Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'overmatch'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • World of Warships - News and Information
    • News And Announcements
    • Updates and PTS
    • Developer's Corner
    • Community Volunteer Programs
  • Feedback and Support
    • Game Support and Bug Reporting
    • Player Feature and Gameplay Suggestions
    • Game Guides and Tutorials
  • General WoWs Discussion
    • General Game Discussion
    • Contests and Competitions
    • Discussions about Warships
    • Player Modifications
  • Off Topic
    • Historical Discussions and Studies
    • Off-Topic
  • International Forums
    • Foro en Español
    • Fórum Brasileiro
  • External testing groups
    • Supertest Academy
    • Supertest
    • Clantest

Calendars

  • World of Warships Events
  • [C-RED] - Code RED's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Discord


Twitter


Website URL


Instagram


YouTube


Twitch


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 3 results

  1. The overmatch mechanic in the game is not something that new or even more seasoned players often think about or even know about when they are in game. It is the first 'check' that is made when you shoot at another ship (or they shoot at you) to determine whether or not your shells will penetrate. That's why it's actually good to know about and consider when positioning your ship for a head to head battle. Overmatch is the term that is used to describe the relative ratio of a shells caliber to the armor it will come into contact with. That ratio is 14.3:1. That means, if the shell is 14.3 or more times greater than the thickness of the armor, regardless of angle, it will penetrate. For low tier ships this is not too important to know about as the bow-in game play is not as relevant due to inexperience and armor tends to be so thin, most cruisers can overmatch other cruisers. At mid to high tiers, however, (tier 5+) players start to learn the advantages of being bow in from more experienced players on their team. This is also where there are far more distinct lines between ship armor thickness and gun caliber. Most cruisers after tier 5 have bow armor that exceeds 13mm, meaning that with few exceptions only battleships can overmatch their bows and not other cruisers as most cruisers between tier 5-7 are boasting 152mm guns; 13mm is overmatched by 186+mm guns. As you progress down the cruiser lines your bow armor will get thicker, usually from 13mm to 16mm and typically topping out at 25mm at tier 8. Battleships on the other hand, have bow armor at about 19mm at tier 5 and typically top out at 32mm at tier 8. Of course there are exceptions to this, such as the German BB's who tend to have this thickest bow armor with plating. The thickest is actually the tier 5 Konig with 150mm plating on its bow. Though there are areas of the bow with 19mm, the majority of the bow, specifically providing cover for the citadel, is 150mm. This means that a tier 5 battleship can actually bow tank every ship in the game under most scenarios. Further, due to the larger caliber of guns on battleships, and heavier armor overall, there is more of a propensity so go bow in against another battleship. This is where the overmatch mechanic is really worth understanding. The only 2 ships, per WarGaming's design, that are capable of overmatching the bow of (nearly) every ship are the Yamato and Mushashi with their 460mm guns; the largest guns in the game. Therefore, going bow in against them is ill advised. The only ships that are theoretically able to go bow in against them are the Kurfurst and the Frederick der Grosse as they have 60mm plating on their bows. Though there are places where the armor is only 32mm, the thickness that 460mm guns can overmatch, much like the Konig, this plating will prevent frontal citadels under most circumstances. Both cruisers and battleships are capable of bow tanking ships of the same type and tier. Knowing who can you go face to face with can be critical in certain battles, especially in competitive play. Once again, this is a particularly common tactic among battleships but cruisers can do it as well. For those that wish to know if you can be overmatched or overmatch a certain ship simply divide the ships gun caliber by 14.3. If your armor thickness is greater than that, you're good, if not, find another tactic. Similarly, you can multiply your armor thickness by 14.3 to find out the minimum caliber of gun required to overmatch your bow. Finally, if you don't know any of this info or just don't want to worry about doing the math, I've created a Google Sheet than can do the calculations for you or you can look up the ships by name. A disclaimer for this calculator though is I have not included clone ships, such as any of the ARP ships, which are clones of the Myoko and the Kongo. You can find the link below. If you have any trouble with it, find errors, or have some suggestions for improvement, please let me know. Bow In Calculator
  2. TLDR at the end :) After taking a good look at Queen Elizabeth's bow armor in the client and external websites, I noticed a good section of 104 mm bow armor quite near up front. Theoretically, if you could angle and bounce shells with the 104 mm section, you'll be pretty much be able to tank any BB ap for a good amount of time. To test this, I tried taking out my QE out for a spin in the training room against a Kremlin (LOL). The Kremlin has 457 mm shells that can overmatch QE's external plating of 26 mm but definitely not the 104 mm section. In the training room, I discovered that I managed to bounce around half of his AP. Most of the AP that bounced was on the main belt armor near the center of the ship. There were several occasions where the AP bounced when it hit the bow but most of the them resulted in regular penetrations. There was one citadel hit during the test but that was when I overturned and pointed my bow straight on when the AP hit. As the test progressed, I took less penetration damage to my bow due to damage saturation mechanics. I ended up taking a total of 93k damage after using 5 heals. Most of the damage was fire damage from his secondaries and the regular pens from his AP. I took 88 hits from his AP shells, with the damage averaging less than 1k per shell. I did get my main turret disabled a few times as a result of a penetration hitting the turret barbette area. After the test, I took a closer look in the armor viewer and made some notes. There are two sections to the bow armor I circled and examined. Both of them are 104 mm and located at the waterline. So although you may be technically angled, a shell could pass above the 104 mm section and deal damage. Section A (Red) This section of bow armor cannot bounce BB shells if you angle properly because shells will probably pen this area and hit something else. This means that this section of armor will not protect you from AP shells if you are bow on to an enemy BB. I noted in green arrows the possible path an AP shell could go. If an AP shell hit the bow head on, it could very well hit the citadel (the top boxy thing I outlined in red). Even though this section of armor will be penned most of the time, if you angle you reduce the probability of an AP shell hitting your citadel. I noted that approximately from 0-25 degrees from the centerline of the bow, the path of the AP shell will hit the citadel. Beyond that, it will miss the citadel. This is assuming that the AP shell hits section A of the armor and penetrates. Section B (Blue) This section of bow armor is actually useful. Since it extends a significant amount towards the bow, you find that you get overmatched less often than most battleships with fragile bows. The armor is at such an angle that it will bounce shells up to 15 degrees off the centerline of the bow. Once you go past 15 degrees, shells will start penning that section of armor. However there is a slight overlap in angling between section A and B. If you angle beyond 25 degrees, any shell that strikes section A will miss the citadel. However with the same angling, any shell that strikes section B of the armor will have a good chance of hitting your citadel. Considering that section B of the armor covers a significant amount of the bow, it is better to angle 15 degrees from the centerline of the bow to minimize getting citadeled. TLDR: Queen Elizabeth has a section of 104 mm bow armor that can technically bounce any AP shell in the game. This armor can be abused and you can tank a Yamato in this thing (not that she would ever meet one) There is no specific angle the Queen Elizabeth can take while approaching bow on without a chance of getting overmatched and citadelled. If you angle around 15 degrees from the center of the bow, you make it darn hard for other ships to overmatch your bow. Even though it is possible to be overmatched at this angle, it is very hard for enemy ships to do so and hit your citadel consistently I tried doing this in Training Room and managed to sink a Yamato while bouncing his AP on that 104 mm section. I simply angled 15 degrees and bounced his AP which gave me time to slowly chip away the Yamato's hp and eventually sink him. I'm not an expert at this kind of stuff so if something is up feel free to correct me :)
  3. Hey everyone! As I progress further in the game I have some questions about mechanics. I've done some reading on the forums but a lot of the posts on the subject are old and in some cases I don't fully understand them. Just wondering if someone can offer some advice/clarification and/or check my understanding is correct. Sigma: a value not shown in the game's ship stats the determines how likely shells/salvos are to land towards the middle of the dispersion circle/ellipse. If we think of horizontal dispersion (shown in-game) as the x axis and vertical dispersion (estimated based on shell speed and firing arc) as the y axis, this shows how likely a shell is to land in the middle of that ellipse vs towards the edges. This concept I feel like I have a fairly good grasp of. Angling: I understand that you want to angle your ship. The simple part of this is that by angling yourself towards/away from incoming fire you make yourself a thinner target and reduce the exposure of your broadside, making your ship harder to hit. This makes the wider dispersion of larger enemy ships like BB's work more in your favour. Where things start to get hairy is.... Autobounce angle: I understand that shells fired from a narrow angle are more likely to ricochet. If we call the bow 0°, what exactly defines a narrow angle? Something like +/-15-30°? What is this mythical autobounce angle where every shell that hits you will supposedly ricochet, and what are some tips to put this to practical use when playing? Is there something in the user interface to help with this? I've found I can occasionally bounce shells, but want to know how to do it predictably and repeatably. Overmatch: As I understand it this is related to autobounce but I don't fully understand the relationship. From what I can tell it seems to be that really large guns (like many BB guns) can penetrate clean through thin armour (like bow armour on a CA) without arming, then arm when they hit the citadel armour, fully penetrate the citadel armour, and then get citadel hits. I've heard this is why you don't want to drive straight at anything with big guns, because these shots hit your deck/bow armour and go right through, but I don't know if that's true. Can I somehow use angling to stop these hits? If so how, and what's the relation to the autobounce angle? On the flip side, if I'm driving a BB how do I know when I can overmatch another ship? For context, I'm mostly a DD and CL/CA player and have decent situational awareness so I've found at lower tiers (III-VI) I can often go dark and kite my way out of trouble. At higher tiers not so much, and as I experiment with KM BB's this becomes even more evident. In the BB's I find I'm taking a lot of pen damage even if the turtleback saves me from citadels. It seems I'm either lagging behind and as a result causing little damage, or that I get focus-fired and eat a bunch of pen and fire damage when I push forward to try to get in the action and make myself useful. Any help/advice/clarification is greatly appreciated!
×