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Color Pics of Katori-class, Sendai-class, Agano-class, and Ōyodo. (Image heavy)

Which colorized pictures do you want to see next?  

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  1. 1. Choose below!

    • Japanese Submarines
      6
    • Japanese Destroyers 1 (1900-WWI)
      1
    • Japanese Destroyers 2 (Minekaze, Kawakaze, Kamikaze, and Mutsuki)
      6
    • Japanese Destroyers 3 (Fubuki (Special Types 1 & 2), Asashio, and Shiratsuyu)
      10
    • Royal Hellenic Navy (Greek Navy)
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    • Royal Thai Navy
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    • The Battle of Iwo Jima
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Hi guys! Here's part 2 of the IJN light cruisers. Due to the number of pictures, this will require a comment for the rest of the pictures. As per the norm, the pictures can be found here: http://blog.livedoor.jp/irootoko_jr/

Let's get this show on the seas!

 

 

 

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We start off with the training light cruiser, Katori, she was named after a shrine of the same name. We catch her here at sunset at Saiki Bay in September 1941. Her career was an eventful and damaging one: On Feb 1, 1942, she was anchored at Kwajalein Atoll when torpedo bombers from USS Enterprise (CV-6) attacked and damaged her; During the Attack on Truk on Feb 17-18, 1944, she came under air attack again from 4 fleet carriers and one light carrier, she was hit by a torpedo but it did minor damage. However her luck ran out several hours later when USS New Jersey (BB-62) and USS Iowa (BB-61) spotted her and opened fire; the screening US destroyers fired 6 salvos of torpedoes at Katori but they all missed, Katori responded in kind but missed as well. At a range of 14,500 yds, Iowa closed with Katori and fired 46 16-inch high capacity (non-armor-piercing) shells and 124 5-inch, straddling the cruiser with eight salvos. CAG 17/A16-3 reports Iowa hits Katori with her second salvo. Just after Iowa's forth salvo, Katori quickly listed to port exposing seven large shell holes about 5 feet in diameter in her starboard side, one under the bridge about five feet below the waterline another amidships about at the waterline, plus about nine small holes. The damage on the port side was much worse. After being under attack by Iowa for only 11 minutes, Katori sank stern first, with a port side list about 40 miles northwest of Truk.

 

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A Kawanishi E7K2 Type 94 recon float plane aboard a Katori-class. This particular model had about 350 built and was used from 1935-1943.

 

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Kashima, pictured at Yokohama in May 1940. She presents us with an excellent starboard beam view of her underway at low speed. Kashima managed to survive the war and was refitted as a repatriation transport.

 

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The final of the Katori-class, Kashii, pictured at Seletar Singapore on September 1, 1942. She was mostly used as a troop and supply transport until late 43. She was later sunk with 602 of her crew by US torpedo and divebomber aircraft.

 

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We now get to the first of the improved Nagara-class, Sendai, lead ship of her class. Nothing much different to say about their design other than the Sendais have 4 stacks instead of 3. She was a part of the lopsided Battle of Empress Augusta Bay; Shigure spotted the US forces and turned hard starboard to fire 8 torpedoes, Sendai followed suit but bore down on Shigure, barely avoiding a collision with her. Immediately following all four of the US cruisers (USS Cleveland (CL-55), USS Colombia (CL-56), USS Montpelier (CL-57), and USS Denver (CL-58)) took her under radar directed fire hitting her with their first salvo and several more after, setting her ablaze. Sendai sank the following morning along with Hatsukaze.

 

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In this picture we see Sendai, and Hatsuharu at Suonada on February 26, 1939.Z56OabG.jpg

A closeup shot during the same day of Sendai's center and stern superstructure. Many things are here to see but I'll note the forward torpedo tubes which, at least on Sendai face the stern; and the smaller 2 and 4 funnels.

 

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The second of the class, Jintsū, pictured underway at speed on her sea trials at Satamisaki on November 13,1939. She was part of the Battle of Kolombangara where she led 5 destroyers in an attack on a US and NZ light cruiser and destroyer force. She led a night torpedo attack and illuminated the allied ships with her searchlights. This proved to be fatal just like Akatsuki at Guadalcanal, as USS Honolulu (CL-48), USS St. Louis (CL-49), and HMNZS Leander hit her with at least 10 6 inch shells fired by radar and setting her ablaze. She broke in two and sank 18 hours later.

 

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Jintsū pictured in 1932 at anchor and light load. She still has yet to lose her flying off platform above her front guns.

 

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The last of the Sendai-class, Naka, pictured at Kure, 1933. Naka lead a destroyer squadron during the Battle of the Java Sea, the squadron fired their torpedoes but failed to hit anything. Later in life she assisted Agano after her submarine attack but was later sunk during Operation Hailstone by aircraft from USS Bunker Hill (CV-17) and USS Cowpens (CVL-25).

 

 

Continued below with the Agano-class, and Ōyodo...

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Agano, the first of the new IJN light cruisers, at Truk Atoll on December 7, 1942. They were very good looking cruisers and much better designed for the rigors of combat in WWII with centerline mounted quad torpedo launchers; a main battery that elevated to 55 degrees; and 2 modern float planes for recon. Agano was a part of the battles for Guadalcanal and the Solomon Islands. She was ordered home from Rabaul after being heavily damaged by USS Saratoga (CV-3) and USS Princeton (CVL-23), and was later sunk at Truk by USS Skate (SS-305).

 

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Noshiro, the second of the Agano-class, pictured on sea trials at Tokyo Bay in June, 1943. This picture gives a better view of the middle superstructure of the Aganos and shows her running at speed.

 

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Yahagi, the most well known of the class, on sea trials at Sasebo, December 19, 1943. This shot gives an excellent port beam view showing off the full ship.

 

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Yahagi under attack during Operation Ten-Ichi-Go, April 7, 1945. Yahagi has two bombs near miss her as a bomber which just missed her takes a picture of the stricken cruiser; she would be sunk later that day by some 7 torpedoes and a dozen bombs.

 

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Sakawa, the final Agano, after her surrender at Sasebo in September, 1945. Her service was being a transport for troops from New Guinea and other areas of the war. She was later a target in the Bikini Atoll bomb tests.

 

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A demilitarized Sakawa at Yokosuka in 1946. For US forces, a helpful English name was painted on her beam.

 

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Finally we get to the last light cruiser built by the IJN, Ōyodo. Built for commanding submarine operations, Ōyodo was a part of a variety of missions ultimately becoming the flagship of the Combined Fleet before being sunk at port in Kure on July 28, 1945.

 

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A good port bow shot of Ōyodo at Yokosuka in April, 1944. She had 2 triple 15.5 cm/60 cal 3rd Year Type naval guns taken from the Mogami-class heavy cruisers. She also had far better long range AA owing to the 4 dual 10 cm/65 cal Type 98 AA guns.

 

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In the aftermath of the Battle of Cape Engaño, part of the larger Battle of Leyte Gulf, Ōyodo comes alongside Zuikaku the flagship of the combined fleet to take on survivors as she sinks; October 25, 1944.

 

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A Kawanishi E15K Shiun Model 11. This recon float plane was designed for use aboard Ōyodo, but only saw limited service as the float failed to detach on activation.

 

 

 

And that's all for the light cruisers of the IJN, I hope you enjoyed! New poll above for which series you want to see next. And as always:

Fair winds and following seas captains! :honoring:

 

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For the pic of cruiser Sendai February 26, 1939, the destroyer most likely in the picture is Hatsushimo, destroyer of the 2nd Fleet of Japan and one of the Hatsuharu-class.

derp

 

It's Hatsuharu herself, after some help from KTcraft.

Edited by Unabletony

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For the pic of cruiser Sendai February 26, 1939, the destroyer most likely in the picture is Hatsushimo, destroyer of the 2nd Fleet of Japan and one of the Hatsuharu-class.

derp

 

It's Hatsuharu herself, after some help from KTcraft.

 

Thank you, I'll update the post to reflect that.

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i hope at some point the Agano class is added; im super fond of the japanese cruisers(esp my precious yubari) and would love to try their light line. I imagine this is a mix of a yubari and a leander.... right?

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