Doomlock

Color Pics of the Murakumo, Kaba, Momo, Kawakaze, Minekaze, Kamikaze, and Mutsuki-classes. (Image heavy)

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Hi guys! So this is it, the last of my colorized pictures series. It's been fun, but they run out eventually. But don't worry, I'm not leaving or done, oh no. You think these are all the pics I got? I got plenty more, and I'll be bringing plenty more to you guys. Due to the number of pics, this post will take a comment as well, so don't leave. As per usual, the pics come from:  http://blog.livedoor.jp/irootoko_jr/ 

Let's get this show on the seas!

 

 

 

 

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We begin with the Murakumo-class destroyer, Shiranui, at Yokosuka. Shiranui herself served from 1899-1925 and had several roles in the IJN from destroyer, to minesweeper, to dispatch vessel. She was broken up February 25, 1925.

 

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The Kaba-class destroyer, Katsura on July 4, 1917 at the Brindisi Adriatic Sea; the large ship above her bow is the Italian armored cruiser San Marco (Credit to Admiral Franz von Hipper for the ID). She saw service in WWI on the side of the Allied Powers, serving under the command of the Royal Navy as escorts and anti submarine countermeasures. She survived the war and was retired on April 4, 1932.

 

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Two Kaba-class destroyers, Ume, and Kusunoki, in port at the Old Port of Montreal. Deployed under the same circumstances as their sister in WWI and were retired on the same day.

 

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The Momo-class destroyer, Hinoki, on sea trials at Miyazu Bay, February, 1917. She had an unremarkable career and was broken up May 1, 1940.

 

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The destroyer Kawakaze, first of her class, on sea trials at Tateyama, October, 1918. She and her sister, Tanikaze were the only two of her class, and were the first to use the Type 3 12cm/45 naval guns, and new 21 inch torpedoes in triple launchers. The two served inter war and were retired in 1934-35.

 

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The much beloved Minekaze, at Yokosuka, August 30, 1932. She was a radical departure from the previous IJN DD designs which up to this point followed closely to British designs. The class were mostly second rate destroyers by the time of WWII as they were vastly inferior to the Fubuki-class and the subsequent destroyers. Nevertheless, they had a decent war career; 11 were lost, 4 were retired, with two being war prizes. Minekaze herself was torpedoed by USS Pogy (SS-266) off E Taiwan and sunk.

 

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Okikaze, at Yokosuka, November 18, 1932. She mostly was an anti submarine patrol craft outside Tokyo, until she was torpedoed within sight of Yokosuka by USS Trigger (SS-237).

 

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Yūkaze at Yokosuka, September 12, 1928. Yūkaze served as Hōshō's escort throughout the war, and never left her side. She was given to the RN after the war as a war prize in Singapore, and was subsequently scrapped.

 

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Shimakaze (I) at Tateyama Bay, August, 1923. Not to be confused with the super destroyer of the same name, Shimakaze the first, had a small career as a patrol boat in WWII. She was escorting the fleet oiler Akebono in the Bismarck archipelago when she was torpedoed by USS Guardfish (SS-217) and sunk.

 

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The Kamikaze-class destroyer, Hayate on sea trials at Tateyama in November, 1925. Hayate had the unfortunate distinction of being the first IJN destroyer lost in the war being sunk at the Battle of Wake Island on December 11, 1941. She was hit by the shore battery in the aft section of the ship causing a large explosion indicating a detonation of the aft torpedo mount or, less likely, the depth charge racks.

 

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Asanagi, at Osaka Bay, December 29, 1924. Asanagi mostly provided cover for the landings of Rabaul, New Britain, Lae, and Salamaua. Throughout the war, she was an escort and covering ship, until she was sunk returning from Saipan to Japan by USS Pollack (SS-180), on May 20, 1944.

 

 

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An utterly stunning photo of Yūnagi on September 5, 1936. Much like her sisters, she was a second rate destroyer and assigned to convoy escort duties. On July 4, 1943 she assisted in sinking USS Strong (DD-467), and she escorted Admiral Jisaburō Ozawa’s 1st Supply Force at the Battle of the Philippine Sea. She was torpedoed and sunk by USS Picuda (SS-382).

 

 

 

The Mutsuki-class coming up after the break, don't go anywhere. No seriously, don't just leave a comment on the first half and don't stay for the rest.

Edited by Doomlock

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Mutsuki-class destroyer, Kisaragi in February, 1927. Kisaragi and her sister Mutsuki were both at the Battle of Wake Island covering the invading forces, however the force came under air attack and Kisaragi was sunk making her the second IJN destroyer sunk in the war, shortly after Hayate.

 

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Yayoi, at anchor in February, 1926. Yayoi was a part of the force invading Wake Island in the Battle of Wake Island, both the first and second invasion forces. She escorted convoys and covered landings in New Guinea and Indonesia. She rescued survivors from Mutsuki after she was sunk by B-17 bombers. She was sunk after air attack by B-17 and B-25 bombers northwest of Vakuta Island.

 

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Uzuki on sea trials at Tateyama, in August, 1926. She participated in the landings in New Guinea and Indonesia, made supply runs on the Tokyo Express, and escorted convoys. She was torpedoed by PT boats, PT-490 and PT-492 northeast of Cebu and exploded.

 

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Minazuki on sea trials, February, 1927. She made Tokyo Express runs, one of which had her run into 3 USN destroyers getting hit with three shell, but they were duds. She was sunk after leaving Tawitawi by USS Harder (SS-257).

 

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Fumizuki at anchor, July, 1926. As with most of her sisters, she was assigned escort duty and Tokyo Express runs. She was torpedoed and sunk by Grumman TBF Avengers at Truk during Operation Hailstorm.

 

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Kikuzuki, at anchor at Saeki Bay, October, 1932. During the invasion of Tulagi she was sunk by aircraft from USS Yorktown (CV-5).

 

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Mikazuki at anchor at Saeki Bay, March 8, 1933. Mikazuki was mainly an escort ship and a Tokyo Express ship. During the Battle of Kula Gulf she landed Special Naval Landing Forces under fire; she also provided cover during the Battle of Kolobangara. She grounded on a reef during a troop transport mission, and was sunk the next day by B-25 bombers.

 

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 Mochizuki, underway at speed on August 7, 1932. She was part of the invasion force for Wake Island; afterwards she escorted convoys. She provided cover for Chōkai and Kinugasa during their bombardment of Henderson Field. During the Battle of Kula Gulf she engaged the US destroyers USS Radford (DD-446) and USS Nicholas (DD-449) suffering minor damage. On one of her Tokyo Express runs, she was attacked by USN PBY Catalinas, she was sunk after a direct bomb hit engineering.

 

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The last one on the list, Yūzuki. Yūzuki was a part of the invasion force for Guam as well as the force invading New Ireland. She made many Tokyo Express runs before, while escorting a troop convoy from Manila to Omroc, she was sunk by USMC aircraft.

 

 

 

 

That's all folks I hope you enjoyed. Be on the lookout for a post soon about how I will handle picture posts from here. Until then, 

Fair winds and following seas captains! :honoring:


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The battleship to the left in the July 4, 1917 of DD Katsura is either a Satsuma-class or Katori-class, however the funnels are too close to differentiate.


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I was thinking the Kawakaze was going to be the 1936 shiratsuyu class.


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Comment pictures are done.

 

I was thinking the Kawakaze was going to be the 1936 shiratsuyu class.

 

If I had her colorized, she'd be with her sisters in a previous post. :)

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Posted (edited) · Report post

The battleship to the left in the July 4, 1917 of DD Katsura is either a Satsuma-class or Katori-class, however the funnels are too close to differentiate.

 

It is the San Marco from the Italian San Giorgio class armoured cruisers.

 

Jane's is pretty useful. :P

Edited by Admiral_Franz_von_Hipper

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It is one of the Italian San Giorgio class armoured cruisers.

 

Thank you, I was looking at my pics of those battleships and the superstructures weren't lining up.


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These are amazing photos. I love them. Thanks for sharing.


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