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TheGanz

User Interface at 5760x1080

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Any way to move or mod the compass/status window and mini-map window when running 5760x1080 3 monitor?  Compass goes all the way to the left edge of the left monitor and mini-map goes to the right edge of the right monitor.  I'd love to get them both on my middle monitor so I can actually see them :)  Thx

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It certainly looks like WG needs to overhaul the UI and graphics to account for 4k and new generation monitors and vid cards.

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12 minutes ago, Jim_Byrnes said:

It certainly looks like WG needs to overhaul the UI and graphics to account for 4k and new generation monitors and vid cards.

The OP is spanning three 1920 x 1080 monitors and I don't know if there is much he can do besides maybe dropping to one or two monitors. On 4k, that is still very much a niche market even in the US and the EU where people generally have more to spend on their computers. Until the cost to get into 4k drops considerably from the current $1k for the monitor & GPU combo it will remain a niche market. The monitors have dropped a lot but the GPU's haven't.

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12 minutes ago, BrushWolf said:

The OP is spanning three 1920 x 1080 monitors and I don't know if there is much he can do besides maybe dropping to one or two monitors. On 4k, that is still very much a niche market even in the US and the EU where people generally have more to spend on their computers. Until the cost to get into 4k drops considerably from the current $1k for the monitor & GPU combo it will remain a niche market. The monitors have dropped a lot but the GPU's haven't.

Very true indeed yet the niche is/will grow as price continues to drop and available choices increase. WG would be well served and could benefit in the market base by getting ahead of the curve now and set the pace.

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1 minute ago, Jim_Byrnes said:

Very true indeed yet the niche is/will grow as price continues to drop and available choices increase. WG would be well served and could benefit in the market base by getting ahead of the curve now and set the pace.

True but don't forget that in most of WG's market the computers that are being used would be potatoes here.

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It never helps a corporation to be behind the times. Look at Sears, they were one of the biggest mail order companies in the world, since 1886 and look at them now. Amazon killed them. With better insight they could have been Amazon strong instead of Sears weak.

http://www.searsarchives.com/catalogs/history.htm

History of the Sears Catalog spacer.gif
 

The 1943 Sears News Graphic wrote that the Sears catalog, "serves as a mirror of our times, recording for future historians today’s desires, habits, customs, and mode of living." The roots of the Sears catalog are as old as the company. In 1888, Richard Sears first used a printed mailer to advertise watches and jewelry. Under the banner "The R.W. Sears Watch Co." Sears promised his customers that, "we warrant every American watch sold by us, with fair usage, an accurate time keeper for six years – during which time, under our written guarantee we are compelled to keep it in perfect order free of charge."

The time was right for mail order merchandise. Fueled by the Homestead Act of 1862, America’s westward expansion followed the growth of the railroads. The postal system aided the mail order business by permitting the classification of mail order publications as aids in the dissemination of knowledge entitling these catalogs the postage rate of one cent per pound. The advent of Rural Free Delivery in 1896 also made distribution of the catalog economical.

All this set the stage for the Sears, Roebuck and Co. catalog. A master at slogans and catchy phrases, Richard Sears illustrated the cover of his 1894 catalog declaring it the "Book of Bargains: A Money Saver for Everyone," and the "Cheapest Supply House on Earth," claiming that "Our trade reaches around the World." Sears also knew the importance of keeping customers, boldly stating that "We Can’t Afford to Lose a Customer." He proudly included testimonials from satisfied customers and made every effort to assure the reader that Sears had the lowest prices and best values. This catalog expanded from watches and jewelry, offering merchandise such as sewing machines, sporting goods, musical instruments, saddles, firearms, buggies, bicycles, baby carriages, and men’s and children’s clothing. The 1895 catalog added eyeglasses, including a self-test for "old sight, near sight and astigmatism." At this time Sears wrote nearly every line appearing in the catalogs drawing upon his personal experience using language and expressions that appealed to his target customers.

In 1896 Richard Sears added a spring and fall catalog and enlarged the size. He also extended an open invitation for all customers to visit the company’s Chicago headquarters. For the first time the company charged for the catalog. Sears tried to mitigate the 25-cent fee by promising to apply the fee to any orders over 10 dollars. Specialty catalogs now appeared covering such items as bicycles, books, clothing, groceries, pianos and organs, and sewing machines. Sears sold the earliest entertainment centers in the form of magic lanterns. These were either a single slide type, or a version called the chromatrope, which showed a succession of slides giving the viewers a motion picture feel.

Edited by Sovereigndawg
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2 hours ago, Jim_Byrnes said:

It certainly looks like WG needs to overhaul the UI and graphics to account for 4k and new generation monitors and vid cards.

I was going to buy a 4k monitor about 6 months ago, until I learned that the WoWs UI doesn't scale well to that resolution...

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2 hours ago, Thraxian said:

I was going to buy a 4k monitor about 6 months ago, until I learned that the WoWs UI doesn't scale well to that resolution...

If you use other software that supports it and you already have the GPU to drive it at that kind of resolution I would consider getting it and using your current monitor for things that don't support it.

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3 hours ago, Sovereigndawg said:

It never helps a corporation to be behind the times. Look at Sears, they were one of the biggest mail order companies in the world, since 1886 and look at them now. Amazon killed them. With better insight they could have been Amazon strong instead of Sears weak.

http://www.searsarchives.com/catalogs/history.htm

History of the Sears Catalog spacer.gif
 

The 1943 Sears News Graphic wrote that the Sears catalog, "serves as a mirror of our times, recording for future historians today’s desires, habits, customs, and mode of living." The roots of the Sears catalog are as old as the company. In 1888, Richard Sears first used a printed mailer to advertise watches and jewelry. Under the banner "The R.W. Sears Watch Co." Sears promised his customers that, "we warrant every American watch sold by us, with fair usage, an accurate time keeper for six years – during which time, under our written guarantee we are compelled to keep it in perfect order free of charge."

The time was right for mail order merchandise. Fueled by the Homestead Act of 1862, America’s westward expansion followed the growth of the railroads. The postal system aided the mail order business by permitting the classification of mail order publications as aids in the dissemination of knowledge entitling these catalogs the postage rate of one cent per pound. The advent of Rural Free Delivery in 1896 also made distribution of the catalog economical.

All this set the stage for the Sears, Roebuck and Co. catalog. A master at slogans and catchy phrases, Richard Sears illustrated the cover of his 1894 catalog declaring it the "Book of Bargains: A Money Saver for Everyone," and the "Cheapest Supply House on Earth," claiming that "Our trade reaches around the World." Sears also knew the importance of keeping customers, boldly stating that "We Can’t Afford to Lose a Customer." He proudly included testimonials from satisfied customers and made every effort to assure the reader that Sears had the lowest prices and best values. This catalog expanded from watches and jewelry, offering merchandise such as sewing machines, sporting goods, musical instruments, saddles, firearms, buggies, bicycles, baby carriages, and men’s and children’s clothing. The 1895 catalog added eyeglasses, including a self-test for "old sight, near sight and astigmatism." At this time Sears wrote nearly every line appearing in the catalogs drawing upon his personal experience using language and expressions that appealed to his target customers.

In 1896 Richard Sears added a spring and fall catalog and enlarged the size. He also extended an open invitation for all customers to visit the company’s Chicago headquarters. For the first time the company charged for the catalog. Sears tried to mitigate the 25-cent fee by promising to apply the fee to any orders over 10 dollars. Specialty catalogs now appeared covering such items as bicycles, books, clothing, groceries, pianos and organs, and sewing machines. Sears sold the earliest entertainment centers in the form of magic lanterns. These were either a single slide type, or a version called the chromatrope, which showed a succession of slides giving the viewers a motion picture feel.

Yeah Sears and pretty much every other old line store chain dropped the ball on the internet but when Amazon started it was a huge gamble by a small company. When Amazon started doing well is where they all blew it by not getting into internet sales. Yet now pretty much everyone has it now and most even have site to store and even same day pickup.

A bit of a side track I wish the Amazon's and other internet companies would offer more delivery options. I live in a building where the outer door is often locked so UPS, Fedex, and any other delivery company can't get in so I end up going and picking the item up. The USPS though has no problem getting in and even if it takes a day or two longer for me they are the best delivery option for items that they can handle.

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