Jump to content


October 3 - Focus: USS Lexington and Scharnhorst

Today in WW1 and WW2

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
19 replies to this topic

JeeWeeJ #1 Posted 03 October 2013 - 05:19 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 4,113
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
General

A little change of plan on the "menu" announced yesterday. We were going to cover a Russian ship, but thought it would be a bit disrespectful to another ship that is closer to home on the American server.

Also, this will be a two-parter...as we've used too many pictures. :hiding:


In the meanwhile, here are the usual statistics of the day. You know the drill by now, no submarines nor merchant ships are included in the numbers below. Although labeled "ships", statistics include military ships and boats.


  • 1 German surface ship was launched on October 3 (see 1936 below).  None were launched nor commissioned.
  • 1 Japanese ship was launched: Protected Cruiser Yahagi (1911), and 1 was sunk: Pre-Dreadnough Iki (1915).
  • 20 Allied ships were laid down on an October 3, 49 were launched, and 17 were commissioned. 4 were lost.
  • 1 Italian ship was launched (Torpedo Boat Libra), and 1 was commissioned (Corvette Gabiano) .


1925
  • On October 3, 1925, CV-2, named after Minutemen who fought a detachment of British troops at Lexington, Massachusetts during the Independence War, was launched. USS Lexington was laid down on January 8, 1921, and commissioned on December 14, 1927.

Posted Image


Lady Lex, as she was nicknamed, was the lead ship of her class, originally built as a battlecruiser.  Her conversion was the result of the Washington Treaty of 1922, which cancelled the construction of all battlecruisers and battleships, but authorized their conversion.  Two Lexington-class aircraft carriers would be built: USS Lexington, and USS Saratoga.  The Lexington-class followed the Langley-class and would be followed by the Ranger-class.


Posted Image
Lexington, from battlecruiser to aircraft carrier


Specifications (source: NavSource Online)
Displacement (design): 36,000 tons standard; 38,746 tons
Dimensions (wl): 850' x 105' 5.25" x 24' 3"  /  259.1 x 32.1 x 7.4 meters
Dimensions (max.): 880' x 106'  /  268.2 x 32.3 meters
Armor: 7"-5" belt; 2" protective (3rd) deck; 3" (flat)-4.5" (slopes) over steering gear
Power plant: 16 boilers (300 psi); geared turbines and electric drive; 4 shafts; 180,000 shp (design)
Speed: 33.25+ knots
Endurance (design): 10,000 nautical miles @ 10 knots
Armament: 4 twin 8"/55 gun mounts; 12 single 5"/25 gun mounts
Aircraft: 90
Aviation facilities: 2 elevators; 1 flywheel catapult
Crew: 2,122 (ship's company + air wing)


Not having been originally conceived as an aircraft carrier, Lady Lex had all the luxury and the sins of a battlecruiser.  I’ll let experts discuss the Lexington-class as will, and will focus on Lady Lex.


[Note: Neither the Lexington-class nor the Lexington are covered on this forum...]


After her original sea trials, Lexington was affected to the Pacific fleet, and was stationed in Los Angeles until 1940.


The 1930s saw her participate in many exercises that would eventually dictate the US doctrine on aircraft carriers.  One of them saw her conduct a successful attack on Pearl Harbor on January 31, 1933, without being detected.


On December 5, 1941, Lexington left Pearl Harbor to ferry aircraft meant to strengthen Midway Island defense.  Two days later, she received news of the Japanese attack and was ordered to intercept the attackers.  All reconnaissance flights came back with empty news, and Lexington continued towards Hawaii, which she reached on December 13.


The next day, Lady Lex left for the Marshall Islands, but again, the mission was cancelled, and Lexington was asked to produce air cover for her sister-ship Saratoga, who was tasked with providing some relief to Wake Island.  Both carriers arrived too late, and the island surrendered on December 23.  Not knowing the strength of the Japanese fleet, they sailed back to Hawaii.


Early 1942, Lexington was assigned to a Task Force whose mission was to conduct a surprise raid on Rabaul.    While around 500 miles from Rabaul, the ships were spotted by a lone Mavis flying boat who managed to radio the Task Force’s position before being shot down.  The Japanese reacted by sending some Betty torpedo bombers, their attack failing as no torpedo was available on Rabaul, forcing them to replace them with 250kg bombs.


Battle of the Coral Sea


Again, the focus will be on what happened to the Lexington, rather than the battle itself.  I recommend reading Naval History Heritage, for a good summary, but there are many more detailed books and web sites available to cover it.


Between May 4 and May 8, 1942, the Imperial Japanese Navy started Operation MO, whose goal was to invade both Port Moresby and Tulagi, to provide some defensive bases.  During the first days, each force, composed of 2 aircraft carriers on each side (plus 1 light aircraft carrier for the Japanese), as well as several cruisers and destroyers searched for each other, searched for each other.


On May 7, air strikes from each side targeted enemy aircraft carriers.  That day, aircraft from USS Lexington and USS Yorktown sank the Japanese light carrier Shoho.


The next day, US aircraft also recorded some success and damaged the Japanese aircraft carrier Shokaku.


Posted Image


By  11:00AM on May 8, Japanese aircraft spotted both the Lexington and the Yorktown and started their attack.  The first wave was composed of Kate torpedo bombers.  11 of them managed to clear through the carrier’s air defense, and 2 of their torpedoes hit the Lexington.  The first torpedo jammed the elevators, while the second one ruptured the primary water main, forcing the ship to shut down her boilers, after 3 fire rooms started to flood.   The Kates were soon followed by 19 Vals, who scored what was apparently minor damage, including some cracked avgas tanks.  However, these would prove fatal, as by 12:45, sparks triggered an explosion from the fuel vapors.


Lexington still seemed to be able to survive and continued air operations when 2 hours later, around 2:45, another explosion occurred, eventually followed by another one around 15:25.  All compartments had to be evacuated, and Lexington was forced to stop.  Despite her crew’s effort, the signal to abandon ship was given around 17:00.  While the ship was a total loss, 2,770 of her crew were rescued by other ships of the task force.  Orders were given to the US destroyer Phelps to finish her, which she did with 5 torpedoes. Lady Lex sank around 20:00.


Posted Image


Her sacrifice was not in vain.  The Japanese losses at the Battle Coral Sea would weigh in a subsequent battle: Midway.



Recommended reading: USS Lexington


Sources: NavSource, naval History Heritage, Wikipedia


Battle of the Coral Sea



"In Russia Vodka makes everything out of anything." - KGB - proof of awesome devs
"Oh no, you've got it wrong. It's not "everyone", it's about JeeWeeJ, the impersonation of evil on this forums..." - Ariecho


JeeWeeJ #2 Posted 03 October 2013 - 05:20 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 4,113
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
1936

So, today it's time to cover one of the sexiest warships ever built. Sure, more countries built sexy ships, like the Italian Littorio's or the French Richelieu's...but they aren't GERMAN sexy: sexy in way way which makes you want to scream SPARTAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!

Ahem, aaaanyway, today's main course: the German battleship/battlecruiser Scharnhorst!

With France launching the Dunkerque class of fast battleships, the German Kriegsmarine realised that their current class of heavy hitters (the Deutschland class "pocket battleships" or Panzerschiffe) were pretty much outclassed in every way. So, bigger and stronger ships were needed to counter this threat! So, under the rules of the Anglo-German Naval Agreement, two ships of 26,000 longs tons were laid down: Ersatz Elsass and Ersatz Hessen, later to be known as Scharnhorst and Gneisenau

Scharnhorst, lead ship of her class was laid down June 15th 1935 as "Panzerschiff D", later known as Ersatz Elsass. She was launched today, October 3rd 1936 and commissioned at January 7th 1939.


Posted Image
SPARTAAAAAaaa...eehm...Scharnhorst!



Battleship or Battlecruiser?
So, there is a bit of a discussion going on about the Scharnhorst class and how she should be classed. In general they were called and classified as slachtschiffe or battleships in English...but is that right? As i wrote earlier in my topic about the WW1 Ersatz Yorck class of battlecruisers is that the design of the Scharnhorst class is loosely based on the Yorck's design. And, to be honest, to upgrade a battlecruiser to a battleship some serious upgrading would be in order, right? Well, let's say she got an upgrade AND a downgrade at the same time. Compared to the Yorck's, his (Scharnhorst being a manly German ship) armor was on average 50mm thicker, making it in places (especially vertical armor) thicker than the Bismarck's, only the German Bayern class dreadnoughts had thicker armor on average! But her deck armor was only 50mm thick, less than half of what the Bismarck had (the obvious battlecruiser flaw, you could say).

Then the guns! Compared to the Yorck's 4x2 38cm (15") SK L/45 guns, Scharnhorst had 3x3 23cm (11") SK C/34 guns. So, a barrel extra but only half the broadside weight per salvo (8x750kg=6,000kg vs 9x330kg=2970). The saving grace of the C/34 guns was that they were able to fire roughly 3.5 rounds per minute, to the Yorck's 2.5 rpm, but still this meant that the Scharnhorst could fire 10,395kg's worth of shells per minute vs the Yorck's 15,000kg's per minute. To compare it with the Bismarck, he could fire between 14,720 and 19,200kg's per minute (rate of fire for the 38cm (15") SK C/34 is stated as 2.3 to 3 rounds per minute)


Posted Image
Actual 11" shell from Scharnhorst as displayed on HMS Belfast in London


Now one can ask "why the downgrade in guns??", well, that had to do with time constraints and politics. To complete the ships of the Scharnhorst class in time the decision was made to use guns which were already in production: the 11" guns used on the Deutschland class Panzerschiffe, also known as the famous "Pocket Battleships". So, instead of waiting for bigger guns, the German designers took the 23cm SK C/28, lengthened the the barrel a bit and the C/34 was born! However, politics also had to do with this. While Hitler soon had second thoughts about the size of the 11" guns (more on that later), he was also reminded that the British didn't really like having big-gunned ships in "their" backyard. And while 15" guns would still be under the 16" limit of the Anglo-German Naval Agreement, the Germans were sure that the British wouldn't agree to such heavy weapons. Also, it would take years for the design of the 15" turret (as used on the Bismarck class) to be finished, and that didn't fit in with Hitlers political agenda.

So, ultimately, the designers agreed on a 3x3 11" gun setup but the Germans wouldn't be German if they didn't have a backup plan: the Scharnhorst class was designed in such a way that upgunning them with 15" guns would be relatively easy...it just never happened.


Posted Image
Turrets Anton and Bruno of Scharnhorst


In conclusion of this part: better armor, worse guns. Speed? A reasonable 31.65 knots, only 1.65 knots faster than the Bissy. So can we call it a battleship or a battlecruiser? Personally i'm tempted to go with the battlecruiser, even though it's a pretty heavily armored one. As even with the 15" upgrade, they would only have three turrets, severely limiting the weight of the broadside compared to a proper battleship. But, if someone think he/she can convince me otherwise: feel free to do so!


Posted Image
Scharnhorst before receiving his Atlanic bow



Service life
Unlike the Bismarck and Tirpitz, Scharnhorst and his broter Gneisenau were pretty active during the war.

Scharnhorst took part in the following operations (soure: German-navy.de):

  • 18-20.02.1940: Operation "Nordmark": Scharnhorst, Gneisenau, CA Admiral Hipper and the destroyers Wolfgang Zenker, Wilhlem Heidkamp and Karl Galster are sent to intercept British convoys between Bergen and England, but no ships are sighted;
  • 07-12.04.1940: Operation "Weserübung": Scharnhorst and Gneisenau cover the invasion of Narvik. West of the Lofoten, they engage the British BC Renown and the cruiser Birmingham in bad weather;
  • 04.06.1940: Operation "Juno": Flagship in the Polar Sea operations together with Gneisenau, Admiral Hipper and the destroyers Karl Galster, Hans Lody, Erich Steinbrink and Hermann Schoemann;
  • 08.06.1940: Battle with British CV Glorious and the DDs Ardent and Acasta. All British ships are sunk, the Scharnhorst was hit by a torpedo of the DD Acasta, damaging middle and starboard engine and Turret Caesar (Scharnhorst scoring a hit at the Glorious at 24,200m (26,500yds), one of the longest ranged hits registerd by a ship);
  • 22.01.1941 to 22.03.1941: Operation "Berlin": Operation in the Atlantic in which Scharnhorst and Gneisenau sank 22 ships with 115600t during their North Atlantic Operations. Scharnhorst sinks 8 of them with 49300t;
  • 11-12.02.1942: Operation "Ceberus" aka "The Channel Dash": Flagship during the escape the English Channel: Scharnhorst , Gneisenau and CA Prinz Eugen, escorted by 6 destroyers (Paul Jakobi, Richard Beitzen, Friedrich Ihn, Hermann Schoemann, Z25, Z29) and 14 torpedo boats (e.g. Kondor, Jaguar, T12, T13), return to Germany;
  • 06-07.09.1943: Operation "Sizilien": A squadron consisting of Tirpitz, Scharnhorst and 9 destroyers (Erich Steinbrink, Karl Galster, Hans Lody, Theodor Riedel, Z27, Z29, Z30, Z31, Z33) attack the enemy base on Spitzbergen.

And finally...

The Battle of North Cape

With the war in Russia getting worse with each day, the Kriegsmarine realized that it was of the utmost importance to halt the flow of supplies going from the Allies to Russia. However, with the Luftwaffe being busy covering the (by then) German retreat and the Allies getting better and better at detecting and destroying u-boats, the only thing the Kriegsmarine had available was Scharnhorst. So, Großadmiral Karl Dönitz ordered the commanding officer of Scharnhorst, Konteradmiral Erich Bey, to attack the Allied convoys taking the northern route to Russia.

At December 22nd Bey was ordered to be on standby and be ready to sail within 3 hours notice, as a convoy had been spotted 400 nautical miles off the coast of Norway. It took until December 25th 09:00 until the order was given to Scharnhorst to set sail and intercept the convoy. She left the port around 19:00 with an escort of 5 destroyers, planning to attack the convoy around 10:00 the next day.

Timing would be cruicial though, because there was only 45 minutes of full daylight at that time of the year and 6 hours of twilight. Unlike Jutland, where the British had only a numerical advantage, the Allies also had a technological advantage with radar-directed fire control. While the Scharnhorst also had radar, it wasn't as advanced as the sets the Allies used, and Bey knew this.

Bey had planned his attack so that he would engage the convoy and it's escorts at 10:00, giving him a clear advantage over the three British cruisers: HMS Norfolk, HMS Belfast and HMS Sheffield. To mask his approach, Bey ordered the radar of Scharnhorst to be turned off so the British wouldn't pick up it's signals, but what Bey didn't know was that the British were intercepting the German radio transmissions and had the convoy shadowed by Admiral Bruce Fraser with his King George V class battleship Duke of York and his escorting cruiser and five destroyers.


Posted Image
HMS Duke of York


When battle was joined with the convoy escorts, luck wasn't on the side of Scharnhorst, she was rapidly hit by multiple 8" shells, destroying the forward rangefinder and the radar antenna. During the battle, Scharnhorst and the British cruisers played a deadly game of cat and mouse, with Scharnhorst inflicting some damage to the cruisers while receiving no noteworthy damage herself. Bey had ordered his destroyer escort to search for and engage the convoy, but they were unable to locate it, after which Bey ordered them to return to port.

At 16:17, with daylight long gone and Scharnhorst unable to escape due to the cruisers kep blocking her path, the British trap was finally sprung with the arrival of HMS Duke of York. At 16:50 Duke of York opened fire with her 14" guns, scoring a hit on Scharnhorst within 5 minutes, jamming turret Anton and starting a fire in the ammunition magazine, forcing Bey to flood the magazines of both Anton and Bruno turrets to prevent an explosion. Scharnhorst was hit at least another 12 times when Duke of York stopped firing at 18:42, but Scharnhorst was still pulling away, almost escaping. However, Scharnhorst's superstructure and weaponry wer heavily damaged, so Admiral Fraser ordered his destroyers HMS Scorpion and HNoMS Stord to make a torpedo attack. Of the eight torpedoes launched, four found their mark jamming turret Bruno, causing flooding and damaging the port propeller shaft.

With Scharnhorst now reduced to a speed of 12 knots, Duke of York managed to close the gap. Fraser then ordered another torpedo attack, which was succesful, scoring multiple hits.

At 19:45 Scharnhorst went down. The British ships initially picked up survivors, but were soon ordered away after picking up just 36 men. 1932 men perished.




Stats
Dimensions
Length (Total): 229,8 m (234,9 m since 1939 due to fitting of Atlantic bow)
Length (Waterline): 226,0 m
Beam: 30,0 m
Draft: 9,9 m

Weapons
28 cm L/51 C/34: 9
15 cm L/55 C28: 12
10,5 cm L/65 C/33: 14
3,7 cm L/83: 16
2 cm MG L/64: 10
53,3 cm Torpedoes: 6

Aircraft
Arado Ar 196: 3

Armor
Deck: 80-95 mm
Belt: 350 mm (max)
Command Tower: 350 mm (max)
Turrets: 360 mm (max)

Engines
Shafts: 3
Turbines: 3
Type: BBC

Performance
Total Performance: 161764shp
Speed: 31,65kn
Range: 9020 miles at 15 kn


Posted Image
Outline of Scharnhorst


Sources
German-navy.de
Navweaps.com
Wikipedia



"In Russia Vodka makes everything out of anything." - KGB - proof of awesome devs
"Oh no, you've got it wrong. It's not "everyone", it's about JeeWeeJ, the impersonation of evil on this forums..." - Ariecho


Priest79 #3 Posted 03 October 2013 - 05:37 PM

    Seaman

  • Members
  • 22
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Even if the Japaneses ship are my favorites, I must say that the Scharnhorst is a beauty

Edited by Priest79, 03 October 2013 - 07:25 PM.


Capcon #4 Posted 03 October 2013 - 05:38 PM

    Lieutenant Junior Grade

  • Alpha Tester
  • 1,475
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
A tidbit about the USS Lexington. During a drought in 1929 in the Tacoma, Washington area that left the city without electricity due to a lack of water to power hydro-electric dams in the area, the USS Lexington was pulled into service to provide that electric power for 30 day. A more detailed article can be found here:

http://www.thenewstr...red-tacoma.html
"Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." - Theodore Roosevelt

madmanthan21 #5 Posted 03 October 2013 - 05:46 PM

    Commander

  • Alpha Tester
  • 3,034
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
GOOD STUFF JEE!!!
i like this!
+1 to you too capcon

Edited by madmanthan21, 03 October 2013 - 05:46 PM.


MAXIMUS V GENE - i5-3570k @ 4.7Ghz - 2*MSI GTX 660Ti Power Edition @ 1.3Ghz - Corsair Vengence 2*8GB - 1TB WD Caviar green - 64GB V100 - Corsair GS700 - Corsair Graphite 600T - Razer BlackWidow - Corsair M65 - Logitech G35 - Thrustmaster T16000M - Dell ST2420L
"The object of war is not to die for your country, but to make the other bastard die for his."-- General George S. Patton http://wiredstar.com/WoWsWiki/


Capcon #6 Posted 03 October 2013 - 06:29 PM

    Lieutenant Junior Grade

  • Alpha Tester
  • 1,475
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Regarding the Battle of North Cape and how it might figure in game terms.

If the ratio of 1 BB = 2 CA/CL = 4 DD still holds true then this battle was about 5 versus 1 with the Scharnhorst being the lonely one.

In WoT's terms winning against those odds is called an epic achievement resulting in the Awarding of Kolbanov's Medal.
"Do what you can, with what you have, where you are." - Theodore Roosevelt

Ariecho #7 Posted 03 October 2013 - 06:39 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 5,381
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Yep, I also read about what Capcon mentioned, but decided not to mention it.  It was getting late, and I hadn't even started to write about Coral Sea.  +1 for mentioning it.


Discussing with a British officer: "You French fight for money, while we British fight for honour." "Sir, a man fights for what he lacks the most."
Robert Surcouf (French Corsair)


Ariecho #8 Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:21 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 5,381
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012

View PostPriest79, on 03 October 2013 - 05:37 PM, said:

Even if the Japs ship are my favorites, I must say that the Scharnhorst is a beauty

We call them "Japanese" on this forum...


Discussing with a British officer: "You French fight for money, while we British fight for honour." "Sir, a man fights for what he lacks the most."
Robert Surcouf (French Corsair)


aragorn #9 Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:22 PM

    Lieutenant Commander

  • Alpha Tester
  • 2,516
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
nice info and one really beautiful ship! :P

Priest79 #10 Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:26 PM

    Seaman

  • Members
  • 22
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012

View PostAriecho, on 03 October 2013 - 07:21 PM, said:

We call them "Japanese" on this forum...
I edited my prior post as to not insult anyone and conform myself to the standards

Ariecho #11 Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:31 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 5,381
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Thanks, appreciated!  +1


Discussing with a British officer: "You French fight for money, while we British fight for honour." "Sir, a man fights for what he lacks the most."
Robert Surcouf (French Corsair)


Coldt #12 Posted 03 October 2013 - 07:59 PM

    Ensign

  • Alpha Tester
  • 866
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
The most disappointing thing about the sinking of the Lexington, at least to me, isn't the actual sinking of the Lexington, it's what was done with her sister ship Saratoga. The U.S. has a tendency to put its most celebrated and decorated of creations to a less than dignifying end.  The Saratoga and Enterprise CV-6 should still be floating today.
It's really a shame that we don't have a Lexington class ship to enjoy and marvel at today for the sheer power of its history.

NGTM_1R #13 Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:02 AM

    Lieutenant Commander

  • Alpha Tester
  • 2,508
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
No mention of Scharnhorst losing the radar and being fighting essentially blind most of North Cape?
But we do not tell our children stories of monsters so that they will know monsters exist. You knew monsters existed before you could speak, before you could walk. You were told stories of monsters because those stories had heroes. You were told stories of monsters so that you would know monsters can be defeated.

tankwarhammer9000 #14 Posted 04 October 2013 - 12:34 AM

    Admiral of the Navy

  • Alpha Tester
  • 22,061
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Loved the ships :) Lady lex was a wonderful ship
but German naval builders created a powerful and beautiful ship +1

tankwarhammer9000sigv4_zpsc1aa0619.gif?t

Admiral of the Navy And Grand Empress


JeeWeeJ #15 Posted 04 October 2013 - 05:44 AM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 4,113
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012

View PostNGTM_1R, on 04 October 2013 - 12:02 AM, said:

No mention of Scharnhorst losing the radar and being fighting essentially blind most of North Cape?
It's in there, she lost her (forward) radar antenna and forward rangefinder just afer engaging the convoy escorts.

So, yeah, the limited radar-assisted fire control he might have had went up in smoke quite earpy in the fight.


"In Russia Vodka makes everything out of anything." - KGB - proof of awesome devs
"Oh no, you've got it wrong. It's not "everyone", it's about JeeWeeJ, the impersonation of evil on this forums..." - Ariecho


ScarredJosh #16 Posted 04 October 2013 - 07:12 AM

    Master Chief Petty Officer

  • Members
  • 200
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Scharnhorst is such a beautiful design. It will be one of my favorite ships to play. I cant wait.

RutgerS #17 Posted 04 October 2013 - 08:17 AM

    Lieutenant Commander

  • Alpha Tester
  • 2,479
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012
Another day, another interesting read!

When will you guys introduce the Narrated by Morgan Freeman function?  :glasses:


Ariecho #18 Posted 04 October 2013 - 01:16 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 5,381
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012

View PostRutgerS, on 04 October 2013 - 08:17 AM, said:

Another day, another interesting read!

When will you guys introduce the Narrated by Morgan Freeman function?  :glasses:

His lawyers are talking to our lawyers...


Discussing with a British officer: "You French fight for money, while we British fight for honour." "Sir, a man fights for what he lacks the most."
Robert Surcouf (French Corsair)


Ariecho #19 Posted 04 October 2013 - 01:24 PM

    Captain

  • Alpha Tester
  • 5,381
  • Member since:
    08-09-2012

View PostColdt, on 03 October 2013 - 07:59 PM, said:

The most disappointing thing about the sinking of the Lexington, at least to me, isn't the actual sinking of the Lexington, it's what was done with her sister ship Saratoga. The U.S. has a tendency to put its most celebrated and decorated of creations to a less than dignifying end.  The Saratoga and Enterprise CV-6 should still be floating today.
It's really a shame that we don't have a Lexington class ship to enjoy and marvel at today for the sheer power of its history.

I would agree with you.


Discussing with a British officer: "You French fight for money, while we British fight for honour." "Sir, a man fights for what he lacks the most."
Robert Surcouf (French Corsair)


Wolcott #20 Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:51 PM

    Master Chief Petty Officer

  • Members
  • 372
  • Member since:
    12-30-2012

Today marks the 70th anniversary of the Battle of North Cape. Remembering the men from both sides who died that day.


HMS Prince of Wales - "Ich Dien"