 feet away and not visible to the guy actually steering the ship.  On second thought, PT boats would be awesome, four torpedoes, no reloads, a 20mm main gun battery, and probably less than 1000 HP, what's not to love?

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51 minutes ago, Vengeance said:

No they could make them turn to a certain degree. Would have to do some research again to see how far they could be preset to. One of the problems they could have though is it could get stuck. I know of one case where a sub torped himself because the torpedo got stuck in a turn and went full circle back into the sub.

USS Tang.

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29 minutes ago, Ensign_Cthulhu said:

I'm pretty sure there was a British cruiser that did this as well.

HMS Trinidad. It happened up in the Arctic so freezing may have been an issue.

 

The original torpedo boats were fairly small and designed to be deployed in very large numbers. As they grew it became far more efficient to launch massed salvos off the beam - 8 destroyers firing 6-10 torpedoes each, rather than 20 torpedoes with the problematic bow tubes.

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22 minutes ago, HazardDrake said:

USS Tang.

There's a difference between a sub and destroyer according to the search I just did the USS Tang was a sub?

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40 minutes ago, 56Bravo said:

Torpedo boats such as the famed US PT boats had fixed forward firing torpedo tubes.  That being said, it wasn't practical for ocean going destroyers to have fixed tubes, try launching a torpedo when the guy pulling the trigger is 40 feet away and not visible to the guy actually steering the ship.  On second thought, PT boats would be awesome, four torpedoes, no reloads, a 20mm main gun battery, and probably less than 1000 HP, what's not to love?

USN PT boats mostly didn’t use torpedoes. Early in the war, they didn’t work and weren’t always available, and they were commonly modified with extra deck guns or larger deck guns instead. 

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