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dylan88jr

why do ships just stop instantly after dead

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like why cant i ram that ship that i was literally 1 ft away from after i died why does my ship just stop.

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you must be new, lads, lets take this lad on a adventure of knowledge

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Oh—Oh! I know! 

 

I'm pretty sure it's because the animation of a sinking ship is fixed to the location at which it is sinking. This is easier than having a program calculate an accurate looking sinking ship in real-time as it's affected by the environment around it, since such a process would be taxing on the lower end computers, especially when considering that there might be multiple ships sinking at the same time. If all of them were uniquely disturbed by the environment around them, then that would mean that the program would have to run on multiple layers—Influencing things like depth, tilt, speed, momentum, spin, and movement in ways determined solely by the other programs running concurrently alongside it.     

 

It's much simpler and easier to simply create a few different animations for a sinking ship, and having those play in pre-determined manners. It cuts away all the complex and superfluous bits, while making a sinking ship look damn good. In addition, the interactions of a live 'sinking program' with it's environment might result in unexpected and somewhat silly bugs. Heck, even with copy and paste animations, it's been observed that ships sometimes do not...behave as intended. Even animation programs designed to fit each sinking situation can go hay-wire it seems, to say nothing of what would happen with a more complex program and process.   

 

So, with this animation, the devs had to make sure that nothing too strange and logic bending would happen. I'm guessing that they largely fixed the animation to a single reference point, so that it plays out in a believable manner when sinking.  

Therefore, the animation must play itself out in the same spot for it's entire duration, meaning that your ship cannot influence the process of the program playing out. Ergo, you can't move a sinking ship. I think.  

 

At least, this is my guess.  

  • Cool 8

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Oh—Oh! I know! 

 

I'm pretty sure it's because the animation of a sinking ship is fixed to the location at which it is sinking. This is easier than having a program calculate an accurate looking sinking ship in real-time as it's affected by the environment around it, since such a process would be taxing on the lower end computers, especially when considering that there might be multiple ships sinking at the same time. If all of them were uniquely disturbed by the environment around them, then that would mean that the program would have to run on multiple layers—Influencing things like depth, tilt, speed, momentum, spin, and movement in ways determined solely by the other programs running concurrently alongside it.     

 

It's much simpler and easier to simply create a few different animations for a sinking ship, and having those play in pre-determined manners. It cuts away all the complex and superfluous bits, while making a sinking ship look damn good. In addition, the interactions of a live 'sinking program' with it's environment might result in unexpected and somewhat silly bugs. Heck, even with copy and paste animations, it's been observed that ships sometimes do not...behave as intended. Even animation programs designed to fit each sinking situation can go hay-wire it seems, to say nothing of what would happen with a more complex program and process.   

 

So, with this animation, the devs had to make sure that nothing too strange and logic bending would happen. I'm guessing that they largely fixed the animation to a single reference point, so that it plays out in a believable manner when sinking.  

Therefore, the animation must play itself out in the same spot for it's entire duration, meaning that your ship cannot influence the process of the program playing out. Ergo, you can't move a sinking ship. I think.  

 

At least, this is my guess.  

Post #4 explains it better!

 

But +1 for both off you lol.

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Oh—Oh! I know! 

 

I'm pretty sure it's because the animation of a sinking ship is fixed to the location at which it is sinking. This is easier than having a program calculate an accurate looking sinking ship in real-time as it's affected by the environment around it, since such a process would be taxing on the lower end computers, especially when considering that there might be multiple ships sinking at the same time. If all of them were uniquely disturbed by the environment around them, then that would mean that the program would have to run on multiple layers—Influencing things like depth, tilt, speed, momentum, spin, and movement in ways determined solely by the other programs running concurrently alongside it.     

 

It's much simpler and easier to simply create a few different animations for a sinking ship, and having those play in pre-determined manners. It cuts away all the complex and superfluous bits, while making a sinking ship look damn good. In addition, the interactions of a live 'sinking program' with it's environment might result in unexpected and somewhat silly bugs. Heck, even with copy and paste animations, it's been observed that ships sometimes do not...behave as intended. Even animation programs designed to fit each sinking situation can go hay-wire it seems, to say nothing of what would happen with a more complex program and process.   

 

So, with this animation, the devs had to make sure that nothing too strange and logic bending would happen. I'm guessing that they largely fixed the animation to a single reference point, so that it plays out in a believable manner when sinking.  

Therefore, the animation must play itself out in the same spot for it's entire duration, meaning that your ship cannot influence the process of the program playing out. Ergo, you can't move a sinking ship. I think.  

 

At least, this is my guess.  

 

The ship can move if pushed by a player. Now whether it goes further than a few inches depends on if it's a destroyer being plowed through by a battleship or if it's a destroyer "plowing through" a battleship...

But fun fact, you can use a sinking ship to block torpedoes from hitting you. And if it's a big enough ship, this can stay true for quite a while. I actually have a sneaking suspicion they have a floor at the bottom of the ocean where the sunk ship models actually rest at for the rest of the game. At least, the data of it. It's not being rendered since you can't see it. But, it was a model generated within the game. I'm constantly getting more and more convinced it's just like World of Tanks: the corpses of the fallen are there, for the entire duration of the match. :sleep_fish: 

 

Edit: I WAS gonna use this as proof, but there is no floor at the "bottom" of the map like I thought there was.... Maybe they do just disappear.... My bad :hiding:

 

 

Anyways, for those who never seen this, enjoy, and for those who played it, enjoy the nostalgia <3

Edited by HoIo

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"of"

 

 

Yes 'of', can only assume I double tapped the f. Thank you.

 

To OP, if you had been the ship about to be rammed I suspect you would have a different take on it continuing on and killing you. It is an established game mechanic. 

 

 

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Yes 'of', can only assume I double tapped the f. Thank you.

 

To OP, if you had been the ship about to be rammed I suspect you would have a different take on it continuing on and killing you. It is an established game mechanic. 

 

 

 

no not really if i let a enemy bb get 1 ft from me before launching my torps to finish him it would be my fault 

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The first time I ever took my Texas out I put a salvo into a flat-on Aoba that was moving at flank to get into cover.  In any case, he was moving at 30+ knots when he blew up and his wreck slid almost a full ship length before it stopped and began to sink.  Mind you, even with that it defied "real world" physics but this is an arcade game.

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Water creates friction in this game, Friction requires a surface to operate on, once you're dead, the water can get inside and have all those lovely internal surfaces to work on, so the ship stops immediately.

 

Note, flooding doesn't really affect the ship's model and performance, just it's hit points, so 'flooding' isn't really letting water into the ship, it just degrades the field that keeps the water out.

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no not really if i let a enemy bb get 1 ft from me before launching my torps to finish him it would be my fault 

Good for you, yet you seem to have a problem with a game mechanic that is well established and your target took full advantage of?

 

Is it the fact your plan to ram didn't work, or is it the actual mechanic? If the mechanic were different I dare say the person who you were trying to ram would also know the ship would continue if destroyed and not waited until you were 1ft away to fire. You would have died earlier.

 

A brave play by them I'd say!

Edited by _WaveRider_

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