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Phoenix_jz

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About Phoenix_jz

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  • Birthday 02/02/1999
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    Ammiraglio di 1ª Divisione Incrociatori Pesanti
    -Italian Heavy Cruiser Ace-
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  1. Hi!

    I've seen your post here:

    that 32,15kg shell weight is more then likely to be the wight of the complete round including propellant charge, not just the shell alone.
    The complete wight of the 120mm/50 Ansalado and OTO guns used as anti surface weapons are 32,85kg
    http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNIT_47-50_m1926.php

    1. Phoenix_jz

      Phoenix_jz

      Hi Tzoli!

       

      I figured, based on the fact that the cartridge is described as 1200mm long (far longer than any Italian 120mm shell would ever be), and the sheer mass.

       

      That being said, I still wonder what the shell mass was. Even for the 'normal' 120mm/50, different sources give varying answers. Navweaps gives 23.15 kg for shell mass, and it's not clear if the 9.7 kg propellant charge is for 950 or 920 mps.

      Campbell's Naval Weapons of WWII gives the same propellant charge (9.7 kg) but only lists 950 mps in it's table, noting the velocity reduction in a note. It lists shell weigh (projectile type not stated) as 23.49 kg.

      As if that wasn't enough disagreement, Italian tables from 1942 list the SAP as 23.25 kg (with a 1.295 kg bursting charge), and the HE as 23.245 kg (with a 1.63 kg bursting charge).

       

      My running hunch is that the shell mass, whichever is correct of the numbers listed above, is probably the same between the two guns, and the propellant charge is what is lower, seeing as the velocity drops to 800 mps.

    2. TZoli_EU

      TZoli_EU

      Most likely as they wished for the gun barrel to last longer reducing the burden on the arms industry. Italian guns were known to have better ballistics and penetration/range then other nations guns in the expense of barrel life.

    3. TZoli_EU

      TZoli_EU

      I've also fixed my drawing a bit as I've drawn the gun barrels too short (more like 40 calibre rather 50) because of the drawing of the turret. The 6m long barrels would end exactly at the end of the gunhouse making reloading very difficult (except if they are side loading ones) so I made them longer to fit in more properly:

      https://www.deviantart.com/tzoli/art/Italian-Destroyer-Design-1939-779653886

       

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