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ImperiumDylan

Why do Japanese battleship smokestacks look like that and what type of smokestack are they?

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I want to know because the Japanese battleship smokestacks (Esp. Yamato) have this funnel like shape?

Edited by ImperiumDylan

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wow. no  one answered this yet.

 

Ok, the engineering.. the funnel are the uptake from boilers and they are "Trunked" together for several reasons.    First off it tends to prevent stack gas turbulence forcing that nasty stuff from washing down over the ships aft decks reducing the risk of asphyxiating your own crew!  Lots of heavier then air carbon monoxide, particulates and very little oxygen! You'll notice also that the stacks on the IJN ships are shorter then those of other nations and it does reduce the ship silhouette.

   It's also a stylistic touch.  The lines of IJN ships are typically very distinctive from the fineness of the hull, the graceful loft of the bow and  and dip amidships and aft of the ships main deck. The typical raised fore peak at the bow with a gentle curve to the water line.   The distinctive superstructure features of all IJN classes.   Yep.  Japan likes having ships that are  aesthetically pleasing to the eye.    I love the look of them.

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OF THE 40000 MEN ABORD BOATS IN WW2

30000 DID NOT RETURN

BUT THIS IS NOT THEIR STOREY

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What Warlord said basically sums the functional aspect up. What happened was that most ships used to have many individual, straight funnels. Then Japan designed the innovative and revolutionary light cruiser, the Yubari (in game as a tier 4 cruiser). Lots of features to reduce weight and size while maintaining armour, firepower and speed. One of these was a single trunked funnel, raked backwards (very sexy) to reduce the number of stacks and thus weight, and was very successful. This design (along with others like a flared bow) made it onto many future Japanese designs, like the Fubuki, Akizuki and Shimakaze destroyer-classes, the Furutaka, Aoba, Myoko, Takao, Mogami, Oyodo, Agano and Tone cruiser-classes and the Yamato and WoWS' impression of the Amagi-classes of battleships.

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3 hours ago, TL_Warlord_Roff said:

wow. no  one answered this yet.

 

Ok, the engineering.. the funnel are the uptake from boilers and they are "Trunked" together for several reasons.    First off it tends to prevent stack gas turbulence forcing that nasty stuff from washing down over the ships aft decks reducing the risk of asphyxiating your own crew!  Lots of heavier then air carbon monoxide, particulates and very little oxygen! You'll notice also that the stacks on the IJN ships are shorter then those of other nations and it does reduce the ship silhouette.

   It's also a stylistic touch.  The lines of IJN ships are typically very distinctive from the fineness of the hull, the graceful loft of the bow and  and dip amidships and aft of the ships main deck. The typical raised fore peak at the bow with a gentle curve to the water line.   The distinctive superstructure features of all IJN classes.   Yep.  Japan likes having ships that are  aesthetically pleasing to the eye.    I love the look of them.

It was as much to keep smoke away from rangefinders and spotting positions - plus that efflux is VERY hot, and it can make conditions in the spotting tops in the superstructure rather unpleasant (as the designers and the crews of some British dreadnoughts found out to their embarrassment). Carbon monoxide is only a small part of the story, and not necessarily the most important one.

The other thing is that multiple funnels give the ship a particular profile that can be used to guess at her exact inclination to yours, thus enabling determination of course and heading, and that can aid in gunnery. Having only one clearly visible funnel takes away some of those clues.

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5 hours ago, ImperiumDylan said:

I want to know because the Japanese battleship smokestacks (Esp. Yamato) have this funnel like shape?

The preceding class of Battleship, the Nagato class had a massive problem with funnel smoke, often choking crewmembers on the bridge and blinding them.

1280px-Nagato01cropped.jpg

1280px-Nagato05cropped.jpg

 

"Funnel smoke would often choke and blind crewmen on the bridge and in the fire-control systems so a "fingernail"-shaped deflector was installed on the fore funnel in 1922 to direct the exhaust away from them. It was less than effective and the fore funnel was rebuilt in a serpentine shape in an unsuccessful effort during a refit in 1924.[3] That funnel was eliminated during the ship's 1930s reconstruction when all of her boilers were replaced by ten oil-fired Kampon boilers, which had a working pressure of 22 kg/cm2 (2,157 kPa; 313 psi) and temperature of 300 °C (572 °F)." - Wikipedia

So you'll note that both these refits failed in deflecting the toxic exhaust away from the bridge.  The Yamato class was designed with this problem in mind and was built to deflect away from the bridge, and unified into a single smokestack.

H6Wp41f.jpg

Edited by Sventex

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The ships I like looking at the most are the designs with the least style and the most function. Like, all the engineers and operators got exactly what they wanted and the fat bastards in the admirals lounge had no say at all. Tradition and image be damned I want a pure killing machine on the water. Looks like the japs found both in the latest ships. I think the Germans did too (maybe too much superstructure).

Edited by thebigblue

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Trunking the funnels together also opens up deck space if it's done low enough. Freeing up room for additional weapons and fire control equipment, improving the usable arcs of said equipment and weapons, ect...

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@Sventex I'm curious if you have any information on the smokestacks on the IJN cvs, particularly the ones that are angled downwards. I'm wondering if there was any issues related to their positioning.

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