Jump to content

1Sherman

Alpha Tester
  • Content Сount

    6,679
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Battles

    3338

Community Reputation

2,072 Superb

About 1Sherman

  • Rank
    Rear Admiral
  • Birthday December 9
  • Insignia

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Socially distanced

Recent Profile Visitors

4,374 profile views
  1. 1Sherman

    Anime moan everytime the ship gets hit

    There's enough thirsty anime stuff in this game as is. People getting off at the sound of a ship moaning luridly whenever it gets hit by giant explosive shells of death is something I'd need to get an extra-large Bonk Stick to deal with.
  2. 1Sherman

    Anime moan everytime the ship gets hit

    That would be cursed as all get out.
  3. 1Sherman

    Wargaming, what on earth is this? - Izumo

    And once you have a computer-based firing system, there's no need for an optical one.
  4. 1Sherman

    Wargaming, what on earth is this? - Izumo

    You've got to be joking. There was no fire control system in WWII better than the Ford Mk 1. You could practically shave the fuzz off a peach with a 16-inch shell from 40 miles out thanks to it.
  5. Edinburgh was carrying gold for another purpose when she sank. Hers was payment from the Soviets as part of the Lend-Lease Act.
  6. 1Sherman

    There is a Fine Line between Courage and Stupidity

    That woman's lucky she didn't end up like Leonardo DiCaprio in The Revenant.
  7. I just found an article on how HMS Emerald, among other ships, was used as part of Operation Fish in 1940 to help transport Britain's gold supplies to Canada in order to keep them out of Nazi hands should Operation Sealion have taken place. It's not much, but I found it quite interesting since I'd never heard about Operation Fish before and I figured there might be a few people here that might want to read it too. Hope you enjoy it! Sincerely, 1Sherman.
  8. Not really, no. What it means is that if the captain gets court-martialed or otherwise is held accountable for the actions they're about to make, he'll make sure to note of anyone who tried to tell him not to in the record that will be used against him in the trial. Essentially, he's offering to make sure the crew isn't punished as well.
  9. 1Sherman

    Forum Game - Word Association

    Marisa Tomei
  10. 1Sherman

    Bold NBA Prediction

    That's what happens when you surround a superstar with a bunch of cardboard cutouts and call them his teammates.
  11. No, that's what the Americans did. The Soviets wouldn't waste a second trying to make anyone think that Germany stood a chance against the might of socialism.
  12. You just answered your own question there, bud. Congratulations.
  13. 1Sherman

    Val vs. Stuka: Who sank more?

    With the Jericho Trumpet, it would've sounded about as terrifying as a dragon too.
  14. You could definitely criticize Nelson's tactics for allowing Victory's T to be crossed, but it still makes for good storytelling because it follows the tried-and-true trope of the hero meeting their end while in the midst of a critical moment that seals their legacy forever. Not only that, but it allows a supporting character to step into the spotlight: Had Redoubtable not engaged Victory, the Fighting Temeraire wouldn't have come to Victory's aid and gotten its place in the history books (and in the annals of great works of art, too). Not only that, but there are other real-life examples of gifted military leaders falling in the midst of a victorious battle. Gustavus Adolphus died in the Battle of Lützen during the Thirty Years' War, but he's still considered the father of modern warfare and the battle was a Protestant victory. James Wolfe's finest hour came at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, the victory that secured British control over Quebec and the rest of the Canadian colonies, but it was also where he died. Even one of the people known sometimes as the "Nelson of the East", Yi Sun-sin, died at the height of the Battle of Noryang, the engagement which finally sealed the fate of the Japanese invasion of Korea and made Yi a national hero. All of them fell due to the inherent unpredictability of battle, something that no amount of tactical or strategic acumen can fully account for, especially in the days and ages they fought in, where communicating orders and organizing forces was significantly harder than it is today. Nelson's maneuverings in the early stages of Trafalgar were brilliant and they got his fleet into position to win, but sooner or later the battle was almost inevitably going to devolve into a close-range donnybrook because that's kinda how battles worked back then, which is what led to Nelson's death. Sooner or later, everyone's luck just runs out. "Nearly" isn't the same as actually hitting the Akagi, now is it? As well, British intelligence about Nagumo's raid was extremely spotty. Even with Somerville's penchant for recklessness, I doubt he would have wanted to risk sending the planes of the Formidable and Indomitable off on a wild goose-chase and potentially leave the carriers vulnerable to attack.
  15. You act as though I don't know this. There's a reason why the cover of Neptune's Inferno is my avatar. What I'm saying is that those following engagements and how the USN trained up for them after the disaster at Savo Island is more interesting, in my opinion, than Savo Island itself. History, in that case, I think has fallen prey to the whims of good storytelling. Unfortunate as it is, it tends to make for better reading to focus on the leadup to the death of a larger-than-life figure and one of the greatest naval commanders of all time than it is to talk about the the people they were up against and the relative lack of drama that followed their exploits. I'm not sure just how it contradicts the Midway narrative. The USN and Royal Navy were two different war machines with different methods, strategies, and tactics, so of course the IJN would fare differently against the two of them. Not only that, but the Hermes didn't have any aircraft on board when it sank, so we really didn't get the chance to see how the Fleet Air Arm would do in battle against the Japanese carrier fleet.
×