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So who served in the navy? Which ship did you serve on? And tell us a memorable experience!

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I have a deep respect for all who served in any branch in the military! But since this is a naval game, let's hear some of those!

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I was Army, but I am a Navy brat. Be 12 yrs old, go on a Father-son cruise from Moorhead City, NC to Little Creek Amphib base Va Beach, VA. My Dad is a Chief Petty Officer handed me off the his men for awhile and they stuff me full of ice cream, cake, hot dogs, hamburgers, soda and bug juice. When we went around Cape Hatteras later that night it fairly lumpy which I am sure his men knew would be. The USS Spegal Grove (LSD-32) does not have the best ride and I proceded to decorate the Chief's Quarters with vomit in numerous places for quite some time. I did not realize till later in life how my Dad's men set up my Dad and the other Chiefs. I wish I could give 'em a "Well Done" :Smile_teethhappy:

Edited by DeadMeat_015
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I served in the Norwegian Navy

Jokes aside, I was in the Royal Canadian Air Cadets for several years with the intent on joining the Air Force, but several medical issues kept me out, poor eyesight, low bone density, those sorta things...
But military service ran in my family for over 100 years, Gramps was RCAF from '43 to '75, great-gramps was a machine-gunner at Vimy, other great-gramps was in the Royal Artillery. After all that it doesn't hurt to take a break for a generation or two~   XD    My mother was born and raised for a quite some time at CFB Borden, but I was born long after Gramps had retired and the family had moved off-base, so my only real military interactions were through Cadets and their summer training course, plus one very interesting winter course where I dug a series of Vietcong tunnels through the snow as part of a shelter which I made needlessly complex and large.
If you want great stories I'm afraid I don't have many of my own, but once my Gramps is dead and can no longer share any of his own I'll compile them all to share with the world (no sense in writing em all down only to have a new one pop up)

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USS Thomaston LSD 28

http://www.ussthomaston.com/history.html

 Leaving Po hang Harbor

Pohang.thumb.jpg.1b90665c6632fddbac3f2c5406c72a99.jpg

The Captain decides to put some boats in the water. He was advised that the transmission was slipping in the Captains gig by the Master Chief Machinists Mate, I just happened to be the Bow-hook. The Captain decides to put us in anyway. Dare I mention, that there was a Typhoon raging about 20 miles away and there were 40 foot rollers and high gusty winds as a result of the encroaching storm? Well there was.

We launched the Boat successfully before we cleared the jetty. Aboard was the Boat officer an Ensign, The Coxswain a 2nd Class Petty Officer, The Engine-man a 3rd Class Petty Officer, a Signalman, a Radioman and of course myself as the Bow-hook Seaman Sovereigndawg.

Since I mentioned it before, it is probably needless for me to say the transmission started to slip the moment we hit the water and the ship started to pull away from us. She was only doing 10 knots and we should have been able to do 40 knots easily. We were able to eek out 4 or 5 only. As we were falling further behind the ship, our Boat Officer (let's call him Ensign Lemon) Was Holding on to a rail with a death grip and crying every time we crested another wave.

We were a good 1/4 of a mile or better behind the ship when the Captain Decided to stroll out of the bridge and all of the way aft to the flight deck. A fellow Boatswains Mate was on after watch there. He was a farm boy from Arkansas and got sea sick on the  smoothest of seas. When it was rough he always had a garbage bag tied to his belt while on duty. Anyhow, The Captain asks him where the Captains Gig is, he points and tells him right there. The Captain says where I don't see it. My buddy pointed and said there just wait and in another 5 seconds or so we popped into view as we crested the next wave.

Finally the Captain had decided that we shouldn't launch the other boats and that we needed to get back aboard. The problem with that was that we kept falling behind. Ensign Lemon was still crying and holding on to that bar for dear life. I later found out that he was a music major in college and joined through ROTC and had never been on a little boat in his life. The Captain orders the ship to slow to 4 knots and we finally catch up to her.

As we pull up to the ship, which has turned so we weren't getting the full brunt of the swells but we were still riding at least 25 foot swells up and down they send us the Sea Painter. If you don't know what that is, it is a Howser line with a cable loop on our end. It is attached to a cleat on the ship and the cable loop is designed to hook onto a cleat on our boat. It is designed to hold you in the right place, while the ship tows you beside it and lowers the davits to pick you up.

My job is to hook up the front pulley (which weighs 300 lbs) to a little eye on the front of the boat. The Engine man stands ready to hook up the back but can't do that until the front hook is attached or we pitch pole bow first and flip. Now there are line handlers and 2 lines are attached to the boat on the ocean side and while I am trying to wrestle this 300 lb block into a tiny eye while the boat is rising and lowering 25 ft. The bow line pulls taught and rips across my face, tearing the steel helmet from my head and sends it flipping about 50 ft out into the ocean.

I am trying to recover from almost having my face ripped off and I look over to see Ensign Lemon, who wants to be back on that ship so badly that he can't think right, grabbing the cable end of the sea painter because it almost off of the cleat as we were rising on a swell. Well if the boat pulled tight on the cable he would have lost all of his fingers. I started swearing every swear word I know at him and screamed at him to get in the cabin and stay there. Which thankfully he did. As we would come to the top of a swell we were even with the deck and the Captain and Boatswain were standing there and heard me screaming obscenities at Ensign Lemon. I really wasn't worried about it at the time. I finally got the bow hooked up (not easy at all). The Engine-man had seconds to get his pulley hooked. If he didn't we stood the risk of being picked up by the bow and of course we would all fall into the ocean.

I guess since I am writing this you can all assume that I and the crew made it on board, which we did. Of course that is when the backlash occurred. It seems that the Captain didn't like me shouting expletives at his Ensign, I got written up and sent to my first Captains mast for some NJP (Non Judicial Punishment). I got 45 days restricted to the ship and 45 days extra duty. I might have gotten fined also, which is half pay.

You might think that I was mad about that but when it comes down to it, a mans hand is worth it. Ensign Lemon gained a lot of respect for me that day and tried to talk to the Captain on my behalf. He never quit thanking me till the day I left. The Captain got his Karma too. After I got out the next West Pac that the good old Tommy T went on. The Captain ran her aground in Pearl Harbor and as a result got a sweet Court Marshal.

A couple of last tidbits of information USS Thomaston was the oldest ship in service at the time. The Boat Coxswains name believe it or not was Parks and he was no coward. There was a lot more that happened, I kept the story as short as I could though. This was just one of so many tales that happened aboard the Tommy T.

 

 

 

Edited by Sovereigndawg
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I served 8 years as an Electrician's Mate in the US Navy, from 1971-1980.

My screen name is a reference to Task Force 77, what we called the Tonkin Gulf Yacht Club during the Vietnam war.  TF77 was the carrier battle force of the 7th Fleet in Vietnam/Yankee Station.

I served mostly on cruisers, the USS Long Beach (CGN-9) and USS Chicago (CG-11).  We performed the PIRAZ air defense and coordination mission.

I finished my service as Engineer of a Navy harbor tug at Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay.

Edited by TF77
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I was in the US Navy from 1988-94.  Never served on a ship, however.

When I went in and was picking my rate, my detailer was trying to get me aviation electronics.  Said he had a "TAR" spot open, but didn't explain what that was.  At 18 yrs old, I didn't ask.  "TAR" = Training and Administration of Reserves.  As an active duty sailor, I was assigned to a reserve P-3 squadron (VP-60, now decommissioned) on a little air base south of the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, called NAS Glenview (it's gone now, too).

4yJseSM.jpg

Our reservists came in on the weekends and broke all our stuff, and we spent the next week getting it RFI again.

Still got to Okinawa for a detachment.  I got flown via P-3 many times when I had training in Norfolk or Jacksonville.  Not a lot of cool Navy stories to tell, though.

*edit - I had several jobs during those 6 years, all with VP-60.  I was first assigned to the flight line.  We used tugs to move the aircraft into and out of the hangars, stood out front when they started up the engines for tests or launch, took fuel samples from the 5 tanks for pre-flights, etc.  Fuel samples were fun...particularly during a nice Chicago winter.  We had a box with 6 mason jars, and a jar would screw onto a pole with a probe on the end you would use to drain some fuel out of each tank (to check for water in the fuel).  Being jet fuel we had to protect ourselves from spillage with rubber gloves.  You couldn't fit a liner under these gloves.  So, during a -10 winter day with 15 mph winds, your hands would freeze in those gloves.  Jet fuel spillage on the stick and the mason jars gets very slippery.  Numb hands, slippery glass = a dropped mason jar.  Great.  Time for a FOD clean up on the flight line.  Still, it was pretty brainless work but I really enjoyed working with the aircraft and smelling like jet fuel exhaust.

After that I went to intermediate avionics repair.  I was in a mobile maintenance facility, which was a group of metal boxes that linked together to create a maintenance complex.  The whole thing could be separated and flown anywhere.  Eventually I got into micro-miniature repair (solder tech), where I removed resistors, capacitors, chips, etc from the circuit boards, and did general circuit board repair.  I enjoyed that, too, but being out with the planes was my thing.  I should have stayed o-level, which was actually troubleshooting components on the aircraft.  In i-level the defective components (radio, radar, IFF, etc) were removed and sent to us.

Edited by desmo_2
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Currently serving in the Royal Navy.  Navigation Officer onboard HMS Westminster.  Been in for 10 years now and don't plan on leaving until they tell me to lol.

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My father was a Chief Petty Officer and served aboard the USS Milius DDG-69

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Milius

 

He retired a few years ago, and is now driving for Conway Freight. I don't know too much about his service and what all he participated in during his time in the Navy. I do remember him telling me that he was the one who gave orders to the part of the crew that operated the weapons controls. Basically telling the what, how much and which target to shoot/launch missiles at. And there were only the Captain and the Senior Chief Petty Officer on board that he took orders from.

 

The picture is him and I before he was promoted to CPO.

 

That's all I really know about him as a Naval officer, we don't talk much and we don't really know each other due to him being absent for almost my entire childhood and the stresses/problems that were created from that affecting our relationship.

20170606_210427_1496808368517_001_1496808427088.jpg

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US Navy, as you can read from my signature I served on 2 ships.  Of course the best was the USS TEXAS CGN-39 for over 5 years first as a Nuclear Machinist Mate  (MM) and then as an  Engineering Laboratory Technician (ELT)

One time we were in port in Subic Bay, Philippines for a short refit at the naval base.  The ship was pulling out in 2 days, we always start up the reactors and engine rooms, get all of the equipment ready the day before we pull out.  The Captain wanted to do a Reactor and engine room startup, and test all the equipment to see if everything was fixed and working correctly, then shut down until the next day.  So, my watch section wasn't scheduled to go on watch until 5 PM in Engine Room #2.  Now this is plenty of time for this evolution to be completed before our scheduled time.  So, we expected to go on liberty at 5 pm with everyone else.  WRONG!  The first two watch sections failed to get steam up and we had to go take their place.  We did a complete startup, test and shutdown finishing at 7:30 pm.  Now the schedule was for the same watch sections to go on at the same time the next day as this day.  So, we thought we wouldn't be called on until 5 p.m. the next day.

Our whole watch section of MM's then went out on the town together.  So, that night we went bar hopping, their were 7 of us altogether.  We drank 13 pitchers of MoJo a local concoction of fruit juice and hard liquor, usually a 1/4 of a pitcher would get a person drunk, we had almost 2 pitchers per person.  We also each drank about 1 1/2 cases of beer.  We stopped drinking about 5 am and got back to the ship at 5:30 am.  I collapsed in my rack, drunk as a skunk, we all were.  Then at 6 am, revile, when we are supposed to get up, we were ll woken up and told the Captain was so impressed with our watch section that he wanted us to do the startup that morning.  Of course we all thought, FRACK ME!  So, when we all got in the engine room we laid down around the entrance to the control center called the Enclosed Operating Space (EOS).  We were all still very drunk waiting for the officer in charge to came down.  The other watch standers had also gone out and were either drunk or hung over.  So, we were all on our backs when the officer showed up, hung over and told us we couldn't have even one little error to cause anyone to come down and check on us.  That was the safest Reactor startup and engine room startup we ever did!  Because we got out EVERY book and read EVERY procedure as we performed it!  We were all scared S@#$lless that we would be found out, drunk on watch, and well, it wouldn't be pretty what happened next.  So, that day a group of extremely drunk and/or hungover sailors started up a Nuclear Reactor and engine room with absolutely no incidents earning another Bravo-Zulu from the Captain, completely unaware that we did it while still drunk!

Or maybe I'm making this all up as a colorful tale.  You'll have to decide for yourself.

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Wow I didn't expect all of this! Great stories guys! Keep them coming! I read every single one of them!

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Served on board USS Coral Sea from 1966-70.  Liberty calls were Yokosuka, Hong Kong, and of course the P.I.  Olongapo City is a place that you just can’t shake out of your memory.  Anything and everything you have ever heard about that place, regardless of how crazy and insane it may sound, is to be believed.  Think of it:  10 cent beers, 20 cent cocktails, no cover charges, and God only knows how many $5.00 hookers.  There were really no rules except get your butt back thru the gate before the end of liberty or you get to know the Shore Patrol, and those boys were a somewhat sadistic lot when they could get their hands on a fleet sailor.  

 

I resolved to stay on board ship during liberty call in the P.I. on my fourth cruise.  There was nothing in Ologopo City that I hadn’t seen or done and I was done with that place.  So, I stood watch for other E5’s who were reserves making their first cruise, and who had not experienced the joys of and wonders of the sleaziest city in the Pacific.  Standing watch entailed not much more than helping smashed sailors get to their rack in one piece with their money and health and making sure that injured/unconscious guys were taken to sickbay.  “Drunk watch” was aptly named and was serious business, but it was a source of some hilarity.  One example among many:  One early morning, after the drunk rush at midnight, a cab pulled onto the carrier dock and stopped at the afterbrow.  After a few minutes a nearly nude sailor appeared and began to ascend the brow.  He had on a white cap, skivies, shoes, and was cradling a small monkey that he purchased in town.  Ok we thought, get hold of the monkey first, and then deal with the sailor second.  The grab for the monkey went poorly and the animal was soon in the hangar bay and the sailor started balling about what %@#$=‘s we were, puked, and passed out.  He was a big guy and toting his fat butt into the O2 level was a pain, but the real problem was how to catch that monkey who had by now  made his way to the hangar bay overhead where it was impossible to catch.  The next morning the monkey had drawn a crowd of very amused onlookers who cheered the little creatures ability to outwit capture attempts by the more serious and senior folks on board.  We were amazed that this little guy could scamper and jump from pipe to pipe with amazing speed.  The futile capture attempts soon ceased as folks became aware of the impossibility of netting a healthy monkey who was 20 ft above their heads and the monkey was simply left alone until it got hungry.

 

Eventually the monkey was coaxed down with food.  His fate is unknown to me, probably went overboard where most unwanted things went, and no one got their butts chewed.  I was very short, hated the Navy but that damn monkey kept me in a good mood until I departed the Navy 30 days later.  Still makes me laugh to this day.

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23 hours ago, Chobittsu said:

I served in the Norwegian Navy

That was freekin hilarious!  Thanks.  I needed a good laugh tonight.

 

I never served in the military.  By the time I decided that it would be cool to fly and aced all the tests (1974?), I was informed that I was too old to drive.  (at 21!?)

My dad was a corpsman attached to the Marines in Barstow, CA (where he met my mom, a nurses aide).  He was never deployed overseas.  Go Navy!

Edited by iDuckman

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Retired from the USN in August 1993 after 21 years service as a Cryptologic Technician.  Most of my service was ashore in Japan, Hawaii, Washington DC, Great Lakes Training Center staff and Norfolk VA as a military courier.  

 

I served in two ships, USS Caron (DD 970) and USS Nassau (LHA 4) earning my Enlisted Surface Warfare pin in Caron.  I made one full and a half Mediterranean deployments in her and two cruises to the Black Sea where we were frequently overflown by the Soviet Naval Air Force and escorted by Red Banner Black Sea Fleet and by KGB Border Force surface ships.  Very shortly after I left the ship during that 2nd Med cruise, during yet another Black Sea Cruise both Caron and cruiser Yorktown were "bumped" (deliberate collisions) by KGB frigates, video on YouTube.

 

We were also involved in the Achille Lauro  highjacking, following the cruise liner from just over the horizon and acted as one of the Air Control ships that guided fleet F-14s to intercept the Egypt Air flight with the Lauro highjackers aboard to force it to land at the Naval Air Station in Sicily.  Also cruised below COL Quadaffi's "Line of Death" during that engagement between 6th Fleet and the Libyans.

 

I flew out to USS Nassau in time to take part in Operation Desert Storm, 20 miles off the coast of Kuwait and inside the area that Saddam's forces had mined.  Two of the ships with us, USS Tripoli and cruiser USS Princeton found mines the hard way, getting badly damaged but no fatalities in either case.  Both ships were eventually repaired and returned to service.  I also watched as Battleships Missouri and Wisconsin lit the night sky firing 16" rounds into Iraqi Army positions in Kuwait while covering a mixed USMC, Saudi and Free Kuwait force as it moved along the coast against the Iraqi's.

 

The following February we (Nassau) proceeded North through the Denmark Strait (near HMS Hood's final resting place) to the Arctic Ocean, ran into hurricane force winds, 40 foot seas (with occasional 60 footers) and found this big flat bottomed bucket WILL roll (36 degrees at one point) suffering moderate damage and several injuries as she rolled or was slammed by 60 foot waves.  I retired off the Nassau in 1993.

 

Caron is gone now, decommissioned in 2001 right after the 9/11 terror attacks and sunk during "explosive testing" in 1,000 fathoms (6000 feet) off Puerto Rico.  Nassau was decommissioned in March 2011 and is moored with a reserve fleet in Beaumont Texas, the former Tripoli nested alongside. 

Edited by CAPT_Rob
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Not a sailor, but was a Mechanic for a year 94-95? , on a RO/RO ship https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USNS_PFC_Dewayne_T._Williams_(T-AK-3009) for the USMC out in the Pacific for a year. Had to sign articles so IDK USMM , 1 year? Anyway , cool job , spent many days on Saipan, Guam, Oki,  Korea, New Calidonia. Got my Shellback, going to Australia, saw the place but never set foot on it(anchored a mile offshore for a week or two). Hung out with SEALS(actually SEAL team 6 before they were called that) who did anti-piracy training on our ship for a few weeks, got to shoot a bunch of their weapons, and did some drinking in Korea. Saipan was cool, you could walk down a street there and go from PI, to China , to   Japan , to America, by just walking into various bars, restaurants, and businesses. Korea, Guam, and OKi , nice(Guam was kinda sleezy ,Pohang Korea too). Was a good year, but being a ship eventually got to me so I only did a one year contract. I can say I did the Orient. :)

Edited by Strachwitz666
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20 hours ago, monkfish47 said:

Served on board USS Coral Sea from 1966-70.  Liberty calls were Yokosuka, Hong Kong, and of course the P.I.  Olongapo City is a place that you just can’t shake out of your memory.  Anything and everything you have ever heard about that place, regardless of how crazy and insane it may sound, is to be believed.  Think of it:  10 cent beers, 20 cent cocktails, no cover charges, and God only knows how many $5.00 hookers.  There were really no rules except get your butt back thru the gate before the end of liberty or you get to know the Shore Patrol, and those boys were a somewhat sadistic lot when they could get their hands on a fleet sailor.  

 

 

One of my Dad's sea stories that I have heard him tell, and I wonder if its the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth (like you should with all good sea stories, but there is also always some truth in them IMHO). He has several about the rowdyness of the crew of the USS Cone DD866, and one of them is being asked to leave Olongapo early (kicked out) from a liberty call in 1967 or 68. I have heard how wild the place was around that time , and your story confirms that, and I wonder what a DD crew could do in 1 night to get thrown out :)

Edited by DeadMeat_015

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Hello DeadMeat

 

Ships were commonly kicked out of Subic Bay.  The smaller the ship, the more likely you might be asked to leave.  Larger ships, especially CVA’s, had an enormous impact on the base exchanges and the private concerns in Olongopo, Manila, Baguio.  (Not sure about that spelling; that’s where officers went to get “a little”). A tin can has about 225 sailors and the average CVA carries 5k.  If both ships crews are busting up the furniture, which one is gonna be sent packing!?  I can’t state for a fact that this happened but I was told on good authority that one of the Forrestal class bird farms was either restricted to ship, or that there were two  carriers in port and they were both restricted to their respective ship.  Memory fails me, I’m 70 today.  When drunk sailors and marines from different commands met one another in the bars/streets/docks/em clubs the stuff hit the proverbial fan.  Usually, the boat gets the boot when their crew decides it might be fun to tear apart government property—EM clubs being the favored victims.  Buy, it wasn’t just enlisted 18 year olds doing the head busting; officers, especially Navy pilots, had a habit of ripping officer clubs to shreds.  Being “gentleman”, they passed the hat to pay for the damage they did to the hilltop O-club in Subic.  They managed to tear the bar off it’s foundation and move it partially out of the club.  Did I not tell you that the “Drunk Watch” was fun?!  I could go on for a while on just this port....

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54 minutes ago, monkfish47 said:

Hello DeadMeat

 

Ships were commonly kicked out of Subic Bay.  The smaller the ship, the more likely you might be asked to leave.  Larger ships, especially CVA’s, had an enormous impact on the base exchanges and the private concerns in Olongopo, Manila, Baguio.  (Not sure about that spelling; that’s where officers went to get “a little”). A tin can has about 225 sailors and the average CVA carries 5k.  If both ships crews are busting up the furniture, which one is gonna be sent packing!?  I can’t state for a fact that this happened but I was told on good authority that one of the Forrestal class bird farms was either restricted to ship, or that there were two  carriers in port and they were both restricted to their respective ship.  Memory fails me, I’m 70 today.  When drunk sailors and marines from different commands met one another in the bars/streets/docks/em clubs the stuff hit the proverbial fan.  Usually, the boat gets the boot when their crew decides it might be fun to tear apart government property—EM clubs being the favored victims.  Buy, it wasn’t just enlisted 18 year olds doing the head busting; officers, especially Navy pilots, had a habit of ripping officer clubs to shreds.  Being “gentleman”, they passed the hat to pay for the damage they did to the hilltop O-club in Subic.  They managed to tear the bar off it’s foundation and move it partially out of the club.  Did I not tell you that the “Drunk Watch” was fun?!  I could go on for a while on just this port....

I remember him telling someone they would take chalk with them, and if the bar was a to be avoided or was "safe" they would mark a symbol on the door/door frame for their shipmates lol. Myself having experienced going "down range" (many many bars out side of outside of Camp Casey Korea) the crap we did to get into and out of alcoholic trouble was insane, looking back at it now so I am not sure I could ever call [edited] on one of his drinking seas stories cause some of the ones I have are "f" ing crazy :) . The military's and its attitude towards alcohol has changed a lot over the last 30-40 years, used to be you could not make E7 without at least one Article-15 

Edited by DeadMeat_015
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8 hours ago, DeadMeat_015 said:

I remember him telling someone they would take chalk with them, and if the bar was a to be avoided or was "safe" they would mark a symbol on the door/door frame for their shipmates lol. Myself having experienced going "down range" (many many bars out side of outside of Camp Casey Korea) the crap we did to get into and out of alcoholic trouble was insane, looking back at it now so I am not sure I could ever call [edited] on one of his drinking seas stories cause some of the ones I have are "f" ing crazy :) . The military's and its attitude towards alcohol has changed a lot over the last 30-40 years, used to be you could not make E7 without at least one Article-15 

Now an Article -15 can kill a career. Yes, it is correct about ship /unit bars in all services. You could easily have a problem if you walked into a bar that was considered a specific unit's bar, some places you best be with somebody from that unit who would vouch for you, even that might not work . This all works just the same as "local" bars, or biker bars, you better be from that neighborhood/town or be in the same gang, otherwise you are "trespassing" and must be there looking for a fight because it is gonna happen. 

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I joined the Navy in '73 under a program that would start me at E-3, guarantee my choice of schooling (Nuclear Propulsion), but I would have to serve 6 years active due to the length the training involved.  The only problem is that I am partially colorblind (red/green), and apparently, for some reason, they get a little sensitive about the possibility of someone connecting the green wire to the red wire in a nuclear reactor.  Thus, despite taking (and failing) a colorblindness test at the entrance exam (something I could have told them even without the test), I got to boot camp, and a second test disqualified me from that schooling.

While I could have gotten out (because it was a guaranteed program), I took the second option, which was to pick a different school while keeping the E-3 and dropping my active duty commitment back to 4 years.  I became an Aerographer's Mate, which is the Navy's weather service rating.  That gave me a very interesting set of duty stations.

My schooling was at Lakehurst, New Jersey, which is where the Hindenburg crashed.  After schooling, I was stationed on Midway Island for 15 months.  After that, I was stationed at North Island Naval Air Station near San Diego.  That command was a "Mobile Detachment," so we deployed on ships that normally didn't carry weather personnel.  Likewise, the deployments were typically short term.  We would usually take one ship across then detach from that ship and attach to another ship coming back.  As a result, I was out on eight different ships in my time there:

USS Fox - CG-33
USS Gridley - CG-21
USS Okinawa - LPH-3
USS New Orleans - LPH-11
USS Juneau - LPD-10
USS Dubuque - LPD-8
USS Fort Fisher - LSD-40
USNS Passumpsic - T-AO-107

My longest deployment was on the USS Fox.  We stayed with her for 6 months on a cruise into the Indian Ocean.  That includes a month's stop over in the Philippines where we detached from the Fox and attached to the weather office at the NAS at Cubi Point until she got underway again.  During that time, I went out with the USS New Orleans for a week.

In addition to being at Lakehurst and Midway, two historically significant sites, I got to the Philippines, Okinawa (the island, not the ship), Singapore, Karachi (Pakistan), Reunion Island, the Seychelles, and Diego Garcia (a remote Naval Base in the middle of the Indian Ocean).  I also got to go to Sydney, Australia (on the USS Okinawa as a part of a multi-nation amphibious exercise).

My fondest memories, though, were at Midway and getting to see the Albatross (Goonie Birds) in person as well as getting to be at such an historical site that not a lot of people, comparatively, will ever get to see, let alone live on.

However, since you specifically asked about ships, I think one of the funniest things was on that cruise on the Fox.  One of the stops was Reunion Island, which is a French possession near Madagascar.  No one there we encountered spoke English (or maybe more accurately: being a French possession, deigned to speak it to us :Smile_smile:).  So several of us were in a restaurant where the menu was in, of course, French, and none of us spoke French.  We ordered the only thing we could somewhat identify, which was something spelled like hamburger, so we figured it might at least be something made with ground beef, and it was.  It was a layer of ground beef with a layer of some kind of cheese topped with another layer of ground beef (think like a fancy meatloaf kind of dish).  The waiter brought it, but as is not atypical with French cuisine, it was closer to the "still on the hoof" side of the cooking scale than the well-done side.  So we preceded to try to explain to the waiter that we would like it a little less rare, which was amusing since he did not speak English and we did not speak French.

The problem was quickly resolved, however, when one of the guys held up the dish, took out a lighter, lit it, and waved it back and forth under the dish.  We all started laughing, including the waiter who now understood and took them back for a little more cooking time.

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26 yrs, retired Operations Specialist

USS Fiske DD 842, Bayonne New Jersey

USS Constellation CV 64 San Diego Ca

USS Fox CG 33, San Diego Ca

USS Kitty Hawk San Diego Ca/Yokosuka Japan

Shellback(5), Golden Shellback (3)

16+yrs on ship, 10 Westpacs/Middle East Deployments

Will share sea stories over an Ice Cold San Miguel Beer, I live in Angeles City Philippines, about an hour north of Olongopo.  Long live LBFM's

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41 minutes ago, ACScott said:

Will share sea stories over an Ice Cold San Miguel Beer, I live in Angeles City Philippines, about an hour north of Olongopo.  Long live LBFM's

LOL, yer a sick man! We stopped by Subic on the way back from Desert Storm and stayed a week. San Miguel was terrible but so cheap I couldn't complain. Met the most beautiful bar girl in Olongopo and had a great time my whole stay. We exchanged addresses but as my luck went, Mount Pinatubo erupted a few months later and lost contact with her. I never found out whether she was just displaced or a casualty. One of my biggest regrets in life was not returning to the PI, the people were so great and it was so beautiful there. I was a 4.0 sailor but an hour before ship's movement I was drunk off my butt with a girl on each arm in downtown Olongopo telling my OIC that I was staying.... He smacked me across the back of my head and drug me back to the ship. I should have fought him....

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I served 85-89 Active, then reserve through 93. Avionics - F14 Tomcat

VF124 Gunfighters

NRCV59 Forrestal

NRCV65 Enterprise

My squadron's mission was to train new fighter pilots from Pensacola, the Tomcat and provide a ready replacement inventory of aircraft for the fleet. Needless to say, wasn't deployed. I did however get some limited sea time during Carrier Qualification Dets. During that time I was on:

CVN70 USS Carl Vinson

CV64 USS Constellation

CV61 USS Ranger

CV62 USS Independence

Funny story..  While doing a CQ on Independence, one of our Tomcats dropped the VDI display before launch. It's the main computer display for the pilot. Only thing we could do quickly was change a converter located in the port avionics bay. Supervisor sends me to get a converter while the port engine is shut down and the rest of my team is getting the panel off and current converter pulled.

We had some parts staged close to the ready room and raced down there to get the converter. For some reason a huge group of people were in my way while I was running to get the part. I happened to notice they were a mix of officers and civilians as I barreled through them shouting "Make a Hole! MIGS in bound!!". Grabbed the replacement part and threw it on my shoulder ( thing weighed 40lbs? ).. ran back to the flight deck, but not before barreling through the same group again... Second time my language got a bit more salty...

Got to the deck and waved to the deck chief and he gave go ahead to cross the foul line to the other side of the deck. Threw the converter into the bay, ducked out of the way while my teammates secured it. Pilot gave a thumbs up! System working and taxied to forward cat and launched him for his trip back to NAS Miramar. High Fives all around.

After flight ops, we all gathered for a debrief by our chief and officer in charge. At that time I found out I had run over the Executive Officer of the ship and a US Senator twice...  I thought for sure I was going to be busted to E -100.....

However, the old commander in charge of our little group said to me " Next time the XO comes to chew me out, he better have a broken arm, back to work". Was I relieved. 

AT3 BURL

 

FlightDeck1.jpg

 

That's me on the left.

Edited by MCBURL
forgot something.
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On 11/19/2017 at 11:53 AM, CAPT_Rob said:

Retired from the USN in August 1993 after 21 years service as a Cryptologic Technician.  Most of my service was ashore in Japan, Hawaii, Washington DC, Great Lakes Training Center staff and Norfolk VA as a military courier.  

 

I served in two ships, USS Caron (DD 970) and USS Nassau (LHA 4) earning my Enlisted Surface Warfare pin in Caron.  I made one full and a half Mediterranean deployments in her and two cruises to the Black Sea where we were frequently overflown by the Soviet Naval Air Force and escorted by Red Banner Black Sea Fleet and by KGB Border Force surface ships.  Very shortly after I left the ship during that 2nd Med cruise, during yet another Black Sea Cruise both Caron and cruiser Yorktown were "bumped" (deliberate collisions) by KGB frigates, video on YouTube.

 

We were also involved in the Achille Lauro  highjacking, following the cruise liner from just over the horizon and acted as one of the Air Control ships that guided fleet F-14s to intercept the Egypt Air flight with the Lauro highjackers aboard to force it to land at the Naval Air Station in Sicily.  Also cruised below COL Quadaffi's "Line of Death" during that engagement between 6th Fleet and the Libyans.

 

I flew out to USS Nassau in time to take part in Operation Desert Storm, 20 miles off the coast of Kuwait and inside the area that Saddam's forces had mined.  Two of the ships with us, USS Tripoli and cruiser USS Princeton found mines the hard way, getting badly damaged but no fatalities in either case.  Both ships were eventually repaired and returned to service.  I also watched as Battleships Missouri and Wisconsin lit the night sky firing 16" rounds into Iraqi Army positions in Kuwait while covering a mixed USMC, Saudi and Free Kuwait force as it moved along the coast against the Iraqi's.

 

The following February we (Nassau) proceeded North through the Denmark Strait (near HMS Hood's final resting place) to the Arctic Ocean, ran into hurricane force winds, 40 foot seas (with occasional 60 footers) and found this big flat bottomed bucket WILL roll (36 degrees at one point) suffering moderate damage and several injuries as she rolled or was slammed by 60 foot waves.  I retired off the Nassau in 1993.

 

Caron is gone now, decommissioned in 2001 right after the 9/11 terror attacks and sunk during "explosive testing" in 1,000 fathoms (6000 feet) off Puerto Rico.  Nassau was decommissioned in March 2011 and is moored with a reserve fleet in Beaumont Texas, the former Tripoli nested alongside. 

 

 You and I did some sailing together in 86'. I was on the Ticonderoga (CG47) for my first cruise when when OVL Ops went down. It was Tico, Caron, and Scott (DDG995) that crossed the line that day. Gulf of Sidra Yacht Club, still have the patch, I should, I designed it. We had SM2 Block 2's on all 4 rails when the Libyans started sending up Mig 27's and immediately locking us with their FCS radar.  3 CVBG's in the Med at the time for that crap, America, Coral Sea, and Kennedy. The attack went down the morning of my 19th Bday.

 I heard the Caron stayed at GQ for the entire time we were below the line. True?

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On 11/28/2017 at 9:12 AM, Ares1967 said:

 

 You and I did some sailing together in 86'. I was on the Ticonderoga (CG47) for my first cruise when when OVL Ops went down. It was Tico, Caron, and Scott (DDG995) that crossed the line that day. Gulf of Sidra Yacht Club, still have the patch, I should, I designed it. We had SM2 Block 2's on all 4 rails when the Libyans started sending up Mig 27's and immediately locking us with their FCS radar.  3 CVBG's in the Med at the time for that crap, America, Coral Sea, and Kennedy. The attack went down the morning of my 19th Bday.

 I heard the Caron stayed at GQ for the entire time we were below the line. True?

At GQ the whole time?  No, we stayed at Condition II up until the Libs started shooting SAMs, but since everyone KNEW there was going to be a fight this time we all stayed near our stations.  It took less than 3 minutes from the first gong to "Manned and Ready, Zebra Set."  Even though I was a CT my GQ station was in DC Central / Central Control.  Commodore Goodwin (SAG Commander) requested you guys because Yorktown was down to single generator operation / combat ineffective but kept his Flag in Caron.

 

There were a couple of missile boats within easy Harpoon range.  Captain Harlow wanted to launch on the closest one (less than 30 miles) and close at flank 3 to finish him off with 5".  Commodore said "No, let the airdales take him."  An A-6 hit him with a single 'poon that came in too high, hit his mast and flattened everything to the main deck.  That boat limped home.  Needless to say the skipper was pissed.

 

Your old girl Ticonderoga is still up at Philly last I heard (saw her on drone footage last summer, hull number still clearly visible,) Scott is in the Taiwan Navy and Caron is at the bottom of the Caribbean. 

 

Be well shipmate.

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