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dmckay

Curious....screws keep turning?

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This may be a dumb question but I am dumb.  I have noticed that when a ship gets killed and rolls over the screws keep turning and never slow down nor stop. Now seems to me the innards of the ship and boilers would stop producing power (flooding) and those screws would at least slow down or stop turning. I just got blowed up in co-op in Kirov and she actually broke in half which would totally flood the engines but those screws keep revolving at full speed. I guess I can understand that they might for awhile but all the time full speed as the ship disappears? No big deal but is this "screwed up".  Just curious and you can see I got time on my hands. :Smile_teethhappy:

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All arcade game ships have their screws loose for just this purpose... :Smile-_tongue:

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Inertia. Also if the ship splits in the middle, that's generally ahead of the engine room, it's the boilers that are usually in the middle. Take Richelieu for example:
RICHELI1940C220b.gif

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Alpha Tester
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1 hour ago, dmckay said:

This may be a dumb question but I am dumb.  I have noticed that when a ship gets killed and rolls over the screws keep turning and never slow down nor stop. Now seems to me the innards of the ship and boilers would stop producing power (flooding) and those screws would at least slow down or stop turning. I just got blowed up in co-op in Kirov and she actually broke in half which would totally flood the engines but those screws keep revolving at full speed. I guess I can understand that they might for awhile but all the time full speed as the ship disappears? No big deal but is this "screwed up".  Just curious and you can see I got time on my hands. :Smile_teethhappy:

As @Chobittsu said inertia plays a role. Also if a ship sank wile sailing the boilers often remained running, usually due to the engine room crew trying to save themselves. This is often overlooked in movies or occurs because they are using stationary models for a sinking scene. Of course if the boilers are flooded then it doesn't matter the screws will stop eventually. Besides when a ship splits it's usually ahead of the boilers for 2 reasons; 1. The boilers are in the ships citadel. And 2. The bottom of the ship is reinforced to take the weight of the boilers and the vibrations of the boilers and screws. This is seen if you look at the way Titanic sank, after she broke her whole bow section was held on to the stern by the double-bottom near the boiler rooms, it held for about a minute before letting go. You can see it in this video; which shows 2 theories on the sinking. The first from 1995 and the second from 2012:

 

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1 hour ago, Fog_Repair_Ship_Akashi said:

This is often overlooked in movies

Fog is correct. Remember that boilers maintain pressure for some time even when the fires are off. If nobody stopped the screws they would continue to turn. Boiler explosions of sinking ships oftentimes tear them apart underwater. Also, the accident reports of many ship sinking include descriptions of how the screws aided in the sinking by pushing the ship under water after its bow had been submerged.

This is from a Report on the sinking of the HMS Britannic:

Quote

The two lifeboats soon drifted into the giant running propellers, which were almost out of the water by now. As the first one reached the turning blades, the tragedy of the day took place. The spectacle was horrifying and beyond imagination.

 

Edited by Snargfargle

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