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AHLA, HMS Hood. (Image heavy)

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Hi guys! 

 

As requested by several people, including @RivertheRoyal (Favorite ship from history) and @SireneRacker, here is the Historical Look At, HMS Hood.

Pictures from various sources including google image search and http://blog.livedoor.jp/irootoko_jr/

Previous AHLA's and pictures linked in my sig, and if you like these posts, be sure to follow me! :Smile_Default:

Let's get this show on the seas!

 

 

 

 

ogzqbEn.jpg

HMS Hood, March 17, 1924. The largest battlecruiser ever built.

 

 

HMS Hood, Admiral-class battlecruiser, Royal Navy. Hood, named after Admiral Samuel Hood, was commissioned on May 15, 1920 with a displacement of 47,430 tons fully loaded; had a length of 860 feet, a width of 104 ft, a draft of 32 ft, and had a top speed of 31 knots (57 km/h; 36 mph) as built, 28 knots (52 km/h; 32 mph) as sunk. She had a range of 5,332 nautical miles at 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph), powered by 24 x Yarrow boilers powering Brown-Curtis geared steam turbines turning 4 shafts producing 144,000 shaft horsepower; her complement was 1,325 sailors and officers. Her armament consisted of 8 x 15 inch BL Mk II naval guns in 4 dual turrets in an A, B, X, Y configuration with B and X guns superfiring; 14 x 4 inch QF Mk XVI DP guns in 7 dual mounts; 24 x 40mm QF 2-pounder "Pom-poms" in 3 octuple mounts; 20 x .50 caliber Vickers AA machine guns in 5 quad mounts; and 5 x 20 barrel Unrotated Projectile mounts. She had no sisters, she was one of a kind.

 

 

JOhNFzN.jpg

Hood docked at Devonport Dockyard, Devon.

 

 

HMS Hood. The pride of the Royal Navy, for 20 years until her death by the guns of Bismarck. The Hood, when she was built was widely regarded as the finest looking warship ever built, as well as carrying the distinction of the largest warship afloat for the next 20 years. Her size and armament earned her the nickname, "Mighty Hood" and she came to symbolize the might of the British Empire itself. 

 

Shortly after commissioning she became the flagship of the Battlecruiser Squadron of the Atlantic Fleet under the command of Rear Admiral Sir Roger Keyes. Under his command, she sailed to various ports of call showcasing her might. When she visited Australia in 1924 she and the squadron escorted the battlecruiser HMAS Australia out for scuttling in compliance with the Washington Naval Treaty.

 

She continued training visits for the rest of the decade. On January 23, 1935 she was rammed by HMS Renown during maneuvers in the Mediterranean. Both captains and the squadron commander were court-martialled but only Renown's commander was relieved. In August of 1935 she participated in King George V's Silver Jubilee Fleet Review, and in May, 1937 participated in King George VI's Coronation Fleet Review. 

 

y7kiXiR.jpg

Coronation Fleet Review, May 1937. Foreground is Admiral Graf Spee, middle is HMS Revenge or one of her sisters, and in the background is Hood.

 

 

Hood was due to be modernized in 1941 to bring her up to standards similar to other modernized WWI-era ships. She would have lost her torpedo tubes, had her conning tower removed, and have her bridge superstructure redone. She was in constant service her entire life and desperately needed the overhaul, however with the outbreak of WWII the RN could not afford to have her out of service. This led to many problems including the limiting of her top speed due to reduced steam output

 

During Operation Catapult, Hood and aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal were ordered to Gibraltar to join Force H where Hood became the flagship. Force H participated in the attack on Mers-el-Kébir in July 1940. Hood damaged Dunkerque with four 15" shells, which forced her to beach herself; Hood in turn took straddles from Dunkerque. Strasbourg escaped and Hood with several light cruisers gave chase but were unable to locate her; during this, Hood had to dodge torpedoes from a French sloop and stripped a turbine reaching 28 knots.

 

Hood was then relieved of flagship duties by Renown after returning to Scapa Flow, on August 10, 1940. On October 28 she was dispatched to hunt down Admiral Sheer, and on December 24, was sent out to find Admiral Hipper, but was unsuccessful in both missions. In January 1941, she entered a refit period which lasted till March, and even then she was still in poor condition, but the threat of German capital ships meant she could not be taken to dock for overhaul until more of the King George V-class battleships were completed. She was ordered soon after refit to intercept Scharnhorst and Gneisenau, however she was unsuccessful and was then ordered to patrol the Bay of Biscay in case any German ships attempted to break out of Brest. She was then ordered to the Norwegian Sea after a false report of Bismarck sailing from Germany. 

 

paG9902.jpg

Hood entering Malta's Grand Harbor. Neutrality tricolors can be seen on her B turret roof.

 

 

When Bismarck made her breakout into the Atlantic, Hood and the newly commissioned HMS Prince of Wales were sent out to find her, to stop her from breaking out into the Atlantic to raid shipping. Hood, under the command of Captain Ralph Kerr, and flying the flag of Vice-Admiral Lancelot Holland soon caught up to Bismarck and her escort, Prinz Eugen on May 24, 1941. 

 

HOOD023.jpg

The final image of Hood, taken from Prince of Wales.

 

 

The squadron spotted the German ships, but the Germans were already aware of their presence, Prinz Eugen had already picked up high speed propellers on her hydrophones. Hood opened fire at 05:52 engaging Prinz Eugen, the lead ship in the formation, and the Germans returned fire at 05:55, both concentrating on Hood. Prinz Eugen struck first hitting Hood on her boat deck, between her funnels, and started a large fire among the ready to use ammo for the AA guns and the rockets of the UP mounts. 

 

iFVluVR.jpg

Hood moored at Australia. 

 

 

At 06:00 while Hood was turning to unmask her stern guns she was hit again on the boat deck by one or more shells from Bismarck's fifth salvo, fired from 16,650m. A shell from the salvo appeared to hit the spotting top as the deck was showered debris and body parts. A huge jet of flame burst out of Hood in the vicinity of the mainmast followed by a devastating magazine explosion that destroyed the aft part of the ship. This explosion broke the back of Hood, and the last sight of the ship, which sank in only three minutes, was her bow nearly, vertical in the water. Hood sank with 1418 men aboard. Only three survived: Ordinary Signalman Ted Briggs, Able Seaman Robert Tilburn, and Midshipman William John Dundas. The three were rescued about two hours after the sinking by the destroyer HMS Electra, which spotted substantial debris but no bodies.

 

kVmJr36.png

Hood with HMS Repulse anchored off the Outer Harbor, South Australia.

 

 

The sinking of the Hood was a major blow to the British. Not only was it a major ship capable of defending the nation, it was a blow to their pride. Hood was seen as the mightiest thing afloat, and she was sunk within 10 minutes of her first true battle. It is a tragedy the loss of life as well, 1,418 sailors were lost that day, and remain on duty.

 

That is all for the historical portion. I will finish with a few more pictures of Hood. Enjoy!

 

28vlagI.png

Hood at anchor colorized. 

 

 

HXFAFAa.jpg

During the Spanish Civil War, neutral nations painted colors such as this, on the tops of the turrets to distinguish neutrality.

 

 

AUCCsgR.jpg

Mighty Hood. Seen here in an early configuration, before her mid-30s refit.

 

 

dhm1271.jpg

A painting of Hood opening fire on Bismarck from artist Ivan Berryman.

 

 

 

 

 

That is all folks I hope you enjoyed! Not sure what I will do next but stay tuned! I'll likely have another picture post soon so be on the lookout. 

And as always: Fair winds and following seas captains! :Smile_honoring:

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I'd only ever seen pictures and model kits of Hood, and never really thought her very impressive or beautiful.

Until I got her in my port, and could look at her from all angles. The lines, the superstructure, the length - yeah, I can see why the British loved the look of this ship. Still doesn't change the fact that she is like a failed actress to me, a goodlooking woman who thinks she's more glamorous than she really is.

Nice writeup, great pictures. Thanks for posting.

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makes you wonder, how different would things be if Hood hadn't have been sunk? if she and PoW had sunk Bismarck and Prinz that day, or if that final shot she took, supposedly final shot as she was sinking, a "defiance shot" as i've heard it called, somehow hit Bismarck and detonated her as well

Edited by tcbaker777

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also WG, i think Doom should be a CC or something, come on, he has many knowledges of ships of war

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Functional aesthetic/ I like those straight no nonsense funnels, the pure uninterrupted sheerline for 3/4 of her length, all calmly purposeful. "No need to show off" it says.

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Hood and I shared some good times together. I wish she was around to see the end of the war, too. 
5740c71afd4cd9693df3a8e09c175db8.jpg(Gibraltar, between 1930 and 1935)
 

Quote

 On January 23, 1935 she was rammed by HMS Renown during maneuvers in the Mediterranean. Both captains and the squadron commander were court-martialled but only Renown's commander was relieved.


Sawbridge was eventually reinstated though. There were some odd signals flown during that maneuver and mistakes were made on both sides. 
 

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On 9/19/2017 at 3:08 PM, Battlecruiser_RenownMkI said:

Hood and I shared some good times together. I wish she was around to see the end of the war, too. 
5740c71afd4cd9693df3a8e09c175db8.jpg

(Gibraltar, between 1930 and 1935)

That is a nice photo, I'm saving that. Here you can really see why at long distances it might be difficult to distinguish between the two.

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17 hours ago, Doomlock said:

That is a nice photo, I'm saving that. Here you can really see why at long distances it might be difficult to distinguish between the two.


I've got tons more (mostly of me) but I have a few FB groups I'm connected through that prides themselves on rarely-before-seen pics of Hood and Renown and Repulse, and a few others. 

 

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6 minutes ago, Battlecruiser_RenownMkI said:


I've got tons more (mostly of me) but I have a few FB groups I'm connected through that prides themselves on rarely-before-seen pics of Hood and Renown and Repulse, and a few others. 

 

The colorized ones in my post were ones I had never seen before either. Heck even some of the black and whites were new to me.

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6 minutes ago, Doomlock said:

The colorized ones in my post were ones I had never seen before either. Heck even some of the black and whites were new to me.


Yeah, the one of Hood entering Malta is definitely a good one! Very crisp coloring! 

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