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CriMiNaL__

A change to the way smoke is laid out

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With the changes to ships, able to be spotted firing in smoke, eg BB, why do we need different smoke times now in relation to nation.

1 second of smoke in a gearing lasts 6 seconds, so when a gearing lays outs a 30 second smoke line it lasts 180 seconds  (could be wrong on exact time)

Why not have 1 puff of smoke last a set amount of time, and using a slider like we see on the horn ability, you can lay 5 seconds of smoke which might have a duration of 30 seconds, as that might be all you need.

This way all nations have a level playing field when it comes to smoke duration, and it is on the player to control what they are putting out.

WG could even go so far as this, 4 smoke charges would last approx 10 minutes of smoke duration, (round number) you have an indicator (like the horn) that represents this 10 min, so for eg, if you held down you smoke button at the start of the game you could lay 10 min of smoke at your spawn, not that you would want to do that, but you get the idea.

Once the indicator is at 0, you are out of smoke.

This would make breaking LOS easier , not just for a DD but smoking up a team member that needs time to turn unseen to move away.  Smoke would be more flexible for a DD to use not just for themselves.

Edited by CriMiNaL__
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Add wind to the game, so smoke screens dissipate and blow away.

Thunderstorms would immediately quench the cloud.

 

Smoke slider defeats the concept of a Consumable charge.

 

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3 minutes ago, iDuckman said:

Add wind to the game, so smoke screens dissipate and blow away.

That would be viable as well, but it would also have to affect ships shooting at range as well, allowing for wind, also CV would have to face into the wind to launch planes and retrieve them

4 minutes ago, iDuckman said:

Smoke slider defeats the concept of a Consumable charge.

You still get charged for it if you have it, the concept is more of how it is deployed and making use of it in different ways.  If your meaning it is a consumable then a slider only gives you the amount you can use no more and once used that's it.

 

5 minutes ago, iDuckman said:

Thunderstorms would immediately quench the cloud.

Are we not glad that this is a game and not real life.

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Then DDs with hydroacoustic search would be even stronger in the caps, likely to abusive levels.

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1 hour ago, CriMiNaL__ said:

 

Changing smokes to be all the same would be a huge disservice to USN Smoke screen tech.

 

They had the superior tech by miles. It was very top secret stuff.  The Patterson system was a very much a USN tech and it was very different then the other nations smokes. To change it would be a huge disservice to Alonzo Patterson.
 

 

Vapor, not Smoke


     The "smoke" created by this technology was neither a smoke (like the product of the combustion smoke screen methods) nor a chemical gas (like the product of the chemical smoke bombs) but was a vapor of a specially designed formula created by Patterson. This formula was referred to as the Patterson secret formula by the military researchers, but shortly after its implementation, the composition was known as "fog oil," a name that had not entered the lexicon until Patterson's invention.

     The "fog oil" was atomized by specially designed nozzles, injected into a heated chamber, then vaporized, but not burnt, by the hot gasses within. This vaporized fog oil was then ejected into the air by rapidly moving air flow. Upon entering the air outside the heated chamber, the fog oil vapor immediately condensed, forming an extremely thick fog layer that hung close to the ground. According to one of the Patterson patents, and this was confirmed by subsequent Navy researchers as reported in this document, ". . . [the] smoke screen or cloud produced. . . develops a density and opacity greater than the heaviest known natural fog." A person need only imagine the thickest fog they have seen or heard about to realize the enormous obscuring power of this smoke screen. Objects less than 1 foot within the smoke screen were completely hidden from view. It was denser and could be produced faster than any smokescreen ever created.

     The Patterson smoke screen system had another great advantage over all previous smokescreens: it was virtually harmless to troops. It had no known short or medium term toxicity. Long term toxicity may have been possible, most likely only with frequent exposure, but even today, there is no clear evidence of long term side effects resulting from exposure to this type of smoke screen. This is why the main ingredients of the formula remained a part of fog oil compositions long after WWII.

     There were several aspects to the Patterson system, all of which were detailed in his four US patents. First was the fog oil formula which was comprised of three primary components: an oil base, an inorganic mineral salt, and a viscosity inducing agent. To this basic formula were added pigments designed to either whiten the smoke (as would a pigment such as Titanium Dioxide) or color the smoke. In addition graphite was often added to prevent valve clogging. (This graphite was later found to be an effective obscurant against infrared). The Patterson formula (perfected with the help of Harold Levy, a chemist) allowed for many different types of permutations of the basic composition described above. All was detailed in his patents on chemical composition of smoke screen and methods of producing smoke screen. All patents following his--continuing to the present day--use one or more of the various Patterson formulas detailed in his patents.

     Secondly, were the apparatuses involved. There were two types of apparatuses perfected by Patterson, but each performed the same basic task, to provide a heated chamber for the vaporizing of fog oil and to provide a means of rapid ejection of the vapor into the atmosphere. One apparatus, the mechanical smoke generator used the exhaust of an internal combustion engine as a heating heating chamber where atomized fog oil would be injected into for vaporization. The ejection of the vapor was accomplished by the movement of hot exhaust through the air chamber. The hot exhaust gasses, therefore, accomplished two purposes. The exhaust type devices would eventually become he preferred design and would be used to this day.

     The other Patterson apparatus was a furnace design, often referred to as a smoke cannon due to its cannon like appearance. In the furnace design, or smoke cannon, fog oil was fed into an elongated tube (the "cannon") and was vaporized by heat generated by propane or other hot gases. The elongated tube accomplished the same purpose as the exhaust manifold (heating chamber) of the mechanical generator. Rapid ejection of gasses out of the tube was aided by air induction ports connected either to a compressor, or to a compressed air tank. Using a compressor required some sort of power, and this was accomplished by a smaller combustion engine. A compressed air tank did not require power, but it had only a limited supply of compressed air.

     Patterson favored the mechanical generator, and the reason was most likely that it tended to be more efficient, using only one mechanism to both eject vapor and vaporize fog oil. (The principles of this device would later be utilized in 1950s designs using jet engine heat fed into the "smoke cannon" elongated chamber. These simple high output units became standard equipment in the military).


     In the end, the Navy and the other branches of the military, found the smoke screen to be highly effective and extremely important to combat. Prior to the Patterson system, military smoke screening was, at best, a minimal factor in combat, but with the Patterson system, military strategy was forever changed by the numerous offensive and defensive advantages created by the first ever effective large area smoke screen. "
 

 

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7 minutes ago, Cobraclutch said:

Changing smokes to be all the same would be a huge diservice to USN Smoke screen tech.

There is a lot of disservice to all numbers of ships in the game, you could still implement the smoke the same way but have varying values, then if it would please the masses.  What I am mainly suggesting is variable smoke so it can be used more for a team than an individual.

How many times you see a DD smoke up a team a member, then get into trouble and he no longer has his smoke to use, as much as he is valued for doing what he did, you have to play more selfishly by keeping that smoke for you.

Having a choice of laying a small amount for someone when you need to but still able to use it for yourself 1 min later would be better for teams as a whole.

19 minutes ago, BenSinkin said:

Then DDs with hydroacoustic search would be even stronger in the caps, likely to abusive levels.

Not really as like anything there are counter plays for everything, the smoke changes I am suggesting would make things more dynamic in how it is used.

I guess I am thinking more along the lines of supporting a team rather than just saving smoke for myself. 

I will freely admit I do not smoke up team members as much as I used to since the changes of smoke came in, and if I do, it turns out to be my own undoing when I need it myself.

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