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HowitzerBlitzer

Citadel hit noise is accurate.

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Had someone's oxy-acet torch pop and then whistle beside my left ear as I was reaching down for my striker today. Two hours later it's still ringing and yes, it sounded like I was hit in the citadel.

 

If anyone wants to complain about the citadel hit sound, I suggest you go hear a loud bang/pop next to your ear, and then come back.

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Iirc many of the people complaining suffer from chronic tinnitus making the sound worse for them while most of us aren't bothered by it.

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I rather have a different sound, like a modded one. But no one haven't figure out how yet. Also there may be some Vets that play this game that was shell shocked during their tour. It annoy them more then us normal players

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I want them to record Andrew Dice Clay saying "Badda BOOM!" and have that be the citadel noise.

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It used to be a hell of a lot more annoying before they changed it last year.

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I want the cit sound to be Little Richard going "POW!"

 

This would be awesome, you know it would. :trollface:

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Had someone's oxy-acet torch pop and then whistle beside my left ear as I was reaching down for my striker today. Two hours later it's still ringing and yes, it sounded like I was hit in the citadel.

 

If anyone wants to complain about the citadel hit sound, I suggest you go hear a loud bang/pop next to your ear, and then come back.

 

as someone who has worked with these oxy-acetylene torchs before in my few years of Welding college, i can say yes, they are loud and they will startle you every time, its also very dangerous when the whistle comes in as that means the fuel/gas could be going back up into the torch and eventually back into the gas cylinder itself and we all know what happens when theres fire and gas in a small compacted area

 

Edited by tcbaker777

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Had someone's oxy-acet torch pop and then whistle beside my left ear as I was reaching down for my striker today. Two hours later it's still ringing and yes, it sounded like I was hit in the citadel.

 

If anyone wants to complain about the citadel hit sound, I suggest you go hear a loud bang/pop next to your ear, and then come back.

 

Had my friend negligently fire his .45acp pistol less than two feet from my left ear. In doors. In my kitchen.

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I don't think any of us should have to feel physical discomfort while trying to play a game.

Glad they changed it from the even worse previous ear ringing/headache inducing sound.  Now it's tolerable.

Edited by Jinxed_Katajainen

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Had my friend negligently fire his .45acp pistol less than two feet from my left ear. In doors. In my kitchen.

 

You mean ex-friend, right? 

 

A friend of my went RA after high school way back in the 70's... claims they were on a firing range where a DI was saying the regular rigmarole about loaded weapons, yadda yadda.... "and never, ever should you do this.." He had the 45 in front of him at an angle that happened to be pointing at a soldier's chest. He pulled the slide back and dropped it - with his finger holding the trigger down.

 

Boom. Dead soldier. One new lifetime member for Ft. Leavenworth. Two lives totally wasted.

 

The DI had been doing it for so long he apparently believed the weapon was unloaded. It was not.  

Edited by Herr_Reitz

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I have had tinnitus a very long time, so I use a headset with a speaker only over the unaffected ear.  

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It's a strange element of realism they're trying to capture- and I'm not sure that anyone ever said it wasn't realistic. They just don't like it. We can turn that fire effect down- people who want to turn off the "additional citadel / significant hit" effect should be able to.

 

I personally hate it- but not because it's not accurate or... reflecting some element of realism. I just hate it because it means I just got owned. 

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Iirc many of the people complaining suffer from chronic tinnitus making the sound worse for them while most of us aren't bothered by it.

 

Only a small percentage of those - had tinnitus for as long as I can remember - 6-7 years old and the old one did not bother me.  New one really does not bother me at all.  I have to use a fan at night to sleep...

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The point of this is...?

 

The tinnitis ringing has been gone from the heavy damage sound for nearly a year now.

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Tinnitus is a very interesting neurological phenomenon. I had a professor at my university who was doing research on tinnitus with DARPA and DoD funding, as it is a common affliction for many servicemembers and veterans.

 

In your cochlea, the pressure waves in the air that sound represents is converted to mechanical motion of the basilar membrane of the organ of Corti. This mechanical motion physically opens channels in the hair cells, which then have action potentials fire. The resulting signal travels down the cochlear nerve, which then joins the vestibular nerve to form the vestibulocochlear nerve (funny how the naming system works haha), traveling to the brainstem, the thalamus, and then finally the auditory cortex.

 

There are large portions of the brain dedicated to the processing of auditory signals, but suffice it to say that you perceive sound when the neurons in the auditory cortex say so. In the case of noise induced hearing loss (usual cause of tinnitus), the hair cells are literally torn to shreds by the incredibly violent movement of the organ of Corti from explosions, loud music, etc, and they never regenerate. There are now no signals from the dead hair cells for these neurons to receive. However, much like how your eyes adjust to the darkness when the light is turned off, the neurons in the auditory cortex begin to focus harder, and harder, and harder, until they begin to finally "perceive" something. They begin to pick up on noise generated by the random opening of ion channels in neurons, noise from radiation interacting with molecules in your cells, etc. It is very similar to the white noise from television in the sense that the signal to noise ratio is extremely low.

 

From then on, you will permanently perceive the noise corresponding to whichever neurons lost input. It can be crippling, preventing sleep and interfering with activities of daily living. People have been driven to suicide by it. For a long time, people thought there was cure. How could you stop it? These neurons are doing what they were essentially born to do! It would be like telling your visual cortex to stop perceiving vision.......

 

There is a well known phenomenon of people who become blind having their visual cortex starting to change what it processes. A portion of the visual cortex tends to eventually process auditory or other inputs instead. The ability for neurons to change in response to changing inputs is known as neural plasticity. A way to purposefully induce neural plasticity in parts of the brain was found when people discovered that stimulating the vagus nerve caused the amygdala, a part of the brain associated with emotional learning to activate and greatly enhance memory retention.

 

With further study it was found that not only memory (a form of neural plasticity) could be affected by vagal nerve stimulation, but also the auditory cortex. Right now, studies are being done to look at the potential to change the function of the auditory neurons responsible for the tinnitus, in the process eliminating the perception of the sound. There is now a real cure for tinnitus visible in the near future!

 

None of this would have been possible were it not for the basic science which lead up to this finding. Please support research funding. Without private and especially public  funding from the NIH, we would have never made it this far. Remember, Trump and the Republican Congress is hellbent on slashing the funding of NIH, NIST, and other government bodies that fund research.

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Tinnitus is a very interesting neurological phenomenon. I had a professor at my university who was doing research on tinnitus with DARPA and DoD funding, as it is a common affliction for many servicemembers and veterans.

 

In your cochlea, the pressure waves in the air that sound represents is converted to mechanical motion of the basilar membrane of the organ of Corti. This mechanical motion physically opens channels in the hair cells, which then have action potentials fire. The resulting signal travels down the cochlear nerve, which then joins the vestibular nerve to form the vestibulocochlear nerve (funny how the naming system works haha), traveling to the brainstem, the thalamus, and then finally the auditory cortex.

 

There are large portions of the brain dedicated to the processing of auditory signals, but suffice it to say that you perceive sound when the neurons in the auditory cortex say so. In the case of noise induced hearing loss (usual cause of tinnitus), the hair cells are literally torn to shreds by the incredibly violent movement of the organ of Corti from explosions, loud music, etc, and they never regenerate. There are now no signals from the dead hair cells for these neurons to receive. However, much like how your eyes adjust to the darkness when the light is turned off, the neurons in the auditory cortex begin to focus harder, and harder, and harder, until they begin to finally "perceive" something. They begin to pick up on noise generated by the random opening of ion channels in neurons, noise from radiation interacting with molecules in your cells, etc. It is very similar to the white noise from television in the sense that the signal to noise ratio is extremely low.

 

From then on, you will permanently perceive the noise corresponding to whichever neurons lost input. It can be crippling, preventing sleep and interfering with activities of daily living. People have been driven to suicide by it. For a long time, people thought there was cure. How could you stop it? These neurons are doing what they were essentially born to do! It would be like telling your visual cortex to stop perceiving vision.......

 

There is a well known phenomenon of people who become blind having their visual cortex starting to change what it processes. A portion of the visual cortex tends to eventually process auditory or other inputs instead. The ability for neurons to change in response to changing inputs is known as neural plasticity. A way to purposefully induce neural plasticity in parts of the brain was found when people discovered that stimulating the vagus nerve caused the amygdala, a part of the brain associated with emotional learning to activate and greatly enhance memory retention.

 

With further study it was found that not only memory (a form of neural plasticity) could be affected by vagal nerve stimulation, but also the auditory cortex. Right now, studies are being done to look at the potential to change the function of the auditory neurons responsible for the tinnitus, in the process eliminating the perception of the sound. There is now a real cure for tinnitus visible in the near future!

 

None of this would have been possible were it not for the basic science which lead up to this finding. Please support research funding. Without private and especially public  funding from the NIH, we would have never made it this far. Remember, Trump and the Republican Congress is hellbent on slashing the funding of NIH, NIST, and other government bodies that fund research.

 

Good! I have it in both ears. Too much gunfire and crap blowing up, helicopter engines and some help from Testament, Judas Priest, Metallica, etc............

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I have crickets living in my ears since I was 8. I sleep in the dead of winter with the soothing sounds of summer camp near the lake. But That said I say WHAT a whole lot .

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I have crickets living in my ears since I was 8. I sleep in the dead of winter with the soothing sounds of summer camp near the lake. But That said I say WHAT a whole lot .

 

LLLOLLL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Me too!

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