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Weirdest Navy Stories

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So I've heard some really weird stories from people's experience in the navy from the crew of a destroyer hoarding beanie babies to a submarine sinking a train so I ask what are some of the weirdest stories you've heard or read from people in the navy?

Keep them to true stories only no ghost stories (that comes later).

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What was the last naval battle of World War 2?

When was the last battle between sailing ships?

When was the last time that the United States boarded an enemy ship in combat?

https://www.navygeneralboard.com/the-last-naval-battle-of-world-war-2/

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1 hour ago, AVR_Project said:

What was the last naval battle of World War 2?

When was the last battle between sailing ships?

When was the last time that the United States boarded an enemy ship in combat?

https://www.navygeneralboard.com/the-last-naval-battle-of-world-war-2/

Great stuff!  Junks are needed in this game. Add them WG. Fighting Junks. 

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Jean Bart

 

Spoiler

The Jean Bart And The France (1919)

jean-bart-casablanca


These two were identical French battleships sent into the Black Sea in April 1919 to assist the anti-Bolshevik White Russians against the Reds in the Russian Civil War. The Allies of the recently concluded World War I sided with the Whites.

The crews of both battleships supported the Reds, not the Whites, but this was not the impetus for their mutinies. The ships had been stationed in the Black Sea for 44 and 43 days to assist the Whites’ defense of Sevastopol. Portions of both crews were given shore leave in Sevastopol. The crews of both ships had specific grievances, and these had little to do with their approval of the Bolshevik cause. Their first grievance was the fact that they were still at sea fighting when World War I had ended and they wanted to go home; they felt they had done enough of their duty. Their second was that the food on board was of insufficient quantity and absolutely intolerable quality.

The ringleaders were Andre Marty, a mechanical engineering officer on the Jean Bart, and Charles Tillon on the France. Since the crews of several hundred were almost unanimously in agreement, the commanders and officers could not stop them, and the mutinies were carried out with a relative lack of violence. On the night of April 19 (Good Friday), the 200 or so sailors on shore refused to obey any further orders. The boiler crews on the France then refused to begin stoking the furnaces the next morning. When dawn broke, the mutiny resumed and in perfect unison, the crews of both ships mustered on decks ignored all commands. They then ran up the red flag of mutiny on both mainmasts. The commander of the Jean Bart was still well-liked by the crew and succeeded in getting someone to obey his order to lower the flag, after which the commander personally ripped it to pieces.

The crew of the France left their mutiny flag flying and controlled an entire section of their ship, then refused the direct order of Vice Admiral Jean-Francois-Charles Amet (who was aboard the Vergniaud) to sail for Constantinople. The crew of the Vergniaud remained neutral until a Greek military detachment on the French side opened fire into the mutinying sailors on land. Two civilians were killed, six French sailors were wounded, and one of them died shoprtly thereafter. This prompted the Vergniaud’s crew to side with the mutineers, and Amet no longer had any choice but to acquiesce to their demands.

The ships departed for home, and upon arrival, Marty and Tillon were arrested and sentenced to 20 years’ hard labor. They were released after five.

 

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1 hour ago, Turbotush said:

USS O’Bannon sinking the RO-34 with taters.

It did what? and how?

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More recently, the Ticonderoga-class cruiser Lake Erie was found to have kept a pet goat aboard... among other not as amusing things. There was also U-1206, which ended up sinking because of a malfunctioning... toilet.

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14 hours ago, SomemuttupNorth said:

More recently, the Ticonderoga-class cruiser Lake Erie was found to have kept a pet goat aboard... among other not as amusing things. There was also U-1206, which ended up sinking because of a malfunctioning... toilet.

Yeah that's the ship with the beanie babies too they had to get rid of the goat because of it being considered illegally imported or something like that so the crew hoarded beanie babies

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4 hours ago, RWBY_Rose said:

OMG was caboose in charge of that ship

"Shortly thereafter, the brand new destroyer, her Captain and the entire crew were placed under arrest"

Unbelievable!  Yet somehow I get the impression that the President found the whole affair somewhat amusing.

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Ooh, I just remembered a good one!

Ok, so, you all know what goes good on a hot day? Well, cold beer, but what else? 

Ice cream.

Problem is, in WW2, the refrigeration equipment needed to make and keep the stuff was so big and bulky, only the big battleships and carriers got it. 

Well, with one exception

image.jpeg.ef1508c8b2c41747c970c2488e4f1691.jpeg

Meet the USS Tabberer (DE-418), a John C. Butler-class destroyer escort (same class as the Samuel B. Roberts, but I digress)

One day in port, she was docked behind some larger ship that was getting a new machine installed. The cook on the "Tabby" comes up with a brilliant idea: he has some crew stage a fight on the docks, and while guards and other sailors are distracted by the brawl, other kitchen staff run off, snatch the machine, and haul it on board. 

From that day on, whenever Tabberer fished a pilot from the drink while on "plane guard" duties, they would present the soaked (and puzzled) flyboy with a bowl of ice cream.

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48 minutes ago, SomemuttupNorth said:

Ooh, I just remembered a good one!

Ok, so, you all know what goes good on a hot day? Well, cold beer, but what else? 

Ice cream.

Problem is, in WW2, the refrigeration equipment needed to make and keep the stuff was so big and bulky, only the big battleships and carriers got it. 

Well, with one exception

image.jpeg.ef1508c8b2c41747c970c2488e4f1691.jpeg

Meet the USS Tabberer (DE-418), a John C. Butler-class destroyer escort (same class as the Samuel B. Roberts, but I digress)

One day in port, she was docked behind some larger ship that was getting a new machine installed. The cook on the "Tabby" comes up with a brilliant idea: he has some crew stage a fight on the docks, and while guards and other sailors are distracted by the brawl, other kitchen staff run off, snatch the machine, and haul it on board. 

From that day on, whenever Tabberer fished a pilot from the drink while on "plane guard" duties, they would present the soaked (and puzzled) flyboy with a bowl of ice cream.

In December 1944, Tabberer lost her mast and radio antennas riding out Typhoon Cobra, which killed 790 sailors (more than were lost at the battles of Midway and Coral Sea combined). Though damaged and unable to radio for help, she was first on the scene to recover 55 of only 93 total rescued from three destroyers which capsized in the heavy seas. Captain Henry Lee Plage earned the Legion of Merit, while the entire crew earned the Navy's Unit Commendation Ribbon.

5ac6c5268fe3a_Tabberer2.jpg.18fbdf47e11bafffd0553ee83c92ed90.jpg

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5 minutes ago, Shigure_DD said:

In December 1944, Tabberer lost her mast and radio antennas riding out Typhoon Cobra, which killed 790 sailors (more than were lost at the battles of Midway and Coral Sea combined). Though damaged and unable to radio for help, she was first on the scene to recover 55 of only 93 total rescued from three destroyers which capsized in the heavy seas. Captain Henry Lee Plage earned the Legion of Merit, while the entire crew earned the Navy's Unit Commendation Ribbon.

5ac6c5268fe3a_Tabberer2.jpg.18fbdf47e11bafffd0553ee83c92ed90.jpg

Yep! Got the story about the ice cream machine from the same book, just withheld that information for now (probably shouldn't have). She was a good little ship, and her crew too.

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Don't know if it qualifies as weird, but the story of the submarine USS S-5 is pretty awesome.  These men were saved in the open ocean by a dirty white tee shirt on the end of a pole sticking out of a small hole.

Ultimately rescued by the crew of a passing freighter off the west coast with just a bit of the stern sticking out of the water, men inside literally asphxiating from battery acid, chlorine gas and sh** pouring out of the head.  Captain of the freighter sails over in his launch, peers into this little hole the sub crew drilled by hand in the stern and asks the standard, What ship is this and where is she bound?  Sub commander, barely conscious, answers, USS S-5, San Diego (or somewhere similar) To Hell by Compass.

One of the coolest lines I've ever heard, in a horrible, impending death situation.  To Hell by Compass, that's my kind of dude.

Edited by BullHalsey

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