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Snargfargle

He told the story of America in Song

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Johnny Horton was America's storyteller. He told the story of America in song and, like many singers, died too young. This song of his is most applicable to WOWS. Though it's not about America per se, it's still one of my favorites.

 

 

 

Edited by Snargfargle
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Wow! I didn't think there were still any others like me left that still listened to the old greats!

 

I actually have a Johnny Horton and a Marty Robbins Pandora station that I listen to daily on the way to work. 

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ahhh... marty robbins... I always adored this song... it is one of the best songs to think of when speaking of a classic: 

 

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32 minutes ago, Estimated_Prophet said:

One more Johnny Horton...

 

 

Neat song but I MUST give credit to those British boys. I just must. The DID NOT run. They came right on into Jackson's line and did not stop.  Their plan to bombard American line with gunboats messed up and then things went to hell. Jackson had provost guards behind his line with orders to shoot any American who broke and ran.  Old Hickory. He also was entrenched. Huge advantage. Brits though we would break.....miscalculation.  BUT THEY CAME ON. Biggest Brit defeat ever on American soil. Made Jackson a hero and president. BUT the British did not run. Nope. That needs to be set straight IMO.  Odd in that peace treaty had already been signed.  No smart phones back then.

Edited by dmckay

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2 hours ago, Estimated_Prophet said:

One more Johnny Horton...

 

 

 

My favorite stanza:

 

We looked down the river and we seen the British come

And there must have been a hundred of them beating on the drum

They stepped so high and they made their bugles ring

We stood beside our cotton bales and didn't say a thing

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I've actually seen this horse. I used to walk by it every day on my way down to the Comparative Anatomy lab at KU.

 

 

 

 

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The Banjo defines America.

 

and if you didn't click on this you are missing out.

Well then there is this but anything wit Earl is good.

and if you liked that. you really need to hear the grandmothers song.

Then of course history.

Sorry if this thread is about Johnny, but I thought it was more music. In America this is our instrument possibly Canada too.

I actually don't listen to music when playing but I could battle to the Banjo.

If you get nothing from my post, just listen for the Banjo in just about every show you see on TV.

It's the easiest string instrument to play.

I was learning to play one and even ordered a kit and made one but crushed my left forefinger (which may be why I seem to be able to W,A,S better than D) and couldn't play any more, I might get some more kits and make them though, at least I can still do that, the one I made was beautiful and sounded great.

 

                                                                                            Sovereigndawg

 

PS The Banjo I made was an "Orange Blossom Special" The difference in the sound, which comes from the rings, is cool to research. Old Growth Maple from the Northeast US and Canada is preferred. Before we settled here, there was apparently very cold winters, for a long period in those areas. Even today, Banjo manufacturers will seek out old warehouses to buy. So that they can, recycle the floor joists and beams to make Banjo rings for the sound quality, that the old growth maple produced. It was because the tree rings were tighter during the cold snap. Johnny Horton uses Banjos a lot.

Edited by Sovereigndawg

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On 13/12/2017 at 5:56 AM, Sovereigndawg said:

The Banjo defines America.

 

and if you didn't click on this you are missing out.

Well then there is this but anything wit Earl is good.

and if you liked that. you really need to hear the grandmothers song.

Then of course history.

Sorry if this thread is about Johnny, but I thought it was more music. In America this is our instrument possibly Canada too.

I actually don't listen to music when playing but I could battle to the Banjo.

If you get nothing from my post, just listen for the Banjo in just about every show you see on TV.

It's the easiest string instrument to play.

I was learning to play one and even ordered a kit and made one but crushed my left forefinger (which may be why I seem to be able to W,A,S better than D) and couldn't play any more, I might get some more kits and make them though, at least I can still do that, the one I made was beautiful and sounded great.

 

                                                                                            Sovereigndawg

 

PS The Banjo I made was an "Orange Blossom Special" The difference in the sound, which comes from the rings, is cool to research. Old Growth Maple from the Northeast US and Canada is preferred. Before we settled here, there was apparently very cold winters, for a long period in those areas. Even today, Banjo manufacturers will seek out old warehouses to buy. So that they can, recycle the floor joists and beams to make Banjo rings for the sound quality, that the old growth maple produced. It was because the tree rings were tighter during the cold snap. Johnny Horton uses Banjos a lot.

Gotta love a good banjo!

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