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Chobittsu

Wargaming thought they were sneaky

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Next time you put a French railway station on an island, you should probably make the island large enough for a rail network~

shot-17_10.25_15_21.59-0996.thumb.jpg.fc59bfc71ad943117eb8a08d345343f3.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/ca/Limoges_-_2014-07-11_-_IMG_5932.jpg/1920px-Limoges_-_2014-07-11_-_IMG_5932.jpg

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They built the station in anticipation of a railroad bridge being built from the mainland.

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Why did the French build a railroad terminal on an island?

"I give up!"

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21 minutes ago, Taggeth said:

Why did the French build a railroad terminal on an island?

"I give up!"

Oh, nice...it took me a minute...

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35 minutes ago, Taggeth said:

Why did the French build a railroad terminal on an island?

"I give up!"

mfonbvQ.gif

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42 minutes ago, Taggeth said:

Why did the French build a railroad terminal on an island?

"I give up!"

Laughed out loud, +1 for you - even though it is a horrible and invalid characterization. But, we get enough guff about "Muricans" so it's all fun.

Edited by SmirkingGerbil
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There is probably a large steampunk underwater train tunnel network.

 

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1 hour ago, SmirkingGerbil said:

even though it is a horrible and invalid characterization.

 

Perhaps; others involve only dropped once rifles and battles that can't be won without a Corsican being involved.

 

Like many other things; the bad from French military history tend to get emphasised over the good.

 

Thus; collapse in WW2 is all anyone seems to remember; as opposed to what the Free French did, or even further back at a place called Verdun, or when the French helped us at Chesapeake Bay, and at Yorktown.

Edited by Estimated_Prophet

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12 minutes ago, Estimated_Prophet said:

 

Perhaps; others involve only dropped once rifles and battles that can't be won without a Corsican being involved.

 

Like many other things; the bad from French military history tend to get emphasised over the good.

 

Thus; collapse in WW2 is all anyone seems to remember; as opposed to what the Free French did, or even further back at a place called Verdun, or when the French helped us at Chesapeake Bay, and at Yorktown.

Exactly. Also, all the underground work they did for the allies prepping for D Day. They still treat those cemeteries (Normandy) with more reverence than most American's can muster on their own soil in regards to our own veterans.

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2 hours ago, SmirkingGerbil said:

Exactly. Also, all the underground work they did for the allies prepping for D Day. They still treat those cemeteries (Normandy) with more reverence than most American's can muster on their own soil in regards to our own veterans.

And there were far worse military blunders than being outnumbered and outgunned in a surprise attack.
It could have been worse, could have been the Russian navy on it's way to and during the Battle of Tsushima. If ever you want to have a nice long laugh, look up what all they did along the route to Japan

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5 hours ago, Estimated_Prophet said:

when the French helped us at Chesapeake Bay, and at Yorktown.

The American Revolution would have fizzled out and died were it not for French intervention. What a lot of Americans don't realize is that our "American Revolution" (which wasn't really a revolution), was just part of a world war that the British were fighting at the time. The French did more than "help" at several key battles of the American Revolution too, many they essentially fought themselves, with some help from the Americans.

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1 minute ago, Snargfargle said:

The American Revolution would have fizzled out and died were it not for French intervention. What a lot of Americans don't realize is that our "American Revolution" (which wasn't really a revolution), was just part of a world war that the British were fighting at the time. The French did more than "help" at several key battles of the American Revolution too, many they essentially fought themselves, with some help from the Americans.

Pipe down and go potato a battle or two bro.

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1 minute ago, WhiteRecon said:

Pipe down and go potato a battle or two bro.

Might I suggest that you study some history? My father is a retired history teacher. We have a basement full of historical books and documents. And before you suggest that I'm "anti-American," you need to know that you are talking to a US Army veteran here.

Edited by Snargfargle
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7 hours ago, WhiteRecon said:

Pipe down and go potato a battle or two bro.

Ill formed nationalism, or just bad education - regardless, we owe the French a lot in regards to our bid for independence. Granted, the French were more than happy to take a jab at Great Britain, so maybe not completely altruistic, but vitally important to our bid for freedom.

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4 hours ago, SmirkingGerbil said:

Ill formed nationalism, or just bad education - regardless, we owe the French a lot in regards to our bid for independence. Granted, the French were more than happy to take a jab at Great Britain, so maybe not completely altruistic, but vitally important to our bid for freedom.

There is a reason that Benjamin Franklin is on the American 100 dollar bill, even though he wasn't a president. Not only was he the equivalent of a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, his efforts to convince the French to assist the rebelling British colonists were instrumental in their victory.

 

With French help, the 13 southern American colonies (and Vermont, which fought as an independent republic) succeeded in causing enough trouble for the British that they finally just let them do their own thing so that they could concentrate their war efforts elsewhere. Remember too that the American colonists, for the most part, were British themselves. The so-called American Revolution was actually a civil war that broke out in a part of the British Empire while it was fighting a much bigger war. As many Americans fought on the side of the British or were indifferent as fought with the rebels. In the South, especially, Americans fought each other as much or more than they fought the British Army. Plus there was an Indian war going on at the frontier too (for both sides). Tens of thousands of loyalists fled to Canada to avoid persecution once the rebellion was successful.

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48 minutes ago, Snargfargle said:

There is a reason that Benjamin Franklin is on the American 100 dollar bill, even though he wasn't a president. Not only was he the equivalent of a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, his efforts to convince the French to assist the rebelling British colonists were instrumental in their victory.

 

With French help, the 13 southern American colonies (and Vermont, which fought as an independent republic) succeeded in causing enough trouble for the British that they finally just let them do their own thing so that they could concentrate their war efforts elsewhere. Remember too that the American colonists, for the most part, were British themselves. The so-called American Revolution was actually a civil war that broke out in a part of the British Empire while it was fighting a much bigger war. As many Americans fought on the side of the British or were indifferent as fought with the rebels. In the South, especially, Americans fought each other as much or more than they fought the British Army. Plus there was an Indian war going on at the frontier too (for both sides). Tens of thousands of loyalists fled to Canada to avoid persecution once the rebellion was successful.

Another point people like to forget is that the British didn't ship entire armies across the Atlantic. The majority of the Redcoats that the Americans fought were American loyalists, despite what Hollywood will tell you with films like The Patriot. It's far easier and more economical to ship 50 officers and supplies to arm 1000 men than it is to ship 100 officers and men

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13 minutes ago, Chobittsu said:

Another point people like to forget is that the British didn't ship entire armies across the Atlantic. The majority of the Redcoats that the Americans fought were American loyalists, despite what Hollywood will tell you with films like The Patriot. It's far easier and more economical to ship 50 officers and supplies to arm 1000 men than it is to ship 100 officers and men

Just as many of the Confederate officers in the American Civil War were former US officers, so too were many of the Continental Army officers former British colonial officers. George Washington was a British colonial army officer during the French and Indian war and really wanted to be a bonafide redcoat himself.

 

Quote

The Virginia Regiment was the first full-time American military unit in the colonies, as opposed to part-time militias and the British regular units. Washington happily accepted his commission, but the coveted red coat of officer rank (and the accompanying pay) continued to elude him. Washington never gained the commission in the British army that he yearned for, but he did gain valuable military, political, and leadership skills.

 

One of the main reasons that Washington was appointed as the commander of the Continental Army was that he wore his old Colonial officer's uniform to the meetings as a reminder that he actually had some prior military service.

Edited by Snargfargle
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1 hour ago, Snargfargle said:

There is a reason that Benjamin Franklin is on the American 100 dollar bill, even though he wasn't a president. Not only was he the equivalent of a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, his efforts to convince the French to assist the rebelling British colonists were instrumental in their victory.

 

With French help, the 13 southern American colonies (and Vermont, which fought as an independent republic) succeeded in causing enough trouble for the British that they finally just let them do their own thing so that they could concentrate their war efforts elsewhere. Remember too that the American colonists, for the most part, were British themselves. The so-called American Revolution was actually a civil war that broke out in a part of the British Empire while it was fighting a much bigger war. As many Americans fought on the side of the British or were indifferent as fought with the rebels. In the South, especially, Americans fought each other as much or more than they fought the British Army. Plus there was an Indian war going on at the frontier too (for both sides). Tens of thousands of loyalists fled to Canada to avoid persecution once the rebellion was successful.

Even Benjamin fought that in his own family, as William was a loyalist and they would remain estranged over it. Of course Deborah was also left on the outs while Ben stayed in France for long periods, and of course had his dalliances - he was a bit of a cad.

Our founding fathers have quite colorful backgrounds, were very human, and had weaknesses - except maybe John Adams, that guy was as straight as an arrow - lol.

Love this history stuff!

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23 hours ago, Snargfargle said:

Might I suggest that you study some history? My father is a retired history teacher. We have a basement full of historical books and documents. And before you suggest that I'm "anti-American," you need to know that you are talking to a US Army veteran here.

You got all that from 'pipe down'?  Glad you served, wish i did.  

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11 hours ago, Chobittsu said:

The majority of the Redcoats that the Americans fought were American loyalists, despite what Hollywood will tell you with films like The Patriot. 

There is very little in "The Patriot," or any of Mel Gibson's other movies, that is historical. The exception might be the film adaptation of "We Were Soldiers Once and Young." which I've heard was good but never have seen.

 

And you are correct about the loyalists. The American Revolution was more of a civil war than anything. Ironically, when the southern states pretty much did what the 13 colonies had "four score and seven years" previously, the US defeated them. If Britain hadn't been fighting a larger war at the time, it probably would have quelled the American rebellion too.

 

It's interesting to speculate what the Americas would be like politically if this had happened. With slavery being abolished in the British Empire in 1833, the issue of slavery, one of the major causes if the US Civil War, might have gone away. The US (perhaps now called "British America") would have undoubtedly have eventually gained independence as did Canada, Australia and all of the other former British colonies. In hindsight, one wonders if the American Revolution was even necessary.

 

However, without the American Revolution, North America would be geopolitically much different than it is now. The Russians may have permanently settled in Alaska. French cultural influence may well have spread more widely in Canada due to the lack of tens of thousands of loyalists fleeing to there from the US. The Indians may have come together under a leader such as Tecumseh and formed a nation in the middle of the continent. And Spain probably would have held on to much of the southwestern part of the continent.

Edited by Snargfargle

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