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alphonse2501

(Youtube) How hard the Japanese (writing) is?

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I recommend captains (weeaboo or not) to see these videos for understanding why Japanese is hard to learn:

 

The Hardest Writing System! - an animated rant about learning Japanese

 

Kanji Story - How Japan Overloaded Chinese Characters

 


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Try learning to speak mandarin. Much less Cantonese. Mandarin characters were adopted by the Japanese in the Heian period and simplified. Mandarin is even more of a bear than Japanese


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Try learning to speak mandarin. Much less Cantonese. Mandarin characters were adopted by the Japanese in the Heian period and simplified. Mandarin is even more of a bear than Japanese

 

At least Japanese language has the alphabetic portion to fall back on...you just forge ahead with all those fancy picture characters when it's Chinese, and I find that much tougher. Still don't comprehend how a friend of mine could do it (I did Japanese while he did Chinese)

The real problem lies in when you have to do it on paper...

 

Though I must say that being trained in both in different degrees at different times the knowledge from both sides help each other in various parts...


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Posted (edited) · Report post

In modern times, Japan tried to simplify and modernize their Chinese characters, and the People's Republic of China did the same. Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore retain Traditional.

 
Edited by Eisennagel

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I have Found Modern Japanese to be a lot easier to read than Any form of Chinese lol.


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Try learning to speak mandarin. Much less Cantonese. Mandarin characters were adopted by the Japanese in the Heian period and simplified. Mandarin is even more of a bear than Japanese

 

Try Cantonese... Mandarin with even more tones! 

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Try Cantonese... Mandarin with even more tones! 

 

Mandarin has 5 tones... Cantonese has at least 8

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I speak Japanese (well first language). SO its kinda cool to see the struggles I seem to be easy but not for people who don't speak.


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Posted (edited) · Report post

Try learning to speak mandarin. Much less Cantonese. Mandarin characters were adopted by the Japanese in the Heian period and simplified. Mandarin is even more of a bear than Japanese

 

 

Mandarin is just a subset of Chinese.  What you see as characters are Chinese characters, not Mandarin characters, as these are used with the Chinese dialects, Wu (Shanghainese), Min (Hokkien), Yue (Cantonese), Hakka and Gan.  Mandarin didn't come into prominence until the medieval period which is around the Yuan and Ming dynasties.  At the time Chinese was being adopted into the Japanese language, the form was more ancient, starting with the Wu Kingdom, but most importantly from the Tang Dynasty.  Contrary to how modern Chinese movies would portray it, people speak differently at the time of the Han and the Tang dynasties, than they did on Yuan, Ming and Qing Dynasties, where its more recognizable as Mandarin.  The ancient Chinese tongue is likely much more recognizable to the Wu, Yue and Min speakers.  

 

One of the characteristics of Ancient Chinese vs. Modern Chinese is that Ancient Chinese had -p, -t, and -k endings on the words, which were all gone in a later period.  -t endings are changed to -chi ending in Japanese, for example;

 

For the number one

 

Mandarin -- yi

Ancient -- it 

Japanese -- ichi, itsu

Amoy - it, chit

Canton - yat

Shanghai - yet

 

 

Edited by Eisennagel

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I think IJN may have had their own made up Kanji.

 

Like, cutter boat is this

cutter_zpsamya6hiz.png

 


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I have Found Modern Japanese to be a lot easier to read than Any form of Chinese lol.

 

Learning  close to 100 basic Characters in an alphabet makes  it tough to pick up, But Once you get the alphabet down Its a fairly easy language to read. There are only a few grammar rules that change how words are pronounced. And even then they have more to do with formality than actual rules. 

 

Granted Kanji is an entirely Different beast. But many places will have the Hirogana written above Kanji to help with that. 

Edited by Sonoskay

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Writing Chinese characters requires knowing the stroke order for each of them.  Which is a lot.  The general rule is start from top to bottom, then left to right.

 

Unfortunately, the PRC, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan have their own prescribed stroke orders set by their educational bureaus and ministries.  These also differ from the Traditional or Imperial stroke order done in pre-Republic dynastic China especially by notable calligraphers.

 

 


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Writing Chinese characters requires knowing the stroke order for each of them.  Which is a lot.  The general rule is start from top to bottom, then left to right.

 

Unfortunately, the PRC, Japan, Hong Kong and Taiwan have their own prescribed stroke orders set by their educational bureaus and ministries.  These also differ from the Traditional or Imperial stroke order done in pre-Republic dynastic China especially by notable calligraphers.

 

 

 

This also includes the expression mentality behind calligraphy-dō

 

Energetic flicks that express the symbol or Restrained flicks that express the symbol...

which is it, seriously  :nerv_fish:


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This also includes the expression mentality behind calligraphy-dō

 

Energetic flicks that express the symbol or Restrained flicks that express the symbol...

which is it, seriously  :nerv_fish:

 

 

Depends on what kind of Shifa that is being practiced.  Many calligraphers today also try to do the old Imperial scripts as well as the cursive running, semi-cursive, and the cursive sloppy.  They won't follow the educational bureau stroke order but instead, try to do the stroke orders used in the older scripts.

 

Still in use today.

 

Clerical Script --- One of the oldest, this was authorized by Shi Huang Di of the Qin Dynasty

 

Gn1zPIH.jpg

 

Regular Script. Probably the best established and best known.  Said to be authorized at the Wei Dynasty or Cao Wei, maybe by Cao Cao himself.

 

LrUbN9j.jpg

 

Semi Cursive

 

pBwS2Cr.jpg

 

Grass or Cursive Sloppy Script.  This started during the Han Dynasty.  There is also something called Modern Cursive which isn't the same.

 

MJuwLD1.jpg

 

Edited by Eisennagel

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Cursive or Grass Style is referred to as Cao Shu.  Cursive style is the inspiration for Hiragana and Simplified Chinese characters.

 

lb3Mu6Q.jpg

 

HOunP8K.jpg


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