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LittleWhiteMouse

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About LittleWhiteMouse

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  1. LittleWhiteMouse

    Lex TBD Squadron vs Seattle

    So satisfying.
  2. Yep, I totally derped and missed the "last" part. That's what I get for posting while tired. Your observation on the ease of CV-play is misguided. Damage in of itself isn't a good indicator of performance. Without knowing where the damage is being done, it's just a number. One of the reasons carrier damage is high is typically because they (like British battleships) have a bias for engaging battleships (they're easier to hit). And, like British battleships, aircraft carriers do not kill things quickly. This means that targets that can heal will regenerate health requiring MORE damage in order to effectively neutralize them. If it takes you 80,000 damage dealt to sink a 60,000hp battleship, that's not good damage or time management. This is why you will so often see a poor correlation between CV damage totals and their win rates. And yes, part of testing means that I've spent a lot of time testing the air defenses of the tier 8 carriers -- probably more extensively than most. Carrier defense has five layers to it. Flak. Sustained DPS. Fighters. Damage Control. Protection. Flak can largely be ignored -- any veteran CV player with enough experience has already figured workarounds. Sustained DPS is trickier but can be mitigated through speed and slingshot drops. The upcoming speed changes that are currently being tested with emphasize sustained DPS as a defensive measure, but to what extent remains to be seen. Sustained DPS, in some cases, can be quite problematic. In other cases, it's practically a non-issue. Compare the sustained DPS values of the following carriers (Long/Medium/Short sustained DPS): Shokaku: 133 / 0 / 619 Kaga: 133 / 0 / 203 Lexington: 202 / 808 / 256 Saipan: 0 / 396 / 429 Enterprise: 107 / 389 / 783 Graf Zeppelin: 151 / 218 / 218 Implacable: 110 / 724 / 224 Indomitable (WIP): 110 / 284 / 818 The numbers are really quite interesting. Attacking ships like Indomitable or Shokaku will typically only cost you planes after you've already dropped as the planes try and climb away. Ships like Kaga and Graf Zeppelin struggle to shoot down anything at all. Then you get ships like Enterprise and Lexington which have some pretty formidable defenses, especially if the CV player takes a moment to focus their AA defense on the proper vector and applies just enough rudder to make sure attacks don't come down center. Woe betide you if you try and snipe an American CV with four skill points sunk into Manual AA power. Fighters are the next wall you have to contend with. These can be bipassed partially by attacking with the last flight of your attack group (which is generally a good idea when engaging carriers). Otherwise, you have to count on being able to outrun fighters in order to mitigate casualties. This is possible for select aircraft types against certain carriers. Fighter speed isn't fixed and it varies per CV type. Knowing which fighters you can outrun and which ones you can't makes this layer of defense better or worse depending on the match-up. CVs that recognize they're being sniped will often place additional fighters along preferred attack paths to foil attack runs. This can be used to good effect to funnel attacking planes into a particular vector which trivializes focusing AA power as mentioned above. Some carriers have awesome fighters with special properties (Enterprise). Some carriers have really fast fighters that are impossible to outrun (Indomitable's WiP fighters). Other carriers have fighters that are almost completely worthless (Kaga, Graf Zeppelin). Then you have to contend with a CV's damage control. This is active for 60 seconds but it has a 90 second cool down. Timing your attacks to take advantage of this 90s window is paramount for sniping effectively. This largely involves moving your own carrier closer to reduce the flight time between squadrons -- typically getting within 15km to 20km of an enemy carrier. Longer than this and their consumable will come off its reset timer before you can apply the next fire or flood effect. Finally, you have to contend with a ship's own hit point total and armour. The armour value on some carriers makes them nigh impervious to certain attack types -- or at least diminishes their impact such that you're just wasting time trying to snipe the CV with that particular ordnance. Implacable and Indomitable have armoured decks which foils HE bombs and rockets. Enterprise and Implacable have pretty good anti-torpedo protection, effectively nullifying every 3rd or 4th hit by the amount of damage absorbed. Then there's the difference in hit points: Lexington: 57,300 Indomitable (WiP): 54,300 Kaga: 54,200 Graf Zeppelin: 52,600 Implacable: 52,200 Shokaku: 51,400 Enterprise: 51,400 Saipan: 47,900 This is largely what makes bipassing their Damage Control Party consumable so important. Even for a low hit point carrier like Saipan, you could be looking as many as seven or eight attack runs to take it out if you hit it poorly. If you stack on travel time onto this (which is usually in excess of 60s from map border to map border). you could spend half your game ineffectively slapping at the enemy CV before taking it out. Of course, do this well and that CV could go down in as few as three attacks, leaving 3/4s of the game for your team to enjoy without worries of air attack. CVs aren't invulnerable to sniping. The reason most CVs don't do it is that it's not easy and it takes time. The best defense a carrier has isn't those five points I listed -- no, their best defense is usually distance. Who wants to wait through 60s to 70s worth of travel time to dunk on a carrier when that value could be cut almost in half by bombing that battleship / cruiser / destroyer closer to the action?
  3. Why does it make you laugh? Poor aim and poor weapon choice on a given target yields bad results. Good aim and good weapon choice for a given target yields better results. I know it's a fun narrative that CVs are brainless and simple to play, but there's definitely skill elements found throughout. Ignoring that to suit some demonizing narrative undermines any case you're making to advocate change. -edit- Derp, helps if I read. The second last one varies in importance depending upon the carrier. Graf Zeppelin and Kaga, for example, are much more vulnerable to sniping than Enterprise or Lexington.
  4. The irony is that playing CVs well in Co-Op is harder than Randoms. Their game-play stresses making an impact early -- something carriers just cannot do as they generally lack the ability to land meaningful alpha strikes. In this way, they're very much like an American light cruiser playing in Co-Op if you only stick to HE shells.
  5. There are multiple challenges in playing a CV well. If you want to play brainlessly, you can, just like you can do so in just about any ship type. A good example (and probably the closest analogue) are Royal Navy battleships. In those ships, you can mindlessly spam HE and rack up an impressive damage total but you're not going to be too much help to your team simply farming damage off a battleship humping the backline. So to is it with carriers. When you have your choice of targets, farming damage isn't the way to go and it will result in a lot of losses despite high damage totals. Here's the list of challenges for CV players: Expediting the number of attacks per minute. Making effective attacks on targets. Choosing the right targets to engage. Providing vision for your team. Providing effective fighter cover for key allies. Mitigating anti-aircraft damage to your attack flights / squadrons. Managing your aircraft reserves. Positioning your carrier. Protecting your carrier from air attack. Protecting your carrier from surface attack.
  6. LittleWhiteMouse

    Premium Ship Review #125 - Azur Lane Yukikaze

    I checked it. It's the same for all IJN 127mm/50 Type 3 guns.
  7. No harm. People do have it in their head that carriers are attacking them every 30 seconds. It's exceedingly rare to see a carrier average that kind of attack rate over the course of a match. There will be short term exceptions -- like pursuing a carrier (within 12km, for example) and which reduces travel time to almost a non-entity, and being able to repeat drop on an isolated target. The average over the course of the game will never match this though. It's one of the challenges of playing a CV.
  8. So what is this? Well, when dive bombers drop their ordnance, the remaining squadron appears to get a big ol' boost of speed after the fact. It's no secret that some veteran players have been using this increase in speed (and the immunity that comes along with it) to help mitigate damage by flak. I was asked to see if I could find the exact values of the speed and distances provided by this manoeuvre. I used Enterprise's dive bombers to come up with these values. Enterprise's dive bombers have the following speed stats: 125 knot normal speed 100 knot brake speed 175 knot boosted speed Note these values will (probably) change in future patches. TL:DR: Speed boost from the slingshot exists and the numbers are pretty substantial, if short lived. STUPIDLY BIG CAVEAT The times quoted here were obtained using a stopwatch which adds a BIG margin of error to these calculations. Multiple attempts were made to try and isolate this margin of error, but relying on human reflexes in combination of World of Warships' own UI to make these estimations just that -- estimations which could vary +/- by 0.3s. Most of these were collected over a couple of hours (Enterprise attack times were collected previously), so the robustness of these values is understandably suspect. Take them all with a big pinch of salt. Let's go over the phases of a bomb drop without dropping ordnance first. Player begins their attack by clicking their left mouse button. Enterprise's aircraft fly at 125 knots nominally. There is a setup phase as the planes gain altitude (and slow down). Enterprise's 125 knot aircraft reduce to 105 knots during the climb. In Enterprise's case, this setup time takes 2.5s. Planes can now initiate a drop. Planes nose over and dive, briefly accelerating back up to 125 knots and then immediately reducing down to 110 knots through the steepest portion of the dive. As the aircraft level off, they begin accelerating again but will only reach 123 knots by the end of their swoop. Drop phase lasts up to 7 seconds. If ordnance is not dropped, attack flight zoom climbs to rejoin squadron. Speed will max out at 126 knots at the tail end of the swoop before climb initiated. Speed drops to as low as 111 knots during the climb. Rejoining the squadron takes 5 seconds. At the end of this 5 seconds, aircraft are moving at 122 knots. The attack run is considered to have "ended" when ordnance can be dropped a second time. Total distance traveled using stationary Fuso bots as a reference is 3.3km +/- 100m. Using the distance traveled as a measure we can calculate the average horizontal speed. We also know the exact time thanks to the set values for the different phases, giving us a total attack time of 14.5 seconds. EXAMPLE ONE (NO DROP) [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 3,300m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 14.5s [ 3,300m / 5.22 ] /14.5s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~43.599 m/s ] = [ (Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~43.599 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~ 84.7 knots Things get harder to measure when ordnance is dropped, opening up more margins of error. To a player's perception, this is exacerbated by the camera movements. When bombs are dropped, the camera stays behind to follow the ordnance before zooming up to rejoin the squadron. The UI is of no help -- if you watch the speed of the aircraft, it doesn't appear to accelerate beyond the normal speed. 125 knots before the run begins. Slowing down to 105 knots in the climb. Initiating the dive accelerates to 125 knots. Steepest part of the dive is 110 knots with the base of the dive swooping up no faster than 123 knots. This is where our bombs are released. As the camera rejoins the squadron, the airspeed indicator never exceeds 125 knots and actually shows the squadron slowly accelerating up from 120 knots. This implies (to me) that once the bombs are dropped and the attack flight zooms away, the squadron itself is busy trying to accelerate up from the relatively slower speed of the attack pattern back up to normal cruising speed. The drop is simply removing the waiting period of the squadron where the attack flight climbs (at speeds as low as 111 knots) for those 5 seconds. Furthermore, as their flight is level rather than at a climb, this will cover more ground than on a diagonal while gaining altitude. However, this is once again trusting the UI not to be fudging the numbers. For all we know, the UI could be listing the speed of the climbing aircraft. Now, the amount of time spent following the ordnance varies depending on bomb drop height. I was using Enterprise for my tests and it took rough 0.8s from time of release for bombs to hit the water at the lowest altitude and around 3.5s for bombs to hit the water when releasing them from the highest altitude. This changes the attack run time form 14.5s to 15.3s roughly. Thus our attack pattern is now: 2.5 second setup time. Slightly less than 7 seconds attack run time. 0.8s bomb drop time. 5 second recovery time Once again, using stationary Fuso as a measure (with a +/- 100m margin of error due to the UI), we can calculate distance traveled once again by dropping bombs at the very last possible second. For this low drop, the amount of distance traveled was approximately 5km. EXAMPLE TWO: LOW ALTITUDE DROP [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 5,000m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 15.3s [ 5,000m / 5.22 ] /15.3s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~62.605 m/s ] = [ (Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~62.605 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~121.7knots Given the speeds recorded, this average of 121.7 knots is 50% higher than when we don't drop ordnance. This is concerning to me -- a 50% increase means that the squadron has to be moving pretty darned fast to account for that much of a gain. We can verify this by shortening the attack run time and getting rid of all of that swooping and diving nonsense by dropping our bombs immediately. When ordnance is released immediately, the time between the start of the attack and recovery is approximately 11.0s. Mathing it out, this gives us: 2.5 second setup time (this is fixed) ~0.0 seconds attack time (spam clicking LMB to drop bombs as soon as they are available) 5 second recovery time (this is fixed) ~3.5 seconds ordnance drop time. Using our Fuso's as a distance measure, I get a value of roughly 4.5km traveled. Math time: EXAMPLE THREE: HIGH ALTITUDE DROP [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 4,500m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 11s [ 4,500m / 5.22 ] / 11s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~78.370 m/s ] = [ ( Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~78.370 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~152.3 knots Yeah, that's pretty conclusive that some form of artificial boost is occurring, especially given that we know that the aircraft are slowing through the setup time. Now let's see if using the aircraft's own boost through the attack run changes these numbers. For this, I'll be dropping ordnance immediately as per example three. Enterprise's bombers move at 175 knots (for now) when boosted. The amount of distance traveled was ~6.6km over 11s. This distance value is even more uncertain given that the decimal for distance closure at these speeds was sometimes ticking over at 0.2km intervals instead of steadily at 0.1km. So again, big heaping tablespoon of salt for the exact figures listed here. EXAMPLE FOUR: HIGH ALTITUDE DROP + BOOST [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 6,600m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 11s [ 6,600m / 5.22 ] / 11s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~114.943 m/s ] = [ ( Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~114.943 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~223.4 knots So yeah, the boost exists.
  9. Well, it's all going out the window in a patch or two when the aircraft boost / brake speeds get overhauled, so don't get too attached.
  10. TL:DR: Speed boost from the slingshot exists and the numbers are pretty substantial, if short lived. STUPIDLY BIG CAVEAT The times quoted here were obtained using a stopwatch which adds a BIG margin of error to these calculations. Multiple attempts were made to try and isolate this margin of error, but relying on human reflexes in combination of World of Warships' own UI to make these estimations just that -- estimations which could vary +/- by 0.3s. Most of these were collected over a couple of hours (Enterprise attack times were collected previously), so the robustness of these values is understandably suspect. Take them all with a big pinch of salt. Let's go over the phases of a bomb drop without dropping ordnance first. Player begins their attack by clicking their left mouse button. Enterprise's aircraft fly at 125 knots nominally. There is a setup phase as the planes gain altitude (and slow down). Enterprise's 125 knot aircraft reduce to 105 knots during the climb. In Enterprise's case, this setup time takes 2.5s. Planes can now initiate a drop. Planes nose over and dive, briefly accelerating back up to 125 knots and then immediately reducing down to 110 knots through the steepest portion of the dive. As the aircraft level off, they begin accelerating again but will only reach 123 knots by the end of their swoop. Drop phase lasts up to 7 seconds. If ordnance is not dropped, attack flight zoom climbs to rejoin squadron. Speed will max out at 126 knots at the tail end of the swoop before climb initiated. Speed drops to as low as 111 knots during the climb. Rejoining the squadron takes 5 seconds. At the end of this 5 seconds, aircraft are moving at 122 knots. The attack run is considered to have "ended" when ordnance can be dropped a second time. Total distance traveled using stationary Fuso bots as a reference is 3.3km +/- 100m. Using the distance traveled as a measure we can calculate the average horizontal speed. We also know the exact time thanks to the set values for the different phases, giving us a total attack time of 14.5 seconds. EXAMPLE ONE (NO DROP) [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 3,300m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 14.5s [ 3,300m / 5.22 ] /14.5s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~43.599 m/s ] = [ (Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~43.599 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~ 84.7 knots Things get harder to measure when ordnance is dropped, opening up more margins of error. To a player's perception, this is exacerbated by the camera movements. When bombs are dropped, the camera stays behind to follow the ordnance before zooming up to rejoin the squadron. The UI is of no help -- if you watch the speed of the aircraft, it doesn't appear to accelerate beyond the normal speed. 125 knots before the run begins. Slowing down to 105 knots in the climb. Initiating the dive accelerates to 125 knots. Steepest part of the dive is 110 knots with the base of the dive swooping up no faster than 123 knots. This is where our bombs are released. As the camera rejoins the squadron, the airspeed indicator never exceeds 125 knots and actually shows the squadron slowly accelerating up from 120 knots. This implies (to me) that once the bombs are dropped and the attack flight zooms away, the squadron itself is busy trying to accelerate up from the relatively slower speed of the attack pattern back up to normal cruising speed. The drop is simply removing the waiting period of the squadron where the attack flight climbs (at speeds as low as 111 knots) for those 5 seconds. Furthermore, as their flight is level rather than at a climb, this will cover more ground than on a diagonal while gaining altitude. However, this is once again trusting the UI not to be fudging the numbers. For all we know, the UI could be listing the speed of the climbing aircraft. Now, the amount of time spent following the ordnance varies depending on bomb drop height. I was using Enterprise for my tests and it took rough 0.8s from time of release for bombs to hit the water at the lowest altitude and around 3.5s for bombs to hit the water when releasing them from the highest altitude. This changes the attack run time form 14.5s to 15.3s roughly. Thus our attack pattern is now: 2.5 second setup time. Slightly less than 7 seconds attack run time. 0.8s bomb drop time. 5 second recovery time Once again, using stationary Fuso as a measure (with a +/- 100m margin of error due to the UI), we can calculate distance traveled once again by dropping bombs at the very last possible second. For this low drop, the amount of distance traveled was approximately 5km. EXAMPLE TWO: LOW ALTITUDE DROP [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 5,000m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 15.3s [ 5,000m / 5.22 ] /15.3s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~62.605 m/s ] = [ (Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~62.605 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~121.7knots Given the speeds recorded, this average of 121.7 knots is 50% higher than when we don't drop ordnance. This is concerning to me -- a 50% increase means that the squadron has to be moving pretty darned fast to account for that much of a gain. We can verify this by shortening the attack run time and getting rid of all of that swooping and diving nonsense by dropping our bombs immediately. When ordnance is released immediately, the time between the start of the attack and recovery is approximately 11.0s. Mathing it out, this gives us: 2.5 second setup time (this is fixed) ~0.0 seconds attack time (spam clicking LMB to drop bombs as soon as they are available) 5 second recovery time (this is fixed) ~3.5 seconds ordnance drop time. Using our Fuso's as a distance measure, I get a value of roughly 4.5km traveled. Math time: EXAMPLE THREE: HIGH ALTITUDE DROP [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 4,500m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 11s [ 4,500m / 5.22 ] / 11s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~78.370 m/s ] = [ ( Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~78.370 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~152.3 knots Yeah, that's pretty conclusive that some form of artificial boost is occurring, especially given that we know that the aircraft are slowing through the setup time. Now let's see if using the aircraft's own boost through the attack run changes these numbers. For this, I'll be dropping ordnance immediately as per example three. Enterprise's bombers move at 175 knots (for now) when boosted. The amount of distance traveled was ~6.6km over 11s. This distance value is even more uncertain given that the decimal for distance closure at these speeds was sometimes ticking over at 0.2km intervals instead of steadily at 0.1km. So again, big heaping tablespoon of salt for the exact figures listed here. EXAMPLE FOUR: HIGH ALTITUDE DROP + BOOST [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Average Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ 6,600m / 5.22 ] / [ Average Velocity ] = 11s [ 6,600m / 5.22 ] / 11s = [ Average Velocity ] [ ~114.943 m/s ] = [ ( Average Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] ~114.943 m/s * 1.943844= [ Average Speed in knots ] ~223.4 knots So yeah, the boost exists.
  11. 200 knots to 40km is 74.5 seconds. 200 knots to 20km is 37.2 seconds. Math: [ Distance in meters / WoWS Distance Compression Ratio ] / [ Velocity ] = Time in seconds [ Distance in meters / (5.22) ] / [ (Speed in knots) / (Conversion to meters per second) ] = Time in seconds [ Distance in meters / 5.22 ] / [ Speed in knots / 1.943844 ] = Time in seconds When you're a novice CV player, the number to strive is 1 attack run per minute. Yes, really. They don't even have to be successful attack runs -- just making an attempt to put ordnance on target every 60 seconds can be quite the challenge. Some of the best CV players out there will get this number up to 1.5 attack runs per minute or slightly better.
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