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Caliber vs Trajectory vs Travel Time vs Range


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PotatoMoe #1 Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:29 PM

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Hello, 

 

I've seen very few threads discuss these factors. Its usually more about range and dispersion. Ships with quick reload times, smaller calibers and shorter range have very high arcs. 

 

While a low arc and low travel time make things easier to hit. One would assume that a high muzzle velocity would equal to a low travel time in say meters/second.

 

So does having the highest caliber (in BBs for example) equal to slower reloads and therefore flatter trajectories?  



mr3awsome #2 Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:38 PM

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As usual, it depends on the nation of origin. 

During the WWII period, Italian & Russian guns had very high velocities. 

Whilst this gives them excellent trajectories, it often gave them poor dispersion and more frequent barrel replacement as well. 

The latter isn't represented in game, and the former is implemented rather arbitrarily Cough Molotov Cough so isn't really something to be relied upon. 

 

At the other end of the scale there are some weapons with low velocities. The US Super Heavy Shells are a good example of these, and can be seen on the North CarolinaIowa & Montana. 

The arcs are not as good, but the barrel wear was low, and dispersion tended to be better. 


 


Poland has more unique warships to contribute than Canada.


PotatoMoe #3 Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:58 PM

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Ok, thanks for the reply but historical facts have pretty much no effect in game and yes I have heard that Russian cruisers have low arcs but due to a disability I don't play cruisers  and only play BBs. 

 

In your opinion which BB line (US, JPN, Germany) has the lowest shell flight arcs? 

 

I know that a low arc is balanced by a lot of things but I gotta start with something. 



SireneRacker #4 Posted 07 May 2017 - 01:01 PM

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View PostPotatoMoe, on 07 May 2017 - 01:58 PM, said:

Ok, thanks for the reply but historical facts have pretty much no effect in game and yes I have heard that Russian cruisers have low arcs but due to a disability I don't play cruisers  and only play BBs. 

 

In your opinion which BB line (US, JPN, Germany) has the lowest shell flight arcs? 

 

I know that a low arc is balanced by a lot of things but I gotta start with something. 

 

They are all low but I personally find the Japanese Battleships to feel the best while firing.

Proud member of [WAIFU], nothing beats Prinz Eugen

 

Torpedoes don't have any friends. So they will kill everything in their path. To prevent team kills we should all watch out where we fire those fishes. That means each and everyone of us, DDs of the second line!

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DanielLeary #5 Posted 07 May 2017 - 02:30 PM

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iChase recently did a Captain's Academy on Dispersion where he discusses the three components (Horizontal Dispersion, Vertical Dispersion, and Sigma).  Horizontal Dispersion is the value shown in the tooltip for the guns and is the dispersion to the left/right of the aiming point.  Vertical Dispersion is a hidden stat and is overshoots/undershoots. Sigma is how likely the shells are to land in the center of the dispersion ellipse.

 

In the video, he compares the horizontal and vertical dispersion of 2 ships at 10 km.  These ships are the Amagi (806 m/s AP shell velocity) and the North Carolina (701 m/s AP shell velocity).  In the table below, I have placed the values he showed in the video.  If you notice, both ships have identical horizontal dispersion, however, the ship with the slower shell velocity and higher arcs has better vertical dispersion.

Ship                     Horizontal       Vertical

Amagi                    139 m              634 m

North Carolina       137 m              451 m

 



DerKrampus #6 Posted 07 May 2017 - 03:38 PM

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It depends.  Travel time is determined by the muzzle velocity, the ballistic coefficient (BC) of the projectile, etc.  All of these properties can be drastically different from ship to ship.

 

Muzzle velocity is the speed of the projectile as it leaves the barrel.  It's primarily determined by the weight of the projectile, the power of its propellant charge, and the length of the barrels from which they're fired.  

    -Lighter projectiles, stronger propellant charges, and longer barrels will tend to produce higher muzzle velocities.  Compare something like the Germans, with their fast, light Ap shells, to something like the Americans, with their slower, lazier but heavier shells.

 

BC is the ability of the projectile to push through the air, and resist aerodynamic drag.  A High BC is generally derived from "slick" aerodynamics, and a projectile that's long and heavy for its caliber.  All other things being equal, a round with a higher BC is going to shoot "flatter."  A round with low BC might leave the barrel fast, but will quickly begin to slow down due to drag.

 

Reload speed doesn't enter into it.

 


 





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